Someone talk me out of a reef tank

TheWalkman

After I moved 2 years ago I’ve avoided doing a reef tank again due to the time commitment. But I keep seeing beautiful reef tanks and especially small tanks on Instagram right now.
I have a fluval spec V and an AI prime sitting in storage that would be perfect for a torch or softy tank.
I have 3 freshwater tanks running great right now. Someon please give me reasons why I shouldn’t try a reef tank.
 

jkkgron2

IME it’s much harder to maintain a sw tank because all of the animals and corals are more sensitive than freshwater fish (even the hardier sw fish still can be hard) so keep that in mind if you end up doing it. If you do end up doing it you should also get live rock to speed up the cycle.
 
Upvote 0

SotaAquatics

Sharks. This is exactly how you get sharks in the house, and nobody wants that.

Well. some of us want sharks. I would like a shark some day... so I think you should do it.
 
Upvote 0

BigManAquatics

Don't set up a reeftank or i will drive all 250+ pounds of me right into your toe!!
 
Upvote 0

MyFishAddiction

Just don't ask ChrissFishes01. He'll be no help lol.
Think about the money. One of the cheapest SW fish I've ever seen was $14.
 
Upvote 0

Ouse

Saltwater is harder to research than freshwater because the latter is much more popular. Saltwater can be a grey area so to speak.
 
Upvote 0

SotaAquatics

Do it. You didn't come on here to actually be talked out of it! You have everything ready to go! We would love to see pictures of set up process and updates.
 
Upvote 0

PNWAquatics

Reef tanks are so much fun. I think you should do it. You’ve got the tank and the light already!
 
Upvote 0

Jesterrace

After I moved 2 years ago I’ve avoided doing a reef tank again due to the time commitment. But I keep seeing beautiful reef tanks and especially small tanks on Instagram right now.
I have a fluval spec V and an AI prime sitting in storage that would be perfect for a torch or softy tank.
I have 3 freshwater tanks running great right now. Someon please give me reasons why I shouldn’t try a reef tank.

Given that you technically have a good portion of the equipment already, I can't give you a real one. I guess the question is how often do you travel?
IME it’s much harder to maintain a sw tank because all of the animals and corals are more sensitive than freshwater fish (even the hardier sw fish still can be hard) so keep that in mind if you end up doing it. If you do end up doing it you should also get live rock to speed up the cycle.

As someone with both in the house, I have to disagree. I have had far more problems with the likes of basic plants than I have had with LPS Corals and have had far more fish deaths from Freshwater (ie Tetras, Guppies, Endlers, Dwarf Gouramis) then I have had with any saltwater fish and I have been doing Saltwater longer than Fresh.
 
Upvote 0

TheWalkman

SotaAquatics sharks in the house is the goal one day!
And to everyone I agree money is the biggest issue that’s why I don’t want to set me 40gallon up again because it needs better lights and more expensive pumps.
The next biggest issue is I love the simplicity of my freshwater tanks. I like that if I miss a week of water changes my tanks are totally fine. That’s why I understock.
But I may have caught the itch I’ve spent the last couple days watching pico reef videos.
But I don’t need 4 tanks to take care of
 
Upvote 0

fish 321

I mean I maintain my saltwater tank less than when I had freshwater. My 10 gallon nano reef is going on 4 months without a water change.
 
Upvote 0

TheWalkman

I mean I maintain my saltwater tank less than when I had freshwater. My 10 gallon nano reef is going on 4 months without a water change.
How did you manage to go 4 months with out a water change?
Everything I keep reading talks about weekly water changes are a must.
 
Upvote 0

Nickguy5467

How did you manage to go 4 months with out a water change?
Everything I keep reading talks about weekly water changes are a must.
i remember my friend saying he doesnt do waterchanges either as he has some plant called chaedo or something in the sump that does all the work for him
 
Upvote 0

Jesterrace

i remember my friend saying he doesnt do waterchanges either as he has some plant called chaedo or something in the sump that does all the work for him

Chaeto. It's a Macro Algae that helps with Biofiltration. It's good stuff.
 
