Sarasa comets

yamon100
  • #1
HI everyone. My Sarasa comet died a few days ago and I was thinking of getting two more for my tank. I have heard some comets are very aggressive towards other fish. My comet though was very tame, peaceful and friendly to all the fish in my tank. Advice PLEASE!:;pirate
 
Butterfly
  • #2
Welcome to FishLore Yamon 100
How many and what fish did you have with your Comet?
Sorry to hear ir died.
Carol
 
yamon100
  • Thread Starter
  • #3
Butterfly
  • #4
Yamon I merged your posts about the comet. hope you don't mind. when the same post os posted in several different places responses tend to be confusing. This way all your information is in one place.
thanks.Carol
 
yamon100
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
Thanks. Appreciate it.
 
yamon100
  • Thread Starter
  • #6
do you have any advice then?
 
Butterfly
  • #7
Your tank must be very pretty with the angels and neons. I have had that combination before and really liked it.
Perhaps you can get another tank for comets since they are cool water fish and the angels and neons are tropical. Goldfish don't live long in the warm water angels and neons need. We recommend 20 g for the first goldfish and 10 gallon for each additional goldfish added. They are such heavy waste producers they really need this space.
Carol
 
gremlin
  • #8
I agree that you should get a separate tank for the comets. they may pick at the angel's fins, altho I have never had a problem with any of mine. Mostly, they do need to have the cooler water temps. They can stand the warmer water, but they are more active with cooler room temp water.
 
sirdarksol
  • #9
Agreed that goldfish prefer temperate (read: non-climate-controlled) water. Mine is much happier and much more active now that it's in a tank sans heater.
 
yamon100
  • Thread Starter
  • #10
u know I got the comets and evrything is fine. Thanks though everyone
 
sirdarksol
  • #11
Because goldfish are pretty hardy, things will be fine for awhile. They will be stressed, however, if they remain in water that stays a steady 76-80 degrees. This usually manifests first as a blanching of color. My comet is now jelly-bean pink because he was kept in a tropical tank. A year in a temperate tank has not fixed the damage. Anything that causes a permanent change in pigmentation like that isn't likely to be healthy for the fish.
 
BornAgain
  • #12
Hello, all. Early this spring, a fish appeared in my ornamental (outdoor) pond. He/she, I believed, is a sarasa comet and is about 3 to 4 inches long. About a month later, a second fish appeared in the pond which was a tiny little blue and black fish but he died when I was cleaning the pond. Anyways, I have never had fish before and now that winter is very near, I am trying to figure out what to do with this little fish who I named Miracle. I am deciding between letting her loose in a nearby pond but wondering if she will just get eaten? I would like your feedback on that. I do not want to keep her in the current pond as it becomes a mess in the winter no matter what I do and is currently getting overload with leaves despite my scooping it daily or every other day. So, my other option is to get an aquarium and bring her inside until spring, then relocate her back into the pond. If I do this, I will get another fish, preferrably quite small and only one. I am trying to do my research because I truly have no idea what I need to know about fish care. I should note that I am VERY much on a budget right now. As a temporary "seasonal" home, what would be the minimum aquarium size I could get away with if I bring her inside? Also, what else would I need as far as supplies go? I would also LOVE it if someone could outline a routine of taking care of fish so I have an idea of what this involves. I have pets and I am a very good pet mommy so I want to do this right but being on a budget I am kind of in a tough place! I quite like this little fish, however. I would love some feedback here.
 
GuineaPigster
  • #13
Welcome! Just saying, you will get more replies if your post is in paragraphs.
These guys need massive tanks, so inside is not really an option if you're on a budget. However, you MIGHT be able to do a 75 gallon for the winter.
How big is your pond?
 
Scoutsfish
  • #14
AThe main most important thing to know is what the nitrogen cycle is.

Comets need a large tank because of their large waste amount and large size(can get 12 in +). Fish(even bettas) need filtered and cycled tanks. Since you are on a budget, is there any way you could pick up a stock pond at a local lowes/home depot/hardware store? This will help. You could keep this in your basement or somewhere inside that is kept warm enough water won't freeze. Stock ponds are usually to shallow to prevent it all from freezing. You will need a large filter, and if kept outside or somewhere to cold, you'll need a heater.

What size is the pond? Also, getting a simple live aquatic plant such as hornwort will help help reduce the ammonia, nitrite and nitrate.

Do not release the fish into another pond. It is (I'm pretty sure) illegal.

You'll also have need to do water changes to reduce nitrate have fun and good luck!!
 
