Something's Finally Happening!

Tikkakoski

Hello again!

I am excited to report my nitrates are finally going up and today was the first time I've seen nitrites greater than the blip of 0.25 ppm I had at the very beginning of my cycling (before I added TSS+). Currently my parameters are as follows:

Ammonia 2ppm
Nitrites 0.50 ppm
Nitrates 20-40 ppm (the difference is a bit hard for me to tell)

If I've done my reading correctly I should be doing a water change in the near future and re-dosing ammonia because if my aquarium can process ammonia in less than 24 hours I should be ready for a fish right? My only question is I've kept ammonia at 2ppm since 6/16-6/17 after I dosed the tank to 4ppm and it dropped in half. I have NEVER seen my tank below 0.5 ppm and that was rare. It's a fishless cycle so there is nothing dying in my tank that I'm aware of and the anacharis melting pile of goo I once had is gone- s o I'm at a bit of a crossroads as to what to do. Should I

a) Do a 50% water change and re-dose the ammonia to 4ppm?
b) Do a larger water change?
c) Wait until (....) happens?
d) None of the above (here is where you tell me what I need to do)

Thanks in advance!

Tikka


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Zerokyo2

I'm sure there are way more experienced members that can off insight, but for now, you wait. Since it's a fishless cycle, no need to change water at the moment. Once ammonia drops down to .25 to 0ppm, you can dose with more ammonia, and try not to let nitrites get past 4-5ppm.


I am in the process of my fishless cycle myself and ended up having to do a 50% water change due to my Nitrites and Nitrates being off the charts (API Test Kit) and I had to lower it to "not stall" my cycle.

I use Seachem Stability for my bacteria, and it seems to be working, but its pretty much similar to TSS.

Good luck with your cycle!
 

SeanyBaggs123

Never done a fishless cycle, but my instinct would be to wait until ammonia reaches 0 - .25 ppm
mattgirl can probably help more.
 

mattgirl

Zerokyo2 is correct. Don't do anything at this point. Let the ammonia go down to close to zero before you add more. If you got a good bottle of TSS it is possible your nitrites may not go any higher than they are right now.

For now it is just a waiting game. You are waiting for the ammonia and nitrites to go down to zero. Your nitrates aren't too high at this point .

But if you have not done a water change since you started this cycle it might help to do a one now. All of the minerals present in our tap water have probably been used up so a water change should replenish them. I would change out at least 50% of the water. Once you have done the water change go ahead and add enough ammonia to get it up to 2ppm.

Edited to add: I just noticed the PH. It is hard to tell but am I seeing a really low PH? A PH lower than 6.5 or so has been known to slow the cycling process down to a crawl. If the PH of your source water is higher a water change should raise it up where it needs to be.
 

Tikkakoski

Zerokyo2 is correct. Don't do anything at this point. Let the ammonia go down to close to zero before you add more. If you got a good bottle of TSS it is possible your nitrites may not go any higher than they are right now.

For now it is just a waiting game. You are waiting for the ammonia and nitrites to go down to zero. Your nitrates aren't too high at this point .

But if you have not done a water change since you started this cycle it might help to do a one now. All of the minerals present in our tap water have probably been used up so a water change should replenish them. I would change out at least 50% of the water. Once you have done the water change go ahead and add enough ammonia to get it up to 2ppm.

Edited to add: I just noticed the PH. It is hard to tell but am I seeing a really low PH? A PH lower than 6.5 or so has been known to slow the cycling process down to a crawl. If the PH of your source water is higher a water change should raise it up where it needs to be.

My pH (according to my little card) has been between 6.8- 7.0 and solid as a rock there. I figured given how stable it was I shouldn't do anything chemically to change it even though Ive read the pH being low can slow a cycle. As far as the water change is concerned I have not done one since I added the first ammonia to get it back to 4ppm on the 16th so I'll to wait and see what happens tomorrow and if today wasn't a fluke with my results a 50% water change it is!

Thanks all

Tikka
 

mattgirl

My pH (according to my little card) has been between 6.8- 7.0 and solid as a rock there. I figured given how stable it was I shouldn't do anything chemically to change it even though Ive read the pH being low can slow a cycle. As far as the water change is concerned I have not done one since I added the first ammonia to get it back to 4ppm on the 16th so I'll to wait and see what happens tomorrow and if today wasn't a fluke with my results a 50% water change it is!

Thanks all

Tikka
That PH level is fine. It was just hard to tell in the photo. I am glad you are hesitant to chemically alter the PH. Stable is much better than a specific number.

I have to use crushed coral in my tanks to keep the PH stable. I have very soft water but the very very slowly dissolving chunks of coral keeps mine at a solid 7.2 I will always go the natural way if at all possible in all cases.
 

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