Some Cycling Questions

Dandelion-Dream

Active Member
Member
Messages
214
Question - Will My Fish Be Stunted?

As mentioned in the linked thread above, I will move my fish to a 55 gallon tank and out of their 10 gallon in a few months. Since they're used to their 10 gal, how should I do my cycling? Fishless/Using fish food would be preferable. I would probably get super attached to a cycling fish and end up having another overstocked tank.

Here's what I'm looking for:
-How long would it take to cycle this tank using fish flakes?
-What amount should I put in, considering their current home's size and water conditions and the size of the future one?
-What is the best way of moving your fish in a new tank? Drip-Acclimate or an alternative method?
-Any recommendations or tips from experience?

Just preparing for when the time comes around!
 

adh/smile

Well Known
Member
Messages
1,033
Hi! Great job researching to prepare for what you are going to do in a couple months! A lot of people don't do proper research and just begin acting (myself included when I started).

I cycled my tank using the fish flake method. Every day I would put a pinch of flakes into the tank and let them turn into ammonia and the cycle would continue. I treated my tank as if there were fish in it; decorations, substrate, a running filter and heater were all accountable. It took me a little over a month to cycle my tank that way.
If you already have a cycled tank(s), you could also take some filter media out of the cycled tank and put it into the new, unicycled tank and it will make the new tank instantly cycled. Or you could buy some ammonia at the store and follow the instructions that come with it to cycle your tank.

The best way to move your fish to the new tank in my opinion is very easy. If you're just relocating fish you already own from one tank to the other you should be able to just net them and put them right into the new tank. THAT IS ONLY IF: water parameters from both tanks are the same (same ammonia, nitrite, nitrate levels; pH, etc.), the same water temperature, the same water source (tap water, bottled water, etc.). The fish you own will have become accustomed to their water and if both tanks are the same, you may just net them and transfer them into the new tank.
If you are buying new fish to add to your new tank. Slowly acclimate them using the drip method, soaking method, or any other suggested method.

Personally, I think the best thing we can do as fish owners when we get new fish is when acclimating them is to make sure the water temperatures are the same. I think there is a lot of suggested means to make the fish adjust to the new water by drip-acclimating, or float-acclimating....within 40 minutes??? That is not biologically accurate because it takes several days for a fish to fully acclimate to different water conditions. Not water temperature though. Really, no matter what method of acclimation you do, it's just to make the fish become accustomed to any water temperature difference.

I hope this helps!!!! Good luck with your new tank
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #3
OP
Dandelion-Dream

Dandelion-Dream

Active Member
Member
Messages
214
adh/smile said:
Hi! Great job researching to prepare for what you are going to do in a couple months! A lot of people don't do proper research and just begin acting (myself included when I started).

I cycled my tank using the fish flake method. Every day I would put a pinch of flakes into the tank and let them turn into ammonia and the cycle would continue. I treated my tank as if there were fish in it; decorations, substrate, a running filter and heater were all accountable. It took me a little over a month to cycle my tank that way.
If you already have a cycled tank(s), you could also take some filter media out of the cycled tank and put it into the new, unicycled tank and it will make the new tank instantly cycled. Or you could buy some ammonia at the store and follow the instructions that come with it to cycle your tank.

The best way to move your fish to the new tank in my opinion is very easy. If you're just relocating fish you already own from one tank to the other you should be able to just net them and put them right into the new tank. THAT IS ONLY IF: water parameters from both tanks are the same (same ammonia, nitrite, nitrate levels; pH, etc.), the same water temperature, the same water source (tap water, bottled water, etc.). The fish you own will have become accustomed to their water and if both tanks are the same, you may just net them and transfer them into the new tank.
If you are buying new fish to add to your new tank. Slowly acclimate them using the drip method, soaking method, or any other suggested method.

Personally, I think the best thing we can do as fish owners when we get new fish is when acclimating them is to make sure the water temperatures are the same. I think there is a lot of suggested means to make the fish adjust to the new water by drip-acclimating, or float-acclimating....within 40 minutes??? That is not biologically accurate because it takes several days for a fish to fully acclimate to different water conditions. Not water temperature though. Really, no matter what method of acclimation you do, it's just to make the fish become accustomed to any water temperature difference.

I hope this helps!!!! Good luck with your new tank
Great info! I did months of research before getting my fish, and I always try to be prepared. It was an itching array of questions I had, and I put them down for answering so I would know what to do beforehand. I also happen to have a forgetful nature, especially when it comes to random questions that pop in your head, so I bookmarked this page and wrote them all down.

