Should I thaw frozen cubes?

Redroofinn

I feed all my tanks Omega One frozen foods 2x per week. Bloodworms one day and brine shrimp the other. Flakes and pellets are the staple. I was at my LFS today and got for the first time "Omega One Frozen Freshwater Community Formula" just to offer my fish even more variety in their diets. Inside the package there is a little piece of paper that says "Attention please DO NOT thaw. Put directly in tank." I'm curious if anyone has used this specific food before and knows why it says not to thaw. I thaw the bloodworms and brine shrimp prior to feeding.
 

Cheesecake

I feed all my tanks Omega One frozen foods 2x per week. Bloodworms one day and brine shrimp the other. Flakes and pellets are the staple. I was at my LFS today and got for the first time "Omega One Frozen Freshwater Community Formula" just to offer my fish even more variety in their diets. Inside the package there is a little piece of paper that says "Attention please DO NOT thaw. Put directly in tank." I'm curious if anyone has used this specific food before and knows why it says not to thaw. I thaw the bloodworms and brine shrimp prior to feeding.

Frozen food pellets like this thaw in the water.
If you thaw them then all of the worms/shrimps will fall to the bottom and get lost (at least they did when I thawed some awhile back as an experiment). The fish will still eat the ones they find, but keeping them frozen prevents any food from being wasted.
 

BigManAquatics

Typically what i do with my frozen food is either just throw it in frozen or put it in a net and let it thaw out a bit in the tank, then let them loose.
 

Cheesecake

Typically what i do with my frozen food is either just throw it in frozen or put it in a net and let it thaw out a bit in the tank, then let them loose.

Haha I got to the unanswered thread first :p.
 

Redroofinn

Thanks for the answers! I just found it interesting that their bloodworms and brine shrimp have no warning saying NOT to thaw but that this community formula specifically said to place in tank while frozen. But I think what Cheesecake said makes sense.
 

BigManAquatics

Thanks for the answers! I just found it interesting that their bloodworms and brine shrimp have no warning saying NOT to thaw but that this community formula specifically said to place in tank while frozen. But I think what Cheesecake said makes sense.
Kind of depends what fish you have as well. My bn plecos and peacock gudgeons will cruise for quite some time picking the frozen food off the substrate. The tetras and danios might pick some off the driftwood but thats about it.
 

Catappa

I've always defrosted it first. I use a fine sieve. I know defrosting is controversial on the Internet, but over here in the Netherlands, it's recommended. I found this explanation on one site. Here's the translation:
"Why rinse first... Frozen food always contains nitrates and phosphates, so when it thaws, it ends up in the defrost water. That is why it is important to rinse it with COLD water after defrosting.

Why rinse with COLD water ... If you rinse it with lukewarm or warm water, the protein structure will change and the vitamins will be lost, and of course we don't want that."


Editing to add: I just looked at a package of frozen mosquito larvae from Aquadistri. It says to defrost only the amount needed for feeding and not to refreeze.
 

MacZ

I defrost and rinse cold, too. The water the stuff is frozen in can have high amounts of phosphates and other unwanted stuff, even ammonia I found in frozen food liquid.
Also my stocking density is too low to warrant just dropping in a whole cube. I usually feed less than 1/4 of a cube per serving.

Small tea sieves and artemia sorting sieves are great to defrost without losing small stuff like cyclops.
 

Catappa

I defrost and rinse cold, too. The water the stuff is frozen in can have high amounts of phosphates and other unwanted stuff, even ammonia I found in frozen food liquid.
Also my stocking density is too low to warrant just dropping in a whole cube. I usually feed less than 1/4 of a cube per serving.

Small tea sieves and artemia sorting sieves are great to defrost without losing small stuff like cyclops.

I also use a small tea sieve and also feed only a small piece of a cube each time.
 

Redroofinn

I've always defrosted it first. I use a fine sieve. I know defrosting is controversial on the Internet, but over here in the Netherlands, it's recommended. I found this explanation on one site. Here's the translation:
"Why rinse first... Frozen food always contains nitrates and phosphates, so when it thaws, it ends up in the defrost water. That is why it is important to rinse it with COLD water after defrosting.

