shrimp in tanks

jeniferdwn

Valued Member
Messages
130
Reaction score
0
Points
111
Experience
More than 10 years
I am not an expert by any means, but I wanted to post somthing I just heard from the pet store guy. He is very knowledgeable about fish and birds. He's got the oldest pet shop in the state from what he says. I asked about his prices on shrimp. Well, his bad thing is that he can't give you a quick answer. He wanted to know what size tank, what else is in it, and how long it's been set up. He said the tank has to run and age for about 8 weeks with fish in it to set up the right amount of bacteria and all (after that, he'll even take the fish back). They can live by themselves in the tank after you have it aged. I've read several posts on shrimp dying, so this may be something to think about. I also know that I have set some up sooner before and everything has been alright, so I don't know a definite answer. Like I said before, he is very good at what he does, but it's his way or it's wrong. Just something for you all to think about since I've read some are loosing shrimp.
 

jetajockey

Fishlore VIP
Messages
6,753
Reaction score
92
Points
293
Experience
More than 10 years
It sounds like he has a simplified explanation (or understanding) of the nitrogen cycle. Either way he does sound concerned with the creatures well being which is becoming rare in the industry
 

Meenu

Fishlore VIP
Messages
7,278
Reaction score
80
Points
283
Experience
1 year
I am not an expert by any means, but I wanted to post somthing I just heard from the pet store guy. He is very knowledgeable about fish and birds. He's got the oldest pet shop in the state from what he says. I asked about his prices on shrimp. Well, his bad thing is that he can't give you a quick answer. No, that's a good thing! He wanted to know what size tank, what else is in it, and how long it's been set up. He's trying to establish whether or not the tank is cycled. He said the tank has to run and age for about 8 weeks with fish in it to set up the right amount of bacteria and all (after that, he'll even take the fish back). This is good and bad - he knows about cycling, but I'd prefer if he told people about fishless cycling rather than offering to take the fish back. Still, MUCH better than any store I've been to. They can live by themselves in the tank after you have it aged. I've read several posts on shrimp dying, so this may be something to think about. I also know that I have set some up sooner before and everything has been alright, so I don't know a definite answer. Like I said before, he is very good at what he does, but it's his way or it's wrong. Just something for you all to think about since I've read some are loosing shrimp.
I added comments in red. Overall, this guy seems to have the right idea. I love that he asks questions and educates.
 

sirdarksol

Fishlore Legend
Messages
13,174
Reaction score
236
Points
383
Experience
3 years
I don't think he's just talking about nitrogen cycle.
Shrimp need micro-flora and micro-fauna to survive. They can feed on things like pellets and flakes that sink, but they do much better if they get live food, like algae and the little critters that live in our tanks.
Some shrimp need this more than others. All filter feeders, for example, need very mature tanks.
Come to think of it, the only time I've ever lost a shrimp colony is when I've put them in new aquaria.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #5

jeniferdwn

Valued Member
Messages
130
Reaction score
0
Points
111
Experience
More than 10 years
I didn't mean to sound like I didn't appreciate his advice. He really is an expert on animals. Sometimes he comes across as obnoxious becuase if he doesn't think it's right or a good idea, he wont sell you what you want. I do get his advice on lots of pet questions. There is another guy at another pet store here that will tell you all you need to know if you ask. He isn't as pushy, but he knows his aquarium stuff. Glad I have 2 experts to ask locally and now all my new FishLore friends!
I know about cycling the tank for fish, but I really didn't think about it for snails and or shrimp. I was just goin to put some shrimp in my 2 gallon tank, but I may get a couple neon tetras and keep them for a ocuple of weeks and then add the shrimp.
 

Elodea

Well Known Member
Messages
2,425
Reaction score
48
Points
143
Experience
4 years
A 2 gallon tank really isn't suitable for any fish, not even a betta. Neon tetras need swim space and belong in a tank at least 10 gallons in size. Even a betta needs a 2.5-3 gallon tank, a 5 gallon tank being much better. If you wanted the tetras to cycle the tank, why not fishlessly cycle it and not cause any harm to the fish? Click the link in my signature to learn about the ways to fishlessly cycle.

There are many different species of shrimp, but all are very sensitive to water parameters, so a cycled tank is a must. For such a small 2 gallon tank, I really can't suggest anything apart from Red Cherry Shrimp and Ghost Shrimp. As I mentioned before, if you want neon tetras and shrimp, a 10 gallon aquarium will suffice.

Red cherry shrimp only grow to 1" long, and are a perfect candidate for your tank. I would stock about 15 in there, and that would fully stock the tank. Red cherry shrimp feed on algae and fish food, though real algae grown outside in a jar would be the best because it contains not only real algae, but all those little protists and bacteria and bugs that swim around within it, and those make a delicious meal for the shrimp.

Ghost shrimp grow a bit larger, and can only be stocked to a max of 10 in the tank. They are more carnivorous than the algae-eating cherry shrimp, and would do well on fish food, especially sinking bottom-feeder pellets. They do not eat algae, so do not feed them any algae that may be used to feed the cherry shrimp, as they might pick on it, but never eat too much.

Again, never mix shrimp species. Ghost shrimp are mean enough to eat baby cherry shrimp, and mixing just doesn't do well.

I hope you find the right shrimp for you tank, even better, get a larger aquarium so that the fish and shrimp could coexist happily.
 

sirdarksol

Fishlore Legend
Messages
13,174
Reaction score
236
Points
383
Experience
3 years
Excellent advice, Elodea, except that the fishless cycle still won't help the issue that the pet store owner is talking about. Like I said above, I think he's talking about a tank needing the micro-flora and -fauna to feed the shrimp. Sadly, I'm not entirely sure how to mollify him on that particular point, as the tank is too small to keep pretty much any fish.

The other caridinia and neocaridinia species of shrimp would also do well in that tank.
 
Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom