Question Schooling Fish For African Cichlids?

CaptainAquatics

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Hi! I was just wondering what some schooling fish would work for my african cichlids? Would black skirt tetras work? They are somewhat larger in size. What about fathead minnows (feeder fish)? Would a large group of them work? The stocking is:
- 3 firemouth cichlids
- 1 jewel cichlid (who is surprisingly peaceful)
- 1 electric blue cichlid
- 1 electric yellow cichlid (somewhat small)
- 1 Snow White cichlid (somewhat small)
- 1 albino Oscar (only in there temporarily, that tank is kinda acting as a grow out tank for him, lol)

I know it is more South American than african American but what do you think? Thanks
 

david1978

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I probably would do the minnows. Since they are feeder fish after all so if they do get eaten they aren't $3-4 fish.
 
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CaptainAquatics

CaptainAquatics

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david1978 said:
I probably would do the minnows. Since they are feeder fish after all so if they do get eaten they aren't $3-4 fish.
What do you think that chances are that they do get eaten, because I don’t really want them to get eaten.
 

david1978

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I guess its one of those as the fish get bigger the chances go up thing.
 

Lajos

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Usually you don't keep African cichlids with a group of schooling fish as they are too aggressive for most schooling fish.

But if you are keeping South American cichlids, then it's fine to have a group of schooling fish because some South American cichlids are "timid and need the company of a schooling fish".


Black Skirt Tetras(from South America) are not suitable as they prefer soft water whereas African cichlids prefer hard water.

Firemouth is from Central America and may not be suitable to mix with African cichlids that are more aggressive.

Usually you should not mix fish from different continents due to different water requirement.

Why not you keep a group of Mbuna cichlids instead of a group of schooling fish?
Get a few more of the Electric Yellow Cichlids, Electric Blue Cichlids and other colourful Mbuna cichlids.

But do take note of the requirements of the African Cichlids as they are more aggressive and need to be kept in a big group.


Here are some info about Electric Yellow Cichlids, Electric Blue Cichlids and fish that are compatible with them.












Name of Mbuna fish:
 
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CaptainAquatics

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Lajos said:
Usually you don't keep African cichlids with a group of schooling fish as they are too aggressive for most schooling fish.

But if you are keeping South American cichlids, then it's fine to have a group of schooling fish because some South American cichlids are "timid and need the company of a schooling fish".


Black Skirt Tetras(from South America) are not suitable as they prefer soft water whereas African cichlids prefer hard water.

Firemouth is from Central America and may not be suitable to mix with African cichlids that are more aggressive.

Usually you should not mix fish from different continents due to different water requirement.

Why not you keep a group of Mbuna cichlids instead of a group of schooling fish?
Get a few more of the Electric Yellow Cichlids, Electric Blue Cichlids and probably some Peacocks cichlids which are very colourful.

But do take note of the requirements of the African Cichlids as they are more aggressive and need to be kept in a big group.


Here are some info about Electric Yellow Cichlids, Electric Blue Cichlids and fish that are compatible with them.












Name of Mbuna fish:
Thank you
 

Lajos

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Some interesting videos on Mbuna cichlids but take note to avoid some species of Mbuna fish that are more aggressive.
Most Mbuna fish that have stripes on their bodies are extremely aggressive(I can't remember their names).
So, check the profiles of the fish before buying.






Or you can keep only Peacock Cichlids tank that are less aggressive than Mbuna.



 

nikm128

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If mbunas weren't such jerks it would be fine, just because I'm feel extra picky right now....
Lajos said:
Black Skirt Tetras(from South America) are not suitable as they prefer soft water whereas African cichlids prefer hard water.
It's actually 100% fine to put fish from soft acidic water in harder alkaline water because they will still have all the minerals and nutrients they were designed to work with, it just doesn't work the opposite way since the hard water fish will be lacking minerals
Lajos said:
Firemouth is from Central America and may not be suitable to mix with African cichlids that are more aggressive.

Usually you should not mix fish from different continents due to different water requirement.
Absolutely on the aggression, but a little fun fact for you, Central American and South African cichlids both live in very similar waters, the SA will still have slightly harder more alkaline water, but not by much

The ones you want to watch out for are: Auratus (black and yellow stripes), KenyI (black and blue stripes(vertically) for the F, yellow and black for M), and electric blue JohanI (horizontal black and blue)
Mixing Peacocks and Mbunas will be very difficult and definitely will require a large tank due to the slightly different habitats and the aggression
 

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