Solitary loaches?

SouthAmericanCichlids

Member
So I want to get a few loaches for my 55g. And I want ones that can live alone. And they can't cost more than 12 dollars. I want to add at least 3-4 loach species to liven up the bottom of the tank. And I do have a sand substrate.
 

veggieshark

Member
Is this going to be a tropical temperature tank?

When you say loach, I immediately think botia loaches, but I suppose you are OK with any loach. The (botia) loach species that I know can live alone are those that don't get along well with others. Hard to find a (botia) loach that is peaceful and also can be kept alone. (Well, of course, you can keep anything you want alone. I guess we mean those that do not like to mingle with others to be happy.)

I kept some type of Shistura loach alone and it was OK. When they are more than one, they have their little territory and have harmless bickerings - play tag fashion, but they don't swim around in a school.

If cooler water, you could find non-Botia species (like Barbatula) that can be kept alone. I used to collect Barbatula Angorae. They can bother fish like guppies, but they are generally OK, so I assume that genus have similar behavior.

If you are willing to expand this to loach-like fishes, you could consider Labeo species, flying fox or algae eaters. Gobies may also be an alternative.
 
  • Thread Starter

SouthAmericanCichlids

Member
veggieshark said:
Is this going to be a tropical temperature tank?

When you say loach, I immediately think botia loaches, but I suppose you are OK with any loach. The (botia) loach species that I know can live alone are those that don't get along well with others. Hard to find a (botia) loach that is peaceful and also can be kept alone. (Well, of course, you can keep anything you want alone. I guess we mean those that do not like to mingle with others to be happy.)

I kept some type of Shistura loach alone and it was OK. When they are more than one, they have their little territory and have harmless bickerings - play tag fashion, but they don't swim around in a school.

If cooler water, you could find non-Botia species (like Barbatula) that can be kept alone. I used to collect Barbatula Angorae. They can bother fish like guppies, but they are generally OK, so I assume that genus have similar behavior.

If you are willing to expand this to loach-like fishes, you could consider Labeo species, flying fox or algae eaters. Gobies may also be an alternative.
It is a tropical tank and the temperature can be raised. I currently have it at 84, but can be lowered to 78. It would have to live with angelfish and a BN pleco (Mine has been thriving and growing quickly at 84 degrees). And since I have my BN I don't really want any algae eaters because I don't have a job, so I don't really want to consistently buy zucchini. Though I do feed my BN veggie pellets, I don't believe veggie pellets are enough for an algae eater's diet.
 

veggieshark

Member
84 degrees is another tough condition for a loach, and one that will satisfy your other conditions. Sorry, I am out of ideas.
 
  • Thread Starter

SouthAmericanCichlids

Member
veggieshark said:
84 degrees is another tough condition for a loach, and one that will satisfy your other conditions. Sorry, I am out of ideas.
I was saying I can move it up to there, I have it there I can put it anywhere from 78-84 degrees.
 

veggieshark

Member
SouthAmericanCichlids said:
I was saying I can move it up to there, I have it there I can put it anywhere from 78-84 degrees.
78 would be around the upper boundary for the Shistura I was talking about. Too warm for the elongated loaches like Dojo's.
Small groups of peaceful Botia (they have all different scientific names now that I can't remember) loaches seem like the best option. Some of them can school together, so you can choose 1-3 from things like Sidthimunki's Dario's, Striatum's, Kubotai's. Now there may be the budget issue as they are not readily available in all stores.
 

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