Sea monkeys help needed!!!

MaddieLynn

My little sister got a sea monkey kit for her birthday. It came with the eggs, "water purifier", food, and a teeny tiny twelve-ounce tank (if you can call it a tank). Now common sense tells me that if these creatures grow to be 3/4" long and there are going to be several of them, they should have a bigger tank eventually, so I think we'll move them after they grow a little bit in the small tank, but I have a few questions:

Do they need a filter? I'm wondering if this is something like bettas, where everyone says, "Nope, they don't need a filter or anything. Just toss them in a bowl!"

Can you feed them anything else other than the special sea monkey food, which happens to cost a whopping $3 for about a tablespoon of food? The official website says anything else will kill them, but I think that's probably a lie to get more business.

Also, the website says that if you see "gunk" in the bottom of the tank, then you should NOT vacuum it out because it is part of the natural sea-monkey ecosystem!!! I'm thinking that this could be true, if you define "natural" as rotting piles of shed sea-monkey skin that is causing a massive ammount of ammonia... but I could be wrong.

Can anyone enlighten me?
 

Tigerfishy

Hmmmm, I'm not sure meenu, but bettas DO need filters and a heated tank too .

I would guess they are as vulnerable to ammonia as other underwater species, but as for a filter, I don't think one would be small enough for the 'tank' that comes with them lol!

I wonder if I could google for more info...back soon!!
 

MaddieLynn

They're supposedly some hybrid kind that lives longer and grows bigger, and I've seen that you're not supposed to put salt in their water... but again, I don't know anything! lol
 

Meenu

I'm trying to search for information on them - there is a LOT of conflicting advice out there.
 

Martinismommy

I thought they were brine shrimp too.....Did it come with any directions?
 

Tigerfishy

Just noticing that myself... Some say they need the salinity, some say they don't. Some say you can feed them bakers yeast dissolved in water, some say this will kill them. Somebody even said that the little packet you get with them should last a year . That however seems a little unrealistic lol!!

EDIT: They are brine shrimp!
 

ANGEL_Z

no they do not need filters they will straight out suck them in and kill them. they do not need heaters either.some people say they are brine shrimp but the site says they are a special kind. you can even use them as live food for other fish.no they do not need a bigger tank unless you really wanted to. I wouldnt feed them anything else besides the sea monkey food because I don't think there is anything else that they could possibly eat.but I could be wrong.yes there food is a bit expensive but it lastes a lot because u should only feed them once every 2 weeks. you might think they get hungry but they dont. 1 day not eating for us is crazy but they have tiny stomachs and only need very little food.
 

Meenu

You only feed them once every two weeks?? :shock:
 

MaddieLynn

I think the package says every 2 days. But I obviously don't trust it, so that's why I'm asking here.
 

LyndaB

OMG! You can still get sea monkey kits? I had one like a bazillion years ago!!! :shock:
 

platy ben

I think they are brine shrimp too!
 

Elodea

When your sister's not looking, sneak a few to feed your fish. High in carotenes, they are.
 

andimthejr

They are brine shrimp right? They are not really monkeys from the sea right ? If I'm getting some!
 

ayelie

This is the strangest topic. I saw them on the back of comic books and always wanted some.... oh well maybe next Christmas
 

Jackie Frost

I used to have sea-monkeys! I loved em as a kid. I had all the fancy tanks for them (the ones that are shaped like a rocket and comes with it's own tank light) and everything! In a way I guess it was a precesor for owning a great big grown up tank as an adult.

I do believe they are a kind of brine shrimp. Wikipedia has an excellent entry on them. As for filters I know the Sea Monkey would sell vacuums and a sort of air-stoney thing. (You have to work the air stone manually). I hope that helps somewhat.
 

jeniferdwn

the instruction sheet that I had way back when, said if the water got cloudy, stop feeding for a day or so and the water would clear up. They did have the little plastic thing you mashed at the top to suck up the dirty water or mashed easily to stir up the water.
 

