Should i try to tweak my tap parameters or just let livestock adjust?

baph0meat

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i have an aaaaaaalmost cycled moderately planted 30L tank and i am trying to get my water parameters figured out and stable before i add shrimp and a snail in the next week or two. decor is one large piece of found driftwood (heavily boiled + soaked), one small piece of driftwood from my LFS (not sure what kind, it’s very very dark) and two small pieces of dragonstone. i’m planning on a betta weeks from now, but the first batch i’ll be adding is a nerite snail and some amanos and tiger shrimp.

my tap water tests 7.5 out of the faucet and after letting it sit overnight it still tests roughly 7.5 (a little darker, but not all the way to 8), but my tank which has been running for a month tests at 8. my water is very hard, 180 GH and 180 KH. (this makes me particularly nervous about the tiger shrimp.) i’m not sure what’s making the ph rise since my understanding is dragon stone should be inert, and i don’t remember the brand my substrate is but i don’t remember anything on the packaging mentioning it could change parameters.

i can’t realistically afford to set up an RO system, but i have a brita filtered pitcher and the filtered water from the brita tests at 6.0 ph, 30 GH, and 120 KH.

i’m going to do a huge water change before i add livestock and i’m wondering if that’s an opportunity to try out refilling the tank with a mix of 50/50 filtered brita water and tap, which tests at 7.0 ph and slightly lowered hardness, and then just continuing to use that mix for water changes from then on. it would be kind of tedious because the brita only holds about a liter at a time and i have to wait for it to all trickle down, but it’s not a dealbreaker since my tank is so small.

would it be worth it to do that to try to get my water parameters closer to what my livestock is supposed to do best in? or am i just setting myself up for more opportunities for inconsistency, and it would be better to just hope my livestock adjusts to my tap water? i’ve seen it advised that it’s usually better not to fuss around with a bunch of water additives and stuff if you don’t strictly need to, but i’m not sure if that advice would still apply in this case where i’m not adding any products, just going through an extra (and admittedly tedious) step. because shrimp can be delicate and i know consistency is important to them, i don’t want to experiment with this once they’re IN the tank, and would rather make a decision about what i’m going to do and have it set up and regular before i buy them.
 

MacZ

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Better let the animals adjust to the parameters. As long as the parameters are stable it's fine. Chasing pH and hardness is a bit like playing with fire. It can be really hard to provide lower pH and hardness constantly under these circumstances. You would always have to be prepared for the case the tech doesn't work. Easier to adjust them once to your parameters than the other way round.

Question if it's even possible to acclimate all your planned animals. But I'm not a shrimp keepers, so this is something for the specialists.
 
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baph0meat

baph0meat

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that makes sense, thanks for the answer! stability was the biggest thing making me hesitate about the brita idea — the filter on the pitcher wearing out over time, having to exactly measure half and half for water changes, etc...
 

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