Why rinse with COLD water ... If you rinse it with lukewarm or warm water, the protein structure will change and the vitamins will be lost, and of course we don't want that."


Editing to add: I just looked at a package of frozen mosquito larvae from Aquadistri. It says to defrost only the amount needed for feeding and not to refreeze.
Right, I've always defrosted first too and this food is the first I've seen that says to put a whole frozen cube straight into the tank and not to defrost it.
 

MacZ

Right, I've always defrosted first too and this food is the first I've seen that says to put a whole frozen cube straight into the tank and not to defrost it.

Some market their frozen food with added vitamins that could be lost that way. Guess that's their reason. Doesn't change much though. The fish still get enough.
 

Redroofinn

Some market their frozen food with added vitamins that could be lost that way. Guess that's their reason. Doesn't change much though. The fish still get enough.
Agreed. Plus if you're feeding a pellet or flake as a staple I would venture to guess not having vitamin packed frozen food is that big of a deal. I think I'll keep defrosting before feeding. I'd rather not have the mess in the tank. Appreciate the comments!
 

awilkinson871

I have a high stocking in my tank so it goes in frozen. Between the giant danios and the cichlids there isnt a piece to be found within 5 minutes. Even the rainbow shark gets in on the action. For the small tank I cut a chink off and thaw. The rasboras like it to sink a bit so they can eat it in the water column and they do not eat nearly as fast.
 

Cheesecake

I've always defrosted it first. I use a fine sieve. I know defrosting is controversial on the Internet, but over here in the Netherlands, it's recommended. I found this explanation on one site. Here's the translation:
"Why rinse first... Frozen food always contains nitrates and phosphates, so when it thaws, it ends up in the defrost water. That is why it is important to rinse it with COLD water after defrosting.

Why rinse with COLD water ... If you rinse it with lukewarm or warm water, the protein structure will change and the vitamins will be lost, and of course we don't want that."


Editing to add: I just looked at a package of frozen mosquito larvae from Aquadistri. It says to defrost only the amount needed for feeding and not to refreeze.

That makes sense. I've just found that with my tanks not defrosting the bloodworms helps the crab and fish get all the bits and pieces.

So I guess whether or not you defrost/thaw out the food somewhat depends on your stocking and tank setups?

Agreed. Plus if you're feeding a pellet or flake as a staple I would venture to guess not having vitamin packed frozen food is that big of a deal. I think I'll keep defrosting before feeding. I'd rather not have the mess in the tank. Appreciate the comments!

Sounds good OP :)!
 

LadfromLondon

I defrost and rinse cold, too. The water the stuff is frozen in can have high amounts of phosphates and other unwanted stuff, even ammonia I found in frozen food liquid.
Also my stocking density is too low to warrant just dropping in a whole cube. I usually feed less than 1/4 of a cube per serving.

Small tea sieves and artemia sorting sieves are great to defrost without losing small stuff like cyclops.
Do you use untreated, cold tap water? Asking for my own curiosity :)
 

MacZ

Do you use untreated, cold tap water? Asking for my own curiosity :)

Yes, as there's no chlorine or chloramine in my tap. Uncommon in my country in general.
 

Catappa

Yes, as there's no chlorine or chloramine in my tap. Uncommon in my country in general.
Same here in my country.
 

Patman0519

Both my tanks are heavy in bottom dwellers...I fhaw out 2 cubes of mysis shrimp everyday and throw them in
 

86 ssinit

Ok for me I take a Dixie cup fill it with tank water. Drop in the cubes and let them defrost than slowly spill in the food over about an hour. I my reason for thawing :). I just figure fish would never come across frozen foods in the wild (unless they got grocery stores down there that we still haven’t found) so wouldn’t their digestive tracks be bothered by it :).
 

Catappa

Do you sieve it before feeding?
 

86 ssinit

I don’t I just pour it in.
 

Catappa

You might want to reconsider, if you read previous posts. But, to each their own, lol! Whatever works for you is good.
 

86 ssinit

I change water daily so I’m not worried.
 

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