Seachem Nitrogen...

Discussion in 'Advanced Freshwater Aquarium Topics' started by aquadude91, Apr 15, 2017.

  1. aquadude91

    aquadude91Valued MemberMember

    So a while back I started having problems with getting my nitrates above 5ppm's.... I know sounds silly, but my tank is a 10g HEAVILY planted tank and sometimes I have 0ppm of nitrate. The plants are using them up and showing signs of nitrogen deficiency. I went out and bought Seachem Nitrogen, the directions aren't exactly all that clear on dosing, but I did dose to what it said, about 1/4 capful for a 10g... should I see my nitrates go up on my master test kit? Also, will this help with my algae problem? I have algae and Cyanobacteria. (Blue algae).
     
  2. Lorekeeper

    LorekeeperWell Known MemberMember

    I'm not too sure on the Nitrates, sorry.

    The algae problem can be caused by either:
    1) Too much light, not enough CO2/Ferts
    2)Too many ferts, not enough light/Co2
    3)Too much Light and ferts with not enough co2.

    Cyano is usually caused by the excessive ferts and slow moving water. If you fert the tank, I'd cut back on ferts and cut your lighting period into four 2 hour chunks. Splitting the light kills off most algae.
     
  3. Jocelyn AdelmanFishlore VIPMember

    What type of algae? (Beside cyano)
    Yes, when dosing nitrogen you should start to see it register on your API test. Regular dose = 1mg/L
    Photo of seachem dosing calculator, couldn't get it to calculate if I put 0 for current nitrates
    [​IMG]

    What else do you dose? how often? Co2?
    What plants do you have? What type of lighting?
     
  4. Rivermonster

    RivermonsterValued MemberMember

    Is it possible the plants show nitrogen defiency due to lack of flow ? Have you checked the filter flow? Debris build up?
    Back up on your light schedule to like 5-6 hours and see if that helps algae. How old are the light bulbs
     
  5. OP
    OP
    aquadude91

    aquadude91Valued MemberMember

    I am getting a reading now of 10-20ppm Nitrate.... I don't dose anything else. Plants are crypts, java Fern, water Sprite, Amazon Sword, Cabomba. The swords and Sprite are showing Nitrogen deficiency.... I have a very small outbreak of Cyanobacteria... and I have a brown algae covering some of my plants. I did put a power head to up the water flow...

    No C02.... it's a satellite LED with 6500K of power.
     
  6. Jocelyn AdelmanFishlore VIPMember

    With a decent light you need to be dosing ferts.
    The sword and crypts needs root tabs, it won't absorb nutrients from the water column. The cambomba and Sprite will absorb from the water column, but being that it is a fast growing plant it will need both macros and micros. Java fern will do better with ferts as well, just not as necessary.
    Your plants could show signs of nitrogen now, but will show other deficiencies once the nitrogen is sorted out.
    You can do root tabs and an all in one fert (nilocg makes one called thrive, seachem comp is also fine, thrive is better, both are on Amazon) to make things easier.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    aquadude91

    aquadude91Valued MemberMember

    What do u mean macro/micro? I forgot to add I AM using Seachem flourish tabs... also using Seachem flourite dark Substrate... the crypto is growing just fine... just have a brown algae problem.. I am not sure if it is diatoms or something else....
     
  8. Jocelyn AdelmanFishlore VIPMember

    Macro ferts are NPK, nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium. Micro ferts are trace elements (a number of things). You can dose in in mainly two ways, the first is with an all in one fert that contains all of these, or dose macro and micro separately. For more complex (higher tech, etc) tanks macros/micro becomes the way of choice.
    Even with fluorite you need to dose column ferts.
    I can't comment on the cyano as I have never had it, but for the brown algae, does it wipe off? If so it's diatoms, usually caused by excess silicates in the system. Unfortunately it's one of those things that are common to new tanks and has to just run its course. Dipping the plants in hydrogen peroxide can help some, also wiping off leaves right before a water change.
     




  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice