So my daughter brought home a betta. Again

zenjordan

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She showed up with a fish in a cup and we resurrected an old 1 gallon tank that we had from years back when they were little. We tried several times previously and kept losing fish. I did not know about the nitrogen cycle, so there you have it. So this time around I did all my homework, learned about the nitrogen cycle, learned about the tank was too small, so I moved him into a 5 gallon tank, and then I got him a couple of snails to hang out with (I ordered one, two showed up at my door). Now the 5 gallon tank is too small because the snails grew like crazy, and I've got a 29 gallon tank coming next week. Mostly I am here to learn more about biological filtration, and figure out what kind of filter I need for the 29 gallon. Right now my intention is to not get any more animals except maybe a couple of ghost shrimp or cherry shrimp. I would like to keep a 29 gallon tank under populated because I am disabled and it's difficult for me to do frequent water changes. It is as equally difficult for me to arm twist the teenagers into doing them for me.
 

Sorg67

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I am a newbie so I have little to offer. I will be interested to hear what others say. I have learned a lot by following the threads of others.
 

fintasticTanks

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Biological filtration is the breakdown of fish food and other organic pollutants by harmless bacteria. The bacteria can be found in multiple places throughout the tank, although the bulk of it will be in your filter.

To reduce maintenance, add some plants such as Bacopa Caroliniana, Java moss, Java Fern, Water Wisteria, and Anubias (any Variety) Those are the plants I have in my 29 gallon betta tank. I would also add driftwood to improve the look of the tank. Plants also provide biological filtration

For a 29 gallon you have a few options in terms of filtration: Rankings are based on my experience and beliefs, what has worked for me might not work for you. I have used all these in a betta tank.

- Sponge Filters ---My choice---
- Sponge Filters will be your best bet, as they are designed to be used as biological and some mechanical filtration. Also, as you have a betta in the tank, slow flow would be appreciated. For your tank I would recommend a medium or large sponge filter. The filter will need an air pump.
1572469905826.png



- Hang-On-The-Back Filters (HoB):
- These would be your second best option for a betta tank. They are more complex than Sponge Filters, and require more maintenance. They also have more flow. A plus for these is that you can also add chemical filtration such as carbon or purigen, etc.
If you get this filter, I would recommend getting a popular brand name filter such as AquaClears or Marineland Penguins. There are others, but I can't think of them right now. You would want to get a filter that is rated somewhere around 30-55 gallons for your stocking.
1572470608716.png


- Ziss Filters
These are like sponge filters but prettier (in my opinion) However, they are hard to find. You might have to hunt online for them. Other than that, they should be as good as a sponge filter for your tank. Just be sure to get an actual Ziss Filter that isn't a fake.
1572470628129.png


- Canister Filters:
I would not get this for a betta tank, as they create too much flow. You also might find the cleaning process a pain. I don't, but given your circumstances, I would stay away from this type of filtration.

1572470663295.png


I hope this helps and please let me know what you think of this information. I would also like to know what you choose to do and how it works out for you.
 
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zenjordan

zenjordan

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fintasticTanks said:
Biological filtration is the breakdown of fish food and other organic pollutants by harmless bacteria. The bacteria can be found in multiple places throughout the tank, although the bulk of it will be in your filter.

To reduce maintenance, add some plants such as Bacopa Caroliniana, Java moss, Java Fern, Water Wisteria, and Anubias (any Variety) Those are the plants I have in my 29 gallon betta tank. I would also add driftwood to improve the look of the tank. Plants also provide biological filtration

For a 29 gallon you have a few options in terms of filtration: Rankings are based on my experience and beliefs, what has worked for me might not work for you. I have used all these in a betta tank.

- Sponge Filters ---My choice---
- Sponge Filters will be your best bet, as they are designed to be used as biological and some mechanical filtration. Also, as you have a betta in the tank, slow flow would be appreciated. For your tank I would recommend a medium or large sponge filter. The filter will need an air pump.
1572469905826.png



- Hang-On-The-Back Filters (HoB):
- These would be your second best option for a betta tank. They are more complex than Sponge Filters, and require more maintenance. They also have more flow. A plus for these is that you can also add chemical filtration such as carbon or purigen, etc.
If you get this filter, I would recommend getting a popular brand name filter such as AquaClears or Marineland Penguins. There are others, but I can't think of them right now. You would want to get a filter that is rated somewhere around 30-55 gallons for your stocking.
1572470608716.png


- Ziss Filters
These are like sponge filters but prettier (in my opinion) However, they are hard to find. You might have to hunt online for them. Other than that, they should be as good as a sponge filter for your tank. Just be sure to get an actual Ziss Filter that isn't a fake.
1572470628129.png


- Canister Filters:
I would not get this for a betta tank, as they create too much flow. You also might find the cleaning process a pain. I don't, but given your circumstances, I would stay away from this type of filtration.

1572470663295.png


I hope this helps and please let me know what you think of this information. I would also like to know what you choose to do and how it works out for you.
Thank you so much! You have given me much food for thought. I will absolutely post when I figure it out. The tank will be here early next week I'm gonna start setting it up. I want to do a full nitrogen cycle on it before I put the fish in it. I'm really excited about it! This little 5 gallon tank is getting a little crowded I think with the snails getting big.
 

Dch48

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The 5 would be fine to keep the Betta in. Just get rid of most of the snails. Sometimes the Male Splendens Bettas do better in smaller tanks.
 

Craig_84

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Agree with getting rid of some snails. I added a few snails at one point (ramshorn) and ended up with about a hundred in no time at all. Assassin snails made light work of the problem for me and I had to do very little... well apart from trying to find them after the ate the other snails as they burrow when not in action.

As for adding shrimp Amano shrimp work very well as a clean up crew. Just a thought
 

MissNoodle

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Id say ghost shrimp over cherries with a betta :) cherries are small, though beautiful, but make for a pricey snack to many fish... bettas love hunting lol

Adult ghost shrimp are too large to be snacked on if healthy. And they are great at cleaning scraps in the tank, so they could help maintain some of the cleanliness.
 

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