Shrimp Tank Necessities 5 Gallon Tank 

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Flufeeh

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sirdarksol

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Shrimp can live in temperate water, so they don't need a heater. The kit has a filter, which will provide gas exchange, so you don't need an airstone (though one wouldn't hurt).
Java moss is the best friend of most shrimp.

About all you'll need are the consumables (food and dechlor)
 
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sirdarksol said:
Shrimp can live in temperate water, so they don't need a heater. The kit has a filter, which will provide gas exchange, so you don't need an airstone (though one wouldn't hurt).
Java moss is the best friend of most shrimp.

About all you'll need are the consumables (food and dechlor)
Will it benefit or make their lives better if I get an airstone? I've also heard that they thrive more in the 70s range, is this true?
 

jetajockey

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i LOVE those minibow tanks, I'm seriously considering getting one to put on my bar.

My shrimp seem to like calm water more than fast water. I personally wouldn't bother.

As far as the heater thing goes, I'm with sirdarksol, I don't use heaters in general anyhow, but I guess it would really depend on what kind of ambient temperature your tank is going to be in, and whether it has a big fluctuation. I'd set it up and check the temp every few hours and if it varies more than just a few degrees then I'd consider getting a heater.
 
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jetajockey said:
i LOVE those minibow tanks, I'm seriously considering getting one to put on my bar.

My shrimp seem to like calm water more than fast water. I personally wouldn't bother.

As far as the heater thing goes, I'm with sirdarksol, I don't use heaters in general anyhow, but I guess it would really depend on what kind of ambient temperature your tank is going to be in, and whether it has a big fluctuation. I'd set it up and check the temp every few hours and if it varies more than just a few degrees then I'd consider getting a heater.
I'm in NYC, but the heat is on in the winter and the summer is hot too. I'll check it out. If it is a problem, what size do I get? I don't want it to be huge and detract from the focal of the tank.
 

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Make sure you somehow slow the outflow from the filter. Without the bit of quilting batting the shrimp get blown around like a cow in a tornado.

With plants, especially mosses, you won't really need to feed them.

-Lisa
 
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Kunsthure said:
Make sure you somehow slow the outflow from the filter. Without the bit of quilting batting the shrimp get blown around like a cow in a tornado.

With plants, especially mosses, you won't really need to feed them.

-Lisa
Will it have some kind of built in switch I can control it with? Or do I have to do some DIY stuff?
 

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I suppose stuffing the output with a bunch of filter media will work...also, slipping a piece of sponge filter media over the intake tube will prevent baby shrimp from being sucked in and filleted.

Personally, I prefer a heater, as shrimp are even more sensitive to water conditions than fish, and, especially if you're rasing Neocaridina sp., they like tropical temperatures, around 74 degrees. Shrimp easily die in unstable temperatures.
 
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Elodea said:
I suppose stuffing the output with a bunch of filter media will work...also, slipping a piece of sponge filter media over the intake tube will prevent baby shrimp from being sucked in and filleted.

Personally, I prefer a heater, as shrimp are even more sensitive to water conditions than fish, and, especially if you're rasing Neocaridina sp., they like tropical temperatures, around 74 degrees. Shrimp easily die in unstable temperatures.
Ok, thanks. I'll just be getting RCS this time around.
 

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I have a colony of cherry shrimp that seem to have no problems in a tank that's at the mid sixties. They breed, they have a nice, bright color, and they are plenty active.
These shrimp are an offshoot of those that live in Japanese swamps, many of which are in areas that can get very cold in the winter.
 
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sirdarksol said:
I have a colony of cherry shrimp that seem to have no problems in a tank that's at the mid sixties. They breed, they have a nice, bright color, and they are plenty active.
These shrimp are an offshoot of those that live in Japanese swamps, many of which are in areas that can get very cold in the winter.
They breed in the 60s? That's interesting. I'll see what sizes they have for the heaters, if they're small enough I'll be getting one if not.. I still have about 6 more weeks until I put the shrimp in. First time I'll be doing fishless cycling.
 