Mommabear
  • #15
Ok, I'll chime in. I had comets in and outdoor container last winter and started to panic as things froze. I found a 29 gal aquarium in the paper and brought them inside. Now, that being said... I had to make sure I did regular water changes every week, made sure it was clean and tried not to overfeed. It's not difficult, but it is work. Then when spring came I cycled up my outside 'tank' and let them loose. Over the winter they were able to grow a bit, fattened up. They came out at about 4 inches long, 4 of them.

They are now in a stock tank on the patio this winter, my 150 g. But you can get smaller ones at Atwoods, TSC, Lowes etc
 
jdhef
  • #16
Welcome to FishLore!

Since you are on a budget, which would prevent you from being able to have a suitable indoor home for the fish, I would recommend trying to find a fish store that will take him off your hands.
 
GuineaPigster
  • #17
Welcome to FishLore!

Since you are on a budget, which would prevent you from being able to have a suitable indoor home for the fish, I would recommend trying to find a fish store that will take him off your hands.

That would work well, though I'd recommend a pond store so the pet store doesn't sell this big guy to someone with a 10 gallon!

It'd be great if the OP culd get back to us. I'm interested in why the pond gets so messy.
 
LyndaB
  • #18
How do fish just appear in your pond?
 
psalm18.2
  • #19
A rubbermaid tub will work for the winter w/ a filter and water changes.

What size in the fish now?
 
BornAgain
  • #20
The fish hasn't grown for a long time and from what I have been told...won't grow pass about the 4 inches that she currently is. My husband knew the exact size of our pond but I only know it is the equivalent of about 3 bathtubs...two on the bottom and one on top. I will not give her to a pet store as I know how pet stores work.

Someone else mentioned the idea of a Rubbermaid-type container...is that something that really is feasible? Is there a way to do a lid with that? From what I have been reading online, a minimum of a 29 gallon tank would work for this fish. I was looking at about a 45 gallon tank. Of course, I am here asking questions to gain more insight.

For the record, I keep the pond in great shape with water plants and all the rest of the year. And as far as how fish just show up in my pond, well, that's an excellent question that I cannot give an exact answer too. It started as a "frog pond" but the two fish appeared and ate those ate. I imagine two eggs were stuck to the water plants. Believe, I was shocked to find one, then two, fish.

@Mommabear....I have been leaning towards doing what you did but with a slightly larger indoor tank. I could get a larger indoor tank for next year like you did as well so I am really only looking at getting by with something for this winter..until about the beginning of March.
 
psalm18.2
  • #21
I used egg light crate for a lid weighted with a rock, works. A 50 gallon barrel will work for this winter w/ a 4"fish.
 
GuineaPigster
  • #22
I used egg light crate for a lid weighted with a rock, works. A 50 gallon barrel will work for this winter w/ a 4"fish.

She will definitely grow bigger. Probably not over winter, but she probably will.
 
psalm18.2
  • #23
I'd suggest measuring the depth of the pond. It may be OK with a pond heater if it's at least 4' deep. May be the cheapest option for the long term.
 
Mommabear
  • #24
yep, gotta make do for now. I understand that one. If you get a stock tank, learn from our experience. Gotta turn the outside collar just a bit to tighten it up....I freaked when mine was leaking til then. Good luck, you can do this
 
BornAgain
  • #25
My pond is about 3 feet deep.

I am still exploring my options here and looking on ebay for tanks. I am going to check ebay also for a heater for the pond.

Meanwhile...what brand should I...or should I not...feed her as far as pellets/flakes go? Also, how much do I actually feed for one single fish and how often?
 
BornAgain
  • #26
What?! No replies?
Ok..more questions and lets see if I get some feedback!
I am looking at an aquarium but I need to know about supplies. First off, do I need a filter and what kind of filter do I get? Does it matter? I am trying to see how much it willl cost me as well...the two aquariums I am looking at are a 32 gallon and a 39 gallon.
Also, do I need gravel for the bottom? And what about something for oxygen? Bubbles?
Basically...what do I need?
 
Fashooga
  • #27
Don't Comet fish usually live in cold tempratures? Why not just leave the fish there? My friend has a pond full of these fish and during the winter she just leaves them alone, and when spring comes back they are ok.

You can always call a pond shop and ask them about what to do when leaves fall. Maybe put a tarp over if or something. But either way that fish will survive there than in a tank. You'll stress it out and yourself.
 
psalm18.2
  • #28
Here's a great guide for winterizing a pond and taking care of comets.
 
BornAgain
  • #29
She cannot be kept in the pond...hence the initial posting to begin with. I was hoping for some care information. I will keep searching the web instead.
 