Carolann

I'm new here, but yeah, I know they are brine shrimp.
So as a child, (probably around 8 if I recall correctly) my parents let me get one of those blue sea monkey kits, and I was fascinated by the little creatures. Of course I never knew, or bothered to check out what sea monkeys really were. Needless to say, when I found out they were shrimp, I was surprised. They have been my only endeavor in "aquariums" (if you wanna call 'em that) since or ever, though I have researched A LOT on bettas and aquariums and cycling and all that great stuff. (Learned my lesson long ago about jumping into pet parentship without knowledge--bunny babies x2)
So I am kind of wanting to make a go of "Sea Monkeys" again(as pets NOT fish food). But I doubt they would last as long as they probably could in my house in the winter. See I live in Minnesota and despite heating the place, the warmest it stays is mid to lower 50's (on a nice day). We are fine with that, but I have a suspicion shrimp won't be. Therefore I need to know several things:
1. Can I put them in a 1 gallon tank without a filter, but heat it.
2. How low of temps can they really survive at anyhow? (Out of all my research, I can only find hatching temps.)
3. Would I do water changes? Since they feed on they algae? I get mixed info on that as well.
4. Could I possibly be over run with them if they find the conditions favorable for breeding? Or do they breed to their surroundings(do they notice over population and breed accordingly) ?
5. Since planting the tank isn't really an option, what could I do to make it look nice?

I've also heard of the freshwater version of brine shrimp. How hard is it to keep Fairy shrimp? All of the above questions except 5 would apply to this as well if you have any knowledge on the subject.

And if all that fails and/or won't work out, what about any other non or slow breeding shrimp that are easy to keep? And what's the minimum numbers/smallest tank.

Thank you for putting up with my long post and huge list of questions!
 

Kenny777

Not sure about brine shrimp and all of the other questions but you could do Amano Shrimp they don't breed in freshwater.
 

Carolann

Really? That is interesting, and they look cool as well! What type of setup would you recommend?
 

MattS99

Really? That is interesting, and they look cool as well! What type of setup would you recommend?
Amanos will be fine as long as they have some algae to feed on, but they're scavengers as well. Have you seen red cherry shrimp or any of their color varieties?
 

Carolann

@ MattS99
Yes I have. The blue velvet ones are absolutely gorgeous but I fear that they may need a larger tank than I have space for. How many would need to be kept at minimum? Do they over populate tanks easily?
 

MattS99

@ MattS99
Yes I have. The blue velvet ones are absolutely gorgeous but I fear that they may need a larger tank than I have space for. How many would need to be kept at minimum? Do they over populate tanks easily?
You could do a colony of about 10 RCS and 2 amanos in a 1.5 gallon. Just buy 5 of whatever RCS variety you'll like and let them breed, they breed very easily.
 

Keystone

If you maintain conditions properly brine shrimp will continue to breed - I know of one person that kept a brine shrimp culture going for nine years. If your culture crashes you can let the tank dry out and add (salt) water again - brine shrimp eggs survive being dried out - or you can just buy more eggs and start again.

Depending on the species of fairy shrimp you'll get anywhere from one to three generations before they stop. When fairy shrimp stop reproducing you will have to let substrate dry out or the eggs won't hatch.

If you upped your tank size to a 5 gallon you could use a heater to maintain temps during the cold season
 

Carolann

Wow! 9 years is longer than what I had heard! In your opinion though, between the fairy shrimp or brine shrimp, which are easier to maintain? Though now MattS99 has me interested in trying RCS! Though I'm still not sure lol.
 

Keystone

Personally, I think the easiest shrimp to maintain are Halocaridina rubra - also known as the Hawaiian Red Shrimp or Opae Ula.

Ostracods - aka seed shrimp are also very easy to maintain.

If I had to choose between brine shrimp and fairy shrimp as full time pets I would probably go with brine shrimp so I wouldn't have to keep letting the tank dry out.
 

Carolann

Are the claims of what Hawaiian Red Shrimp can tolerate true? Or just a selling point for lazy people? I mean 50 to a half gallon with no filter, heater or water changes seems unbelievable...
 

Keystone

Here's a link to a US based Opae ula web site with its own forum


 

Carolann

Thanks Keystone
 

Lance0414

If you do Cherry Shrimp/Velvet Shrimp/Neon Yellow Shrimp/Neocaridina Davidi/etc. you will need a 5 Gallon minimum as they breed so much. I would not mix same species/different color(unless all the shrimp are male) as they will breed together and make ugly brown or mush colored babies. If you get a 10 Gallon you could do-
20 Neocaridina Davidi(Any Species)
10 Caridinia Cantonesis(Any Species)
10 Amano Shrimp
or if a 5 Gallon-
20 Neocaridina Davidi(Any Species)
5 Amano Shrimp
 

penguin02

Just make sure the temperature stays in the 70s. 50 degrees is definitely not a good temperature for RCS.
 

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