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Flufeeh said:
They breed in the 60s? That's interesting. I'll see what sizes they have for the heaters, if they're small enough I'll be getting one if not.. I still have about 6 more weeks until I put the shrimp in. First time I'll be doing fishless cycling.
Mid sixties, but yep. I haven't had any sudden die-offs either, and there were a few weeks in spring where my house shifted from 60 degrees to 80 degrees over the course of a day.
Most inverts are more resistant to temperature changes than fish from the same areas. Their bodies are simple, and this allows them to handle things like drops or spikes in temp (though you don't want it to be instant; netting them and dropping them in water that's ten degrees different is a bad idea). Some inverts can actually survive prolonged freezing with few ill effects.
They are more sensitive to poor water quality, though. Nitrates can be very deadly to shrimp, while they're only stressful to most fish.
 
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sirdarksol said:
Mid sixties, but yep. I haven't had any sudden die-offs either, and there were a few weeks in spring where my house shifted from 60 degrees to 80 degrees over the course of a day.
Most inverts are more resistant to temperature changes than fish from the same areas. Their bodies are simple, and this allows them to handle things like drops or spikes in temp (though you don't want it to be instant; netting them and dropping them in water that's ten degrees different is a bad idea). Some inverts can actually survive prolonged freezing with few ill effects.
They are more sensitive to poor water quality, though. Nitrates can be very deadly to shrimp, while they're only stressful to most fish.
Thanks, I'll have to stay on top of the water changes then.

I'm starting to get worried that the 15 watt incandescent bulb will not be enough for Java Moss or Anubias or is it ok?
 

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Check this out. I've had this bulb in my 10 gallon for years (just one bulb, haven't changed it out) and my anubias is doing great. I just added Java moss to the tank, and it's sending out strands of new growth, so I'd say that this will do the job. ;D
While it's only 10W, it will produce more light than the 15W incandescent.
 
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sirdarksol said:
Check this out. I've had this bulb in my 10 gallon for years (just one bulb, haven't changed it out) and my anubias is doing great. I just added Java moss to the tank, and it's sending out strands of new growth, so I'd say that this will do the job. ;D
While it's only 10W, it will produce more light than the 15W incandescent.
Awesome. I'll see if any of the LFS around here have a light similar to that, the incandescent just looks really weak. I guess I can test it out with some plants. Won't be much of a big loss.
 

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Another place to check would be hardware stores. If you can find a grow light of 15W or less that will fit in the space, it will serve the same function as the coralife colormax lamps.
 
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sirdarksol said:
Another place to check would be hardware stores. If you can find a grow light of 15W or less that will fit in the space, it will serve the same function as the coralife colormax lamps.
I went to the store today and sadly they only had incadescent. I got the 25 watt (only 3 dollars, no biggie) and it's not much of a difference. The person there told me that compact fluorescent will not fit in the socket I have, and that only incandescent bulbs will fit in there? Is this true?
 

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if you have a standard screw in incandescent hood, you can get some screw in fluoro bulbs made specifically for aquariums (the bulb shape fits in the hood space very well), they sell them at walmart in the fish section. I'm not sure what the wattage is on them (i think they are 10w each) but they work great in my lowlight setup.
 

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They make compact fluorescents for almost every shape of socket. I can actually get them for several types of halogen setups. Whoever told you that had no idea what they were talking about.
 
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Oh ok, thanks. I have a few compact fluorescent at home, actually. The one that is in my hand right now says 13W, 120VAC, and 60Hz. It also has a CAUTION: stating "Risk of electric shock- do not use where directly exposed to water- not for use with dimmers."

So I'm guessing I can't use this? Or is that warning on all of them? It is not like the colormax light bulb in shape, it's curvy and circular like this one:

668.jpg
 
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