My 10 gallon is pretty cycled by now, so all I'll need when I do get that new tank is more supplies and extra filter media.
 

mynamesjeff

New Member
Member
Messages
11
When I upgraded to my 240g tank I cycled with raw pieces of shrimp. I put some in a media bag and moved it around every so often. Took a few weeks and some water changes to cycle.
It does smell a tad bit though, but I didn't mind since it was an outside tank. You could run carbon to reduce the smell though!
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
OP
Dandelion-Dream

Dandelion-Dream

Active Member
Member
Messages
214
mynamesjeff said:
When I upgraded to my 240g tank I cycled with raw pieces of shrimp. I put some in a media bag and moved it around every so often. Took a few weeks and some water changes to cycle.
It does smell a tad bit though, but I didn't mind since it was an outside tank. You could run carbon to reduce the smell though!
A smelly tank would be a huge problem, since it would probably be in the same room where I sleep. Trust me, an unpleasant aroma is even more unpleasant if you have to inhale it all night. Do fish flakes produce a more minor smell?
 

mynamesjeff

New Member
Member
Messages
11
Dandelion-Dream said:
A smelly tank would be a huge problem, since it would probably be in the same room where I sleep. Trust me, an unpleasant aroma is even more unpleasant if you have to inhale it all night. Do fish flakes produce a more minor smell?
Yes, close to nothing I would think.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #7
OP
Dandelion-Dream

Dandelion-Dream

Active Member
Member
Messages
214
adh/smile said:
Hi! Great job researching to prepare for what you are going to do in a couple months! A lot of people don't do proper research and just begin acting (myself included when I started).

I cycled my tank using the fish flake method. Every day I would put a pinch of flakes into the tank and let them turn into ammonia and the cycle would continue. I treated my tank as if there were fish in it; decorations, substrate, a running filter and heater were all accountable. It took me a little over a month to cycle my tank that way.
If you already have a cycled tank(s), you could also take some filter media out of the cycled tank and put it into the new, unicycled tank and it will make the new tank instantly cycled. Or you could buy some ammonia at the store and follow the instructions that come with it to cycle your tank.

The best way to move your fish to the new tank in my opinion is very easy. If you're just relocating fish you already own from one tank to the other you should be able to just net them and put them right into the new tank. THAT IS ONLY IF: water parameters from both tanks are the same (same ammonia, nitrite, nitrate levels; pH, etc.), the same water temperature, the same water source (tap water, bottled water, etc.). The fish you own will have become accustomed to their water and if both tanks are the same, you may just net them and transfer them into the new tank.
If you are buying new fish to add to your new tank. Slowly acclimate them using the drip method, soaking method, or any other suggested method.

Personally, I think the best thing we can do as fish owners when we get new fish is when acclimating them is to make sure the water temperatures are the same. I think there is a lot of suggested means to make the fish adjust to the new water by drip-acclimating, or float-acclimating....within 40 minutes??? That is not biologically accurate because it takes several days for a fish to fully acclimate to different water conditions. Not water temperature though. Really, no matter what method of acclimation you do, it's just to make the fish become accustomed to any water temperature difference.

I hope this helps!!!! Good luck with your new tank
Also, when cycling, do you just put it straight in the tank or place it in the filter for the best results?

mynamesjeff said:
Yes, close to nothing I would think.
Sounds good.
 

JRS

Well Known
Member
Messages
1,349
Dandelion-Dream said:
Also, when cycling, do you just put it straight in the tank or place it in the filter for the best results?
Do you mean the filter media? You need to put the filter media in the filter to get the water flowing over/through it. You can just put your old filter on the new tank, obviously you would need a second filter to get adequate flow for the larger tank which would give you redundancy (which isn't a bad thing if a filter were to break) or simply put the old media into a new filter. I just upgrade from a twenty to a thirty. I took all the media out of my penguin filter (except the biowheel) and put it in an AC70, along with some new media to fill up the larger filter. The transition was flawless, no cycle issues at all. As long as you initially just move the same fish into the tank the BB will be enough to support them. Personally, I would wait at least a week before introducing new fish to make sure all it settled out.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #9
OP
Dandelion-Dream

Dandelion-Dream

Active Member
Member
Messages
214
JRS said:
Do you mean the filter media? You need to put the filter media in the filter to get the water flowing over/through it. You can just put your old filter on the new tank, obviously you would need a second filter to get adequate flow for the larger tank which would give you redundancy (which isn't a bad thing if a filter were to break) or simply put the old media into a new filter. I just upgrade from a twenty to a thirty. I took all the media out of my penguin filter (except the biowheel) and put it in an AC70, along with some new media to fill up the larger filter. The transition was flawless, no cycle issues at all. As long as you initially just move the same fish into the tank the BB will be enough to support them. Personally, I would wait at least a week before introducing new fish to make sure all it settled out.
Yes. I'm aware you have to put it in the filter media, as that was what I was referring to. Sorry if I wasn't that specific.
 

New Threads

Similar Threads

Similar Threads

Follow FishLore!

FishLore on Social Media

Online statistics

Members online
90
Guests online
2,018
Total visitors
2,108

Aquarium Photo Contests

Aquarium Calculator

Top Bottom