Snake for 55g tank

Discussion in 'Reptiles' started by jenema, Aug 10, 2015.

  1. jenemaValued MemberMember

    So I was considering taking down my 10g aquarium (which just has a female betta in it right now) and getting a Kenyan Sand Boa. But then I remembered that I have a 55g tank sitting around that is empty. I haven't had a snake since I was 10 years old so I know I little bit but still a newbie. Obviously tons of research will be done on my part but any advice is welcome. I've heard conflicting things about weather a tank can be "too big" for a snake. Is this true?
    Bottom line I'm trying to decide if it will be worth it to use a 55 or take down my 10. Also if I do go with the 55 what snake to get.
    I would like something that can be handled a couple times a week, something that will eat frozen/thawed rodents, and is on the easier side when it comes the habitat. I'm thinking that with the 55 I need something that needs a drier climate because humidity will be harder to control (correct me if I'm wrong).
    Thanks for reading all of this :p and in advance for any suggestions and advice.

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  2. TexasDomer

    TexasDomerFishlore LegendMember

    How about a ball python? A 10 gal might be a bit too small (and you don't want to have to displace your betta) and the 55 gal is too big. A 20 gal long would do nicely though. Just give him/her lots of hiding places!
     
  3. OP
    OP
    j

    jenemaValued MemberMember

    Was thinking a ball python but I heard they're picky eaters sometimes so I'm not sure it would be the best choice for a "first" snake. I would only put a Kenyan Sand Boa in the 10g. But I was hoping to see if there was anything big enough to go in the 55g so I wouldn't have to take down the 10g (I have a 5g the betta can go in). I don't want to buy another tank.

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  4. TexasDomer

    TexasDomerFishlore LegendMember

    If you're looking for a "first" beginner-type snake, I would stick with something small, not something that would fill out the 55 gal. Bally pythons are great first snakes, but it sounds like you've made up your mind about the Kenyan Sand Boa. They are beautiful! I would get an adult though, as I've heard juvies require live pinkies.
     




  5. OP
    OP
    j

    jenemaValued MemberMember

    Thanks for the advice after a lot of thought I've decided to sell my 55g and get a 20L for either a ball python or a corn snake.

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  6. TexasDomer

    TexasDomerFishlore LegendMember

    Sounds good! I think you'd be okay with a Kenyan Sand Boa too, if you wanted one :) They'd be okay in the 20 gal too, again as long as you provide lots of hiding places. Corn snakes would be pretty easy though...
     
  7. OP
    OP
    j

    jenemaValued MemberMember

    Well I've been putting a lot of thought into it and doing a lot of research and am now leaning towards a ball python. I like the idea of a calmer snake. Would a ball python be able to live its life in a 20L or would I need to get something bigger?

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  8. TexasDomer

    TexasDomerFishlore LegendMember

    A 20 long would be fine for a small ball python! Bally pythons (and many snakes in general) prefer smaller, confined areas - it makes them feel more safe. A 20 L with lots of hiding places would make a ball python feel safe. You would need larger for a larger snake (like a red-tailed boa or white-lipped python) though.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    j

    jenemaValued MemberMember

    Awesome thanks for the advice. If I go that route I'll get a male so it will say a little smaller.

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  10. TexasDomer

    TexasDomerFishlore LegendMember

    That sounds great! Good luck!
     
  11. Irish Eyes

    Irish EyesNew MemberMember

    I'm surprised no one has mentioned Corn Snakes. They come in countless color and genetic morphs, are generally inexpensive to purchase, much easier to care for than many snake species, and would usually fit nicely in a 20 gallon long habitat.

    For 55 gallon habitat, you could go with Ball Pythons, although they are rarely active enough to use that kind of space--most of them are happy to live in tubs on rack systems. Some snakes I have that do nicely in a 55 include Black Milksnakes, many Boa Constrictor species, full grown Corn Snakes, and king snakes. Most of which tend to be friendly species and fairly easy to care for. Just be sure to research how the species you're thinking of likes to get their heat, substrate, humidity, and exercise. Most of these like under tank heaters on one half of their habitat, but some, like Ball Pythons, also like to have a place where they can bask at a higher temperature. Just be sure not to use one of those "heat rocks" Lots of herps have been burned or even killed by those. Some snakes like to climb a bit. My Corns and Black Milksnake all enjoy something to climb on, whereas my Lipstick Sunglow Boa and my Ball Python like to have a big container to soak in. You get the idea. Each species, and even each individual, has different needs and preferences. The one thing I would recommend is feeding frozen/thawed, only, no matter which species you choose. No live rodents. Live rodents have been known to injure or even kill the snakes who were supposed to make a meal of them.
     
  12. OP
    OP
    j

    jenemaValued MemberMember

    I'm actually still really indecisive between a ball python and corn snake. Of course I do tons of research on any pet I get beforehand. I like corn snakes a lot, especially the consistency of them eating. But I like that ball pythons tend to be less active when you handle them.

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  13. TexasDomer

    TexasDomerFishlore LegendMember

    I mentioned corn snake in #6 :)

    They are great too, but some people prefer pythons to corn snakes because they're more exotic and they ball around your hand/arm while holding them. Both are great beginner snakes. Glad you're doing your research!
     
  14. Briannab

    BriannabValued MemberMember

    I am also think of getting another snake because my corn snake passed :( i was also thinking of a ball python!

    Another option ( if you want a big snake that isn't TOO big ) you could keep a dumerils boa in the 55 gallon. They have really good temperaments and personality.
     
  15. OP
    OP
    j

    jenemaValued MemberMember

    To anyone wondering, I went with a ball python. Meet Balthazar. I couldn't be happier with him! He's the best.

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    Attached Files:

  16. Avaismyfava1

    Avaismyfava1Valued MemberMember

    A corn snake would probably work with lots of hides and stuff
     
  17. Nadiboy

    NadiboyValued MemberMember

    Pretty snake.
    Don't listen to people that say a tank can be TOO BIG for a snake!!!! That's ridiculous and awful. A properly set up enclosure CAN'T be too big. EVER
     
  18. ShadowKittyCat

    ShadowKittyCatWell Known MemberMember

    Oh he looks amazing!

    Do you know the name of the morph he is?

    And if ever you would want another, I recommend checking out SnakeBytesTV on YouTube. They sell snakes, and they have many different morphs. The older videos are much better though.
     
  19. OP
    OP
    j

    jenemaValued MemberMember

    He's a pinstripe

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  20. aliray

    alirayFishlore VIPMember

    Thank you and I agree 100%. A snake in the wild goes when and where he wants to into a hole or cave or under something when he wants , but it is his option, not just because he is forced to live in a tiny space where he has no choice. I have never understood how they can even exercise their muscles at all in those rack systems. Just my personal opinionTo me it equates with a goldfish in a gallon fish bowl. End of my rant;)Alison
     




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