Should I Start Selling Anubias and Buce?

Should I sell transitioning anubias and buce?

  • Yes

    Votes: 4 57.1%
  • No

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Maybe

    Votes: 3 42.9%

  • Total voters
    7
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Vishaquatics

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Hi FishLore,

I've recently gotten a lot of requests for anubias and buce which has got me thinking.

I'm wondering if I should start selling anubias and buce, but here's the catch. I won't be growing entirely submerged from start to beginning like I currently do. It simply grows too slow for it to be profitable. However, I'd be able to order it in wholesale and then transition it over the course of a few weeks. What do you all think of that? Would you be interested in buying anubias and/or buce that have started to become transitioned to submersed growth?

For those that choose to respond to the poll (including those that say maybe), please let me know why you picked the answer you did. Thank you for your time.
 

WetRootsNH

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I think it will be tough to have it work out financially. Your cost of goods is higher since you aren't growing the product so your margin isn't as good. And if you are partially conditioning them for submersed growth than you are taking up room for plants that you could have a better margin on.
The only way I see it working is if you do the rarer ones that you can't just pick up anywhere and therefore fetch a better price. But I also don't know if there is enough people on the forum willing to pay that much for aquarium plants. Buce is extra tough because there are so many varieties that look so similar. Why pay $50 for a buce that looks just like a $5 buce?
Some of the rarer anubias might be better for your margins.
Pangolino
Chili
Pinto
Marble white
Stardust
But if you are doing a common anubias or buce, like 'wavy green', buying it and storing it to only get a dollar or so for it, I could see you losing interest in them.
I'd bet they'll ship nice though!
 
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Vishaquatics

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Definitely some great points you bring up! I was honestly just thinking of doing real common stuff like the wavy green. But you bring up a good point, it's likely not worth the space for only a dollar or so of profit. I bet they ship real nice though! Rhizome plants always ship incredibly well. Now only if swords and stems were the same way
 

WetRootsNH

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Vishaquatics said:
Definitely some great points you bring up! I was honestly just thinking of doing real common stuff like the wavy green. But you bring up a good point, it's likely not worth the space for only a dollar or so of profit. I bet they ship real nice though! Rhizome plants always ship incredibly well. Now only if swords and stems were the same way
Stem plants I can definitely see an issue with as far as shipping, especially fine leaved or fine stemmed varieties. I'm surprised to learn that sword don't ship all that great though. They are so rugged once established! I haven't kept one in years due to how big they get but I used to cut them all the way back to the base of the rosette when they did get to large and they'd bounce right back in no time.
Have you played with tissue cultures at all? I mean some attempt at doing your own?
 
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Vishaquatics

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WetRootsNH said:
Stem plants I can definitely see an issue with as far as shipping, especially fine leaved or fine stemmed varieties. I'm surprised to learn that sword don't ship all that great though. They are so rugged once established! I haven't kept one in years due to how big they get but I used to cut them all the way back to the base of the rosette when they did get to large and they'd bounce right back in no time.
Have you played with tissue cultures at all? I mean some attempt at doing your own?
I grow the plants submerged so the Sword leaves and crypt leaves are ridiculously delicate since they snap so easily in transit. Emersed Swords and crypts tend to be very robust during shipping, but the submerged ones are more delicate because the leaf is so thin. Atleast stems are bendy. Swords and crypts will just snap the leaf.

I was actually thinking about starting up some TCs and I actually almost bought gel and TC supplies. It’s actually quite labor intensive and since I don’t have sterile lab conditions, there’s a high risk of failure. Definitely not worth the hassle in this case.
 

WetRootsNH

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Sterile conditions would definitely be the tough part. Tried growing oyster mushrooms in my apartment before. 1st batch actually came out great but the 2nd got overtaken by mold inspite of me being extremely careful.

Can't do too much to stabilize the shipping I suppose, not like wooden boxes would be economically feasible and the world has quite enough plastic without jamming each box full of packing pillows.
 
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