Sea anemone

ali712
Member
So I have a hypothetical question and I was hoping someone would be able to answer it for me (or tell me I'm crazy and should not do this). So I absolutely love sea anemones and have been dying to get one but I do not currently have a saltwater tank. This leads to my question; is it possible to keep just a single sea anemone in its own small tank or would I have to wait until I have a whole saltwater setup? I know I have a lot of research to do before I make any decisions, I jsut wanted to ask if it was even possible
Thanks in Advance!
 
RandomFishBoi
Member
Wow, you must really like sea anemones to dedicate an entire tank to just one. I am by no means experienced in saltwater, but based on what I do know and the research I have done, I'd say it should be fine as long as you take a certain extra steps to keep the anemone healthy.
 
kanzekatores
Member
You don't need to have any other corals/fish if that's what you want, but most common anemones grow to be quite large. You also need powerful lighting. Depending on the species of anemone, I'd say a 20-30 gallon might be suitable for an anemone. Unless there is a smaller kind maybe you could do a 10g.
 
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ryanr
Moderator
Member
Hi, welcome to Fishlore.
Anemones are very sensitive animals. In addition to lighting, you need to consider flow in the tank, as anemones are primarily filter feeders (they can be target fed meaty items), they also use flow to help carry away waste when they purge.

Nutrient levels are another consideration, most anemones have very little tolerance for any level of phosphates and/or nitrates.

Controlling SG/salinity, temperature, calcium, alkalinity and magnesium are also considerations when keeping anemones.

And size, I'd say a minimum 20G for the smaller species, but something like a bubble tip (BTA), a minimum 3 ft tank, as a BTA can easily get to the size of a dinner plate, and it will travel the tank to find a spot it likes.
 
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ali712
Member
Do you have a recommendation for what to keep in a 20g? I know that sea anemones are very sensitive but are there any kinds that would be easiest to keep in a 20g?
Thanks for all the advice, everyone! I think this sounds feasible so long as I have the right tank and lights and everything.
 
AggressiveAquatics
Member
ali712 said:
Do you have a recommendation for what to keep in a 20g? I know that sea anemones are very sensitive but are there any kinds that would be easiest to keep in a 20g?
Thanks for all the advice, everyone! I think this sounds feasible so long as I have the right tank and lights and everything.
Not sure if there are any anemones for a 20 gallon but maybe a mushroom coral would be fine but keep in mind they do take quite a while to grow
 
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ryanr
Moderator
Member
ali712 said:
I know that sea anemones are very sensitive but are there any kinds that would be easiest to keep in a 20g?
Ummm, aiptasia (aka Glass Rose Anemone) seems easy to keep in any setup

On a serious note, the Condy is a popular smaller anemone that is a little more resilient, though ideally should be in 30G, but it can sting other inhabitants.
https://www.fishlore.com/profile-condyanemone.htm
 
Jesterrace
Member
ryanr said:
Ummm, aiptasia (aka Glass Rose Anemone) seems easy to keep in any setup

On a serious note, the Condy is a popular smaller anemone that is a little more resilient, though ideally should be in 30G, but it can sting other inhabitants.
Condy Anemone Care - Size, Life Span, Tank Mates, Breeding
Condys can also eat smaller fish.
ali712 said:
Do you have a recommendation for what to keep in a 20g? I know that sea anemones are very sensitive but are there any kinds that would be easiest to keep in a 20g?
Thanks for all the advice, everyone! I think this sounds feasible so long as I have the right tank and lights and everything.
A Bubble Tip 'Nem aka BTA is usually the starting point for most. Be aware though that they will go where they want (true of any 'nem) and can be prone to going into powerheads/wavemakers. So make sure your powerheads have a solid head/cover on them. Personally though I would skip the 'nem and just go with a Long/Large Polyp Stony Coral that offers a similar look. They are easier to care for and grow out in place. Here is an example of a Frogspawn Coral that I have:

 

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