So Proud Of This Java Fern On Driftwood

FloydtheBetta

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I went to the beach and found tons of little pieces of driftwood for my java ferns and Anubias the other day.

I boiled the pieces I liked the most 3 times to get most of the tannin, salt, and whatever else out of it, but 3 out of 4 pieces still wouldn’t sink so they had to be attached to rocks as well.

It was much harder than it sounds to get them attached to the wood with fishing wire (especially the ones that needed rocks). I was so flustered! But after a day of being in the tanks they all sink on their own.

That said I wanted to show off a java fern I did that I am so proud of!
 

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CocoCappuccino

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FloydtheBetta said:
I went to the beach and found tons of little pieces of driftwood for my java ferns and Anubias the other day.

I boiled the pieces I liked the most 3 times to get most of the tannin, salt, and whatever else out of it, but 3 out of 4 pieces still wouldn’t sink so they had to be attached to rocks as well.

It was much harder than it sounds to get them attached to the wood with fishing wire (especially the ones that needed rocks). I was so flustered! But after a day of being in the tanks they all sink on their own.

That said I wanted to show off a java fern I did that I am so proud of!
I was interested in getting some Java fern. Does it do better on driftwood rather than substrate?
 
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FloydtheBetta

FloydtheBetta

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CocoCappuccino said:
I was interested in getting some Java fern. Does it do better on driftwood rather than substrate?
kallililly1973 said:
java fern should always be tied to driftwood a rock or decoration for best results never bury it in the substrate, It feeds the same way an anubis and buce plants do
Yes it does! I believe either driftwood or a porous aquarium safe rock (lava rock for example) is recommended so the roots can work their way into the nooks and crannies to secure itself.

I believe it’s a very hardy plant so it can survive in the substrate usually as long as you don’t bury the rhizome but if you want to get the most of it I suggest driftwood!

If you need some pieces of driftwood and are near CalI I’d be happy to send you some— I have so much around the house from beach combing.
 

bitseriously

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Sometimes it does seem like it takes the hands of a surgeon, doesn't it?
I used crazy glue until recently, because I was never satisfied with the result of the fishing line work. But this last time I worked it out, though trial and error and persistence. Which you seem to have done the first time around, darn you!!
I found a couple sets of long nosed quality tweezers really help a lot.
 
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FloydtheBetta

FloydtheBetta

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bitseriously said:
Sometimes it does seem like it takes the hands of a surgeon, doesn't it?
I used crazy glue until recently, because I was never satisfied with the result of the fishing line work. But this last time I worked it out, though trial and error and persistence. Which you seem to have done the first time around, darn you!!
I found a couple sets of long nosed quality tweezers really help a lot.
Aww thank you! I did enlist some help and trust me, I almost gave up a few times, but I didn’t want to be defeated!

Also I agree! I ordered a little aquarium planting kit and it’s been super helpful!
 

bitseriously

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Sorry I should have been more clear on the tweezers. The ones I use are surgical grade, left over from my long-ago university years when I had to buy a dissection kit. The tips are like needles, but the overall size isn't much bigger than normal bathroom tweezers. They're great for getting under wraps of line to grab the last loop for tying off.
 

!poogs!

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IMG_3102.JPG


Nice job on the Java

Anybody ever tried this. I used it yesterday and I’m iffy on it.

IMG_3103.JPG


I did the same as you with fishing line, it can be a tough go.

IMG_3104.JPG
 

kallililly1973

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I use tiny clear elastics they are super stretchy and once the rhizome plant grows over it or attaches to the wood stone or deco you can reach in and snip the elastic... much easier than tying tiny string together
 
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FloydtheBetta

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!poogs! said:
IMG_3102.JPG


Nice job on the Java

Anybody ever tried this. I used it yesterday and I’m iffy on it.

IMG_3103.JPG


I did the same as you with fishing line, it can be a tough go.

IMG_3104.JPG
Thank you!

I thought about using some kind of glue but the concept scared me too much since I’m such a noob. I might go for it next time though because honestly that fishing line is hard.

bitseriously said:
Sorry I should have been more clear on the tweezers. The ones I use are surgical grade, left over from my long-ago university years when I had to buy a dissection kit. The tips are like needles, but the overall size isn't much bigger than normal bathroom tweezers. They're great for getting under wraps of line to grab the last loop for tying off.
Oh I see what you mean! That would be super helpful for making the loop tie off without getting loose!

kallililly1973 said:
I use tiny clear elastics they are super stretchy and once the rhizome plant grows over it or attaches to the wood stone or deco you can reach in and snip the elastic... much easier than tying tiny string together
That is genius. I have those too!
 

kallililly1973

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Black sewing thread also worked pretty good when I used it just cut a large piece tie a couple knots n cut the excess
 

bitseriously

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!poogs! said:
Anybody ever tried this. I used it yesterday and I’m iffy on it.
You can save yourself a ton of $ by just getting hardware store or big box super glue. Be sure to get the gel, made with cyanoacrylate. It’s the same thing as your seachem glue, at a fraction the cost.
However I avoid using it where the glue will be easily seen, for the exact reason you’ve discovered here; the white blobs do stand out a bit.
Smaller items like rock and wood fragments, esp those with crannies and crevices to hide the glue, work well for me. And use less overall.
Overall, I try to strike a reasonable balance between form and function. So, based on the combination of what plant I’m using and what I’m attaching it to, I might choose one of three ways to attach it: superglue (as you have done), small black zip ties (sometimes I have to attach two together to make them long enough), or fishing line.
 

!poogs!

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bitseriously said:
You can save yourself a ton of $ by just getting hardware store or big box super glue. Be sure to get the gel, made with cyanoacrylate. It’s the same thing as your seachem glue, at a fraction the cost.
However I avoid using it where the glue will be easily seen, for the exact reason you’ve discovered here; the white blobs do stand out a bit.
Smaller items like rock and wood fragments, esp those with crannies and crevices to hide the glue, work well for me. And use less overall.
Overall, I try to strike a reasonable balance between form and function. So, based on the combination of what plant I’m using and what I’m attaching it to, I might choose one of three ways to attach it: superglue (as you have done), small black zip ties (sometimes I have to attach two together to make them long enough), or fishing line.
Superglue was a first and an experiment, hoping as plants grow and roots expand, and adding more plants it become less noticeable, otherwise I’ve been using fishing line line the op
 

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!poogs! said:
IMG_3102.JPG


Nice job on the Java

Anybody ever tried this. I used it yesterday and I’m iffy on it.

IMG_3103.JPG


I did the same as you with fishing line, it can be a tough go.

IMG_3104.JPG
I use "gorilla super glue gell." Firstly though, dry the spot your going to put the glue and then just a tiny drop will suffice. Don't worry the white won't be noticeable for very long.
IMG_0273.JPG

On the right are 2 babies I just propagated from the mother plant and attached with Gorilla Glue. I think it's a much cleaner look. Don't forget to hold for 30sec.
 

Jack B Nimble

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I use the gorilla gel too for almost all mine plants above and below water.
 
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FloydtheBetta

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mlash said:
It looks great! Maybe some Java Moss on one as well to compliment the fern.
IMG_0274.JPG
I’ve been wanting to get some moss but didn’t know which one would be best for driftwood! I’ll have to order some— love the look!
 

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