Upvote 0

fish 321

How did you manage to go 4 months with out a water change?
Everything I keep reading talks about weekly water changes are a must.
I literally do nothing
 
Upvote 0

Asomeone

So just my 2cents being someone who was in a similar situation a few years back.
I don't know your financial situation but I think money is the biggest factor. I tried to do it cheaply when I first got into this hobby and it just was so hard. Yes its of course possible, but starting out with good equipment that will last is soooo much easier than trying to make basic lights and barebones systems operate. I tried so hard to make a fluval flex 15gal work with basic equipment and it just failed spectacularly. I have since upgraded with proper lights, pumps, and larger tank and have seen explosive growth in corals. This could easily just be me and could have been mitigated with proper more effective research. However, it's not always that easy. What works for one experienced reefer who is setting up a low budget tank may not work for the inexperienced reefer. I feel like its a lot more nuanced than freshwater.
If you set yourself up right from the start it'll be a lot easier is what I'm trying to get at. So if you can drop a bunch of cash off the bat go for it.
The other thing is water storage. For me this is problem because I live in a 1 bedroom apartment. I store my mixed salt water and rodi water in 2 trash cans in my kitchen but it does take up significant space. Having to have enough mixed saltwater on hand to do significant water changes in case of emergency is paramount imo.
Automation is another thing. It helps so much. Trying to set up a basic light to run on a timer works but having one of these more advanced lights that I can program lighting schedules and spectrums from is so helpful. Same goes for pumps. Customizing my flow patterns throughout the day allows me to blow all my gunk up at certain times while giving my fish time to swim a bit easier throughout the night.
Auto top offs 100% required.
Lastly,
get a good and properly sized RODI system. I personally love my BRS system it gives me more than enough rodi water with all the bells and whistles to make me happy. I tried for about a year to use a basic robuddy and just...nah....after i upgraded I will always suggest the bigger investment.

I guess its just if you're willing to take the time to plan all these things out to make it easy to be successful. If you just jump into it...like i did...its not particularly fun and made me dislike saltwater just due to my own shortcomings.
 
Upvote 0

LadfromLondon

Saltwater fish are typically wild caught. Do you really want to take some fish/corals away from their buddies? ;)
 
Upvote 0

Zach72202

I will try my best to talk you out of it, but I am not sure I can.

1) Setting it up would be so hard. You already have everything practically to start it. All you'd really need is water and rock! Not like you can get any of that pretty affordable.

2) A fire shrimp and a green banded goby would look so terrible together in a tank. Also so terribly hard to find at a shop!

3) For corals, a few zoas, some euphyllia, and a back wall of green star polyps would be so hard to come acrossed. Super tedious to maintain too! Really finicky corals.

4) Its such a huge tank, finding a place to put it would be awful.

5) Doing 50% waterchanges even in a 5g bucket would be diffucult. You'd have to carry half a bucket of water. Half I say!

Well, I tried. I hope I helped.
 
Upvote 0

Dobert

I will try my best to talk you out of it, but I am not sure I can.

1) Setting it up would be so hard. You already have everything practically to start it. All you'd really need is water and rock! Not like you can get any of that pretty affordable.

2) A fire shrimp and a green banded goby would look so terrible together in a tank. Also so terribly hard to find at a shop!

3) For corals, a few zoas, some euphyllia, and a back wall of green star polyps would be so hard to come acrossed. Super tedious to maintain too! Really finicky corals.

4) Its such a huge tank, finding a place to put it would be awful.

5) Doing 50% waterchanges even in a 5g bucket would be diffucult. You'd have to carry half a bucket of water. Half I say!

Well, I tried. I hope I helped.

6) people visiting your home are likely to secretly hate you
 
Upvote 0

TheWalkman

So my adhd impulsiveness got the best of me. Maybe this isn’t the best hobby for me.
 

Attachments

  • 707CCE74-2B82-4532-B7D0-E5ACE70A1BE8.jpeg
    707CCE74-2B82-4532-B7D0-E5ACE70A1BE8.jpeg
    247.3 KB · Views: 14
  • BFBDEED1-1DD6-4E13-A1FC-57447E80CB4E.jpeg
    BFBDEED1-1DD6-4E13-A1FC-57447E80CB4E.jpeg
    233.3 KB · Views: 15
Upvote 0

Dobert

you would do it anyway
 
Upvote 0

Similar Aquarium Threads

  • Question
Replies
11
Views
480
Jesterrace
  • Question
Replies
5
Views
540
AggressiveAquatics
  • Locked
Replies
10
Views
331
ZansAquatica
Replies
4
Views
164
alexk77
  • Question
Replies
9
Views
238
Vishaquatics

Latest Aquarium Threads

Top Bottom