So I bought a 250w heater...

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JustMe

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I bought a 250 watt heater over the weekend, and it didn't come with instructions nor box. It's an EBO-JAGER heater. After looking online, I think it's an older version since it has a green top and it doesn't have anything about EHEIM printed on it (the newer ones do). The top has a power control knob, with numbers ranging from 1 to 8, if I recall correctly.

I plan to use this for a 10gal aquarium, and I need a temperature of around 80 degrees F. Besides relying on a strip thermometer, what power level would you say I should set it to? Would a 250w be overkill for a 10gal? Any tips and suggestions will be appreciated. Thanks much.
 

ryanr

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Besides relying on a strip thermometer
I would strongly recommend getting a more accurate glass thermometer

Also, are there any identifying numbers etc on the heater, you could possibly google the model number to find a manual.

If not, then I would start at the bottom and heat the tank gradually, increasing the power every 24 hrs until you find the right temperature balance.

Cheers.
 
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JustMe

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Thanks for the info all. I'm thinking if I set it to the lowest temperature, it'll be suitable for a 10gal tank. I tried looking online for the manual, but no suffice. I'll just set it low and raise the power level over time, and I'll keep a close eye on the temperature.

I'll grab a submersible glass thermometer too Are the ones that use suction cups and stick to the side any better than the ones that sink to the bottom?
 

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The ones with suction cups (IMO) are better because they allow you to place the thermometer anywhere in the aquarium and at any level.

They also keep the thermometer in place, so it's not hard to view the reading at any time.

Just my opinion, I don't think one is better/more accurate than the other, more personal preference.

Oh, and just be sure you're confident of the temp before you adjust the heater further. Keeping in mind that lights 'can' influence the temp, but a 10G tank should be stable after about 24-26 hrs.
 
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JustMe

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Thanks for the tips ryanr, I decided to grab a thermometer w/ suction cups .

So last night I stuck the thermometer to the corner of my tank, and it was about 22 degrees C.

I set the power setting of the heater on the lowest level (1), and I fully submerse it by laying it down horizontally on the gravel bed. I plug it in...and nothing happens.

I know these things work like air conditioning...if the water temperature is equal to or greater than the set temperature, the heater will shut off- as you can tell by the little light that turns on and off.

I turn the power level to moderate (5), and plug it in. The light turns on and I wait for a bit. The temperatures moves up, but barely. I waited until the light shut off and felt the water...and it still felt pretty cool.

I turn the power level to high (9), and plug it. The light turns on and again...I wait until it turns off. The temperature moves up to about 78 degrees F...but it SHOULD be around 93 degrees F. I put my hand in the water and it was still pretty cold...but then again I don't know how 80 degrees F water feels like (which is what I need). The highest temperature range is in the low 90s as stated by the manufacturer, and that's what I should have on the highest power setting.


I've never used a heater before, so I'm getting frustrated...aren't these things supposed to heat until they reach the set temperature, and then shut off? Or do they work by turning on and off and reach the temperature slowly? I'm using a 250w heater for a TEN GALLON tank...I would expect the water temperature to increase fairly rapidly...unless I should give it a few days to warm up the water? I've heard so many good reviews about the accurate temperature, how these are the top of line heaters, how they last years and years...but this is turning out to be a waste of money. The one I bought was used, it has a white substance inside the casing, but I don't think that makes such a big impact...the pilot light still turns on and off...so it must be heating to some set temperature. Some people said they've used these heaters for years and there's no heat loss over time. Am I doing something wrong?
 

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Don't get frustrated

The heaters are designed to gradually increase temperatures so as not to thermal shock your fish, and probably more importantly, to ensure an even distribution of heat.

The heater will come on for a little bit, do some heating, then switch off. The heated water transfers around the tank, and the thermostat in the heater goes 'not warm enough yet', heat some more, so and so forth [yes I know heaters can't talk ]

Keeping in mind that the water around the heater will be warmer, and can also trip the thermostat.

With this in mind, that's why I suggested waiting 24hrs before re-adjusting the heater.

Hope this helps.

And please, stick with it, you'll get the hang of it. Aquariums are the world's greatest test of patience, in all aspects
 
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JustMe

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Haha thanks rynar, the info was enlightening. I was expecting it to heat until it reached the set temperature.

It turns out that my heater is trash...now when I plug it in...the light doesn't even come on anymore. I'm gonna take it apart and see if I can do anything about it.
 

Tanman19az

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I bought a 100 watt heater for my 10 gallon and I took it back for a 50 watt cuz the 100 watt was a complete eye sore in the tank. It took up the whole tank! good luck with 250 watt eye sore
 
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I bought a 100 watt heater for my 10 gallon and I took it back for a 50 watt cuz the 100 watt was a complete eye sore in the tank. It took up the whole tank! good luck with 250 watt eye sore
I know what you mean...the heater can't fit vertically, and barely fits horizontally.
 

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I would take the heater out and buy a small one keep that ebo heater they are really good especially the older green ones. I do believe those were German made and were the best. I used them for discus and saw them being faded out and was upset because the new ones are good but I think the older ones were more precise and had a lower price tag at that time too..

but for a 10 gallon tank I would say no bigger than 100 watt and if you can find one of those cheap hang on the back ones. old school for sure but don't spend 30+ dollars on a submersible heater for a 10g unless you have too. for me the cheaper the hobby the more enjoyable..
 
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