Small pond fish

BRDrew

Member
Hey fishlore.

Last time I was going for a breeding project that was unfortunately postponed due to the pandemic. This time I come to you with an odd question.

I'm "curating" the new stock for a used-to-be-duck pond near where I live. First I considered koi, for obvious reasons. However, I found out that the pond in question was previously stocked with koi, which were promptly eaten by a local population of otters. They seem uninterested in some swordtails that are in there.

What fish would you put in the pond? Otter-proof fish if you will.
 

mimo91088

Member
If you're in Brazil and my totally uneducated guess at your climate is correct, I bet it's pretty warm there? If so you could probably do some cool cichlids or something.
 

jake37

Member
guppies, if winter temp is above 72 and summer below 81 apistogramma or kribs. I'm not sure anything is otter proof - the presumption is otter will leave something small alone but if they get hungry enough ... - also how deep is the pond and does it matter if the fish stays near the bottom.
 
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BRDrew

Member
mimo91088 said:
If you're in Brazil and my totally uneducated guess at your climate is correct, I bet it's pretty warm there? If so you could probably do some cool cichlids or something.
It is indeed pretty warm, however most people underestimate how cold it can get. Due to the dense tree coverage in the area the temperatures will drop to about 50f on the coldest days. And believe it or not I've seen angelfish at those temps.

Cichlids are a cool idea, but I don't know much about them. What would you suggest specifically?

jake37 said:
guppies, if winter temp is above 72 and summer below 81 apistogramma or kribs. I'm not sure anything is otter proof - the presumption is otter will leave something small alone but if they get hungry enough ... - also how deep is the pond and does it matter if the fish stays near the bottom.
I thought about guppies but I wanted to explore different options before I landed on them.

I believe the bond is around 5-6ft at it's deepest, but the banks are maybe 1.5ft at most. I think as long as the fish are visible it shouldn't matter that they are near the bottom.
 

jake37

Member
The air temp might get to 52 but the water temp is more important. The ground will add some what a buffer esp if it warms up during the day. apistogramma are pretty hearty as are kribs. Kribs are technically african but in most ways somewhat similar to appistogramma. The advantage of kribs is they will self populate as they take care of feeding and raising their off springs. The thing is that kribs will spend most of their time in the bottom foot of water. apistogramma might come up looking for food but again spend a fair amount of time near the bottom. kribs get to around 4 inches for the male 3 for the female. apistogramma depends on the specific speciies but typically 3 for the male and 2 for the female. Some are a bit smaller.

BRDrew said:
I thought about guppies but I wanted to explore different options before I landed on them.

I believe the bond is around 5-6ft at it's deepest, but the banks are maybe 1.5ft at most. I think as long as the fish are visible it shouldn't matter that they are near the bottom.
 

mimo91088

Member
You know what, forget cichlids. Now that I think about it, I'd absolutely kill for a fancy guppy pond lol.
 

jake37

Member
Yea just watch them otters shred their tails


mimo91088 said:
You know what, forget cichlids. Now that I think about it, I'd absolutely kill for a fancy guppy pond lol.
 

Lakefish

Member
Paradise fish! They'd have no problem with the temperature and they do hang out nearer the surface mostly.
 
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BRDrew

Member
jake37 said:
Yea just watch them otters shred their tails
That's an easy fix. We get crowntail guppies
 

mimo91088

Member
BRDrew said:
That's an easy fix. We get crowntail guppies
And a pellet gun.
 
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BRDrew

Member
Lakefish said:
Paradise fish! They'd have no problem with the temperature and they do hang out nearer the surface mostly.
Thats a fun idea. Do you think they would be fine as far as feeding goes? I worry the pond could get a little neglected.
 

Lakefish

Member
As long as there are bugs around, they should be fine. I stuck a couple in my pond this summer, and the most I've done is give them a few mosquito larvae once a week or so. If you don't have an excessive number of fish in there, they won't need much feeding. Even less so when the water gets cold.
 

jake37

Member
Just don't let them escape as they are not native to south america....

Lakefish said:
As long as there are bugs around, they should be fine. I stuck a couple in my pond this summer, and the most I've done is give them a few mosquito larvae once a week or so. If you don't have an excessive number of fish in there, they won't need much feeding. Even less so when the water gets cold.
 

qldmick

Member
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BRDrew

Member
Hey guys, thank you for the advice. I'll be going to the pond on the next few days, and visiting some local LFSs to check availability of fish. I think fancy guppies will porbably be the prime candidates and maybe a pair os apistos for a little population control and to have something different in there.
 

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