Spider plant or potho?

Which uses up nitrates faster when roots are in an aquarium?

  • Spider plant

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Potho

    Votes: 3 100.0%

  • Total voters
    3

Ssnaaiil

Are spider plants or pothos better are using up nitrates?
 

RayClem

I suspect it would be necessary to run a controlled scientific experiment to test this. I doubt this has been done, so I doubt anyone really knows. The bigger the plant gets, the more nutrients it will consume. Either plant should be helpful in reducing nitrates.

Sweet potato plants can also be grown to reduce nitrates.
 

Flyfisha

I am no scientist so have not done a controlled Scientific test. I don’t feel I need to be that controlled about having an opinion at least? Having both growing in my fish room it is my strong belief that the faster growing and more succulent leaves of the pothos plants use a little more nutrients to grow than spider plants.

I can say even without a Scientific test that a couple of dozen pothos plants in each 20 gallon/ 80 litre tank does not change the need for weekly water changes. The amount of nitrates used per plant is negligible / minimal.

image.jpg
 

mimo91088

I had a tank with Chinese evergreen, pothos, dracaena, and peace lily roots in it. Chinese evergreen outcompeted everything, with peace lily coming in second. I'd recommend either of those 2 plants first. But if you're just choosing between the 2 then my money is on the pothos.
 

RayClem

Just because the Chinese evergreen outcompeted the other plants in your tank does not mean that it consumed nitrates more rapidly than the others. Plants require a variety of nutrients; different plants have different requirements for each nutrient. All you can really state conclusively is that the Chinese evergreen grew well in your tank because the growing conditions favored it over the others. However, along with Spider plants and Pothos, it would be a good option.
 

Flyfisha

Something I forgot to add earlier.
Most pothos in containers is actually multiple cuttings in the one pot.Six or more vines growing in the one pot that looks like one plant. It’s possible to have multiple stems of pothos in a small area of a fish tank. The way a spider plant grows it will limit how many plants can fit in the same area.

Please disregard most U tube videos made by fish keepers in regards to propagating pothos. Yes just breaking off a 3 foot stem is one way to get more plants. If you really want multiple healthy cuttings watch this video at the 2 minute mark.

 

Pfrozen

Spider plants won't grow with the roots sitting in water... They'll do great for a month and then one day you'll wake up and find a brick of mold and rotting plant matter where the roots should be... I've tried growing them in filters too and its always the same story
 

Flyfisha

Perhaps it’s just your water Pfrozen?
My soft low GH water has kept 3 going for more than 12 months.
They are top heavy and need gravel around the roots to stop them falling out of a tank but it’s not essential to keep them alive.
 

Pfrozen

Perhaps it’s just your water Pfrozen?
My soft low GH water has kept 3 going for more than 12 months.
They are top heavy and need gravel around the roots to stop them falling out of a tank but it’s not essential to keep them alive.

Hm maybe, that was before I switched to RO. My water was moderately soft before though, KH 4 GH 8. Good on you for getting those things to grow lol. Maybe I just have a brown thumb
 

Ssnaaiil

Spider plants won't grow with the roots sitting in water... They'll do great for a month and then one day you'll wake up and find a brick of mold and rotting plant matter where the roots should be... I've tried growing them in filters too and its always the same story
I have spider plants in a few of my tanks right now and it’s been over a year and they are doing great! I am thinking about doing some potho cuttings.
 

mimo91088

Just because the Chinese evergreen outcompeted the other plants in your tank does not mean that it consumed nitrates more rapidly than the others. Plants require a variety of nutrients; different plants have different requirements for each nutrient. All you can really state conclusively is that the Chinese evergreen grew well in your tank because the growing conditions favored it over the others. However, along with Spider plants and Pothos, it would be a good option.
Fair point. All I know is it allowed me to sometimes go 3-4 weeks without changing water in a 40 gallon tank with 3 adult goldfish without breaking 60 ppm nitrates. Whether it was the evergreen or another plant, all I know is that combo works very well and the evergreen had the most growth by far.
 

JavaMossMan

Something I forgot to add earlier.
Most pothos in containers is actually multiple cuttings in the one pot.Six or more vines growing in the one pot that looks like one plant. It’s possible to have multiple stems of pothos in a small area of a fish tank. The way a spider plant grows it will limit how many plants can fit in the same area.

Please disregard most U tube videos made by fish keepers in regards to propagating pothos. Yes just breaking off a 3 foot stem is one way to get more plants. If you really want multiple healthy cuttings watch this video at the 2 minute mark.
Hey Flyfisha, I saw that video too and tried it a few months ago and it worked great. Now I got a nice full bushy pot of pothos. Prior to using the propagation method that I learned in that video I used to take the vines with multiple leaves on them and wait for the vine to root.
 

RayClem

Fair point. All I know is it allowed me to sometimes go 3-4 weeks without changing water in a 40 gallon tank with 3 adult goldfish without breaking 60 ppm nitrates. Whether it was the evergreen or another plant, all I know is that combo works very well and the evergreen had the most growth by far.
Please remember that nitrates are not the only contaminants in an aquarium, especially one that is overcrowded as your goldfish tank might well be, depending upon the size of the fish. While your plants might consume some the nitrates that you can measure, that does not mean they are removing the contaminants that you cannot measure. That is why water changes are needed.
 

nanoist

Houseplant enthusiast here! Either of those plants will robustly root in water and sustain themselves. I’ve grown spider plants and pothos in glass jars and vases successfully multiple times. HOWEVER, for the purpose of nitrogen filtration in a fish tank, the pothos will look and perform better. Pothos is a plant that’s a member of the Airoid family. And they grow in water so crazy and constantly off shoot roots from their multiple nodes on their stems. So realistically if you’re looking for nitrates being sucked up in excess and provide that stunning jungle look, pothos. But any airoid will do! Listed below are some options I would also recommend:
  • Syngoniums (Arrowhead plants)
  • Monstera (larger option)
  • Raphidaphora tetrasperma (monstera but mini :))
  • Spathyphylums (peace lilies)
  • Anthuriums (flamingo lily)
  • Aglaonemas (Chinese evergreens, I recommend ‘Maria’ or ‘Cutless’ or ‘Tigress’)
  • Philodendron cordatum (softer, thinner heart shaped leaved alternative to pothos. Just as robust though don’t take it’s delicate appearance too seriously).


  • all of these make great paladurium emerged root filters
 

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