Scoutsfish
  • #30
What?! No replies?
Ok..more questions and lets see if I get some feedback!
I am looking at an aquarium but I need to know about supplies. First off, do I need a filter and what kind of filter do I get? Does it matter? I am trying to see how much it willl cost me as well...the two aquariums I am looking at are a 32 gallon and a 39 gallon.
Also, do I need gravel for the bottom? And what about something for oxygen? Bubbles?
Basically...what do I need?

For a filter I suggest an aquaclear 50 for those sized tanks. It is great quality and you can adjust the water flow.

You don't need gravel, but if you do make sure it is bigger since some goldfish like to move it in their mouth.

You don't need bubbles as the filter will provide enough oxygen, they are just another addition some people use; especially if theI fish gulp at the surface for more air. If this was the case with you I would just suggest increasing the filter outflow.

For fish food, anything is better than nothing at this moment. I would pickup a small container of flakes and pellets, experiment with them a little. For the flakes though, feed a small pinch but release it under the water. This way the goldy won't gulp air. Sorry, not best with food brands.

The most important thing you can know to take care of this fish is the nitrogen cycle. Please read up on this. It will help your fish.
 
lorianne621
  • #31
If you have a Petco near you they have a dollar a gallon sale every couple of months. Should be having one again real soon. I got my 40 gallon that way. It makes getting a bigger tank a little easier. Also check craigslist. I got a fully set up 55 gallon for $100. It came with lid, wood stand, filters, lights, everything! This would be great option for you. Especially if you have a week or two to look and depending on where you are you probably do. Tanks turn up on Craigslist all the time.

Good luck!
 
psalm18.2
  • #32
She cannot be kept in the pond...hence the initial posting to begin with. I was hoping for some care information. I will keep searching the web instead.

That link also has guides for aquarium inside care.
 
BornAgain
  • #33
Thanks, all! I am checking out Petco..there isn't one near me but that would be a great deal. I have been checking the ads, craiglist, and ebay. The cheapest thing I have found so far though is $88.00 for a 39 gallon tank. I have been hoping to find some sort of black Friday deal but I don't think tanks are high on the black Friday sale list!
Based on your tank size, how often do you refill it and how do you recommend emptying an indoor tank? Also...do I still any chemicals for a tank? I had my routine down for the pond but am trying to see how this differs.
 
BornAgain
  • #34
One more thing---if I am taking this fish indoors, I wanted to get her/hI'm a pal. Obviously, I want a small fish and I don't want any breeding. The other fish that had been in my pond was only about 1 inch big...and a blue/blackish color. Any recommendations?
 
BornAgain
  • #35
I feel so needy! I saw this ad listed in my city....looks like a good deal with all it includes..price is not listed but they are asking for offers. Just looking for feedback, I suppose.

38 Gallon Tank & Wood Stand
38 Gallon Glass Lid
Coralife Aqualight 36" T5 Dual Lamp Fixture
Hampton Bay 13-7/8 in. Satin Chrome Clamp Lamp
Marineland Maxi-Jet Pro Aquarium Pump 1200 (295/1300 Gph)
25+ lbs of Live Rock
CaribSea 20-Pound Special Grade Reef Sand
Fluval AquaClear Power Filter 70 Gallon
MinI Compact Fluorescent 50/50 Colormax Lamp
Instant Ocean Aquarium Hydrometer
 
crazycatlady
  • #36
That's a saltwater tank. Most of the things included are not really useful/cannot be used for freshwater. I would personally pass.
 
BornAgain
  • #37
How do I know the difference between a saltwater and freshwater tank? Also, I found another listing today...says it was used as a sump/aquarium. What is a sump? Also says it still has baffles siliconed but they can be removed. Again, no idea what they are talking about. Input would be wonderful...this one is CHEAP so I am interested.
 
Scoutsfish
  • #38
When they have sumps or pumps aside from air pumps, coral, live rock, hyrdometers, ocean lights, etc they are salt water. The things used/needed for freshwater are a filter, a heater, basically any light if you're not doing live plants, gravel etc. Try craigslist. I found a 90 gal for $40 in my area with a canister filter and 'everything needed for happy fish' unsure what that includes but either way I can't get it unless parents say yes... good luck!!!
 
jdhef
  • #39
A sump is usually a separate tank that is plumbed to the main tank, but has no fish in it. I'm not real up on sumps, but I think people use a sump to increase their volume of water without having a larger tank. I'm thinking this might be helpful with African Cichlids which need to be overstocked due to aggression issues. With a sump you would lessen the bioload while still having the tank overstocked.

I'm sure there are other reasons for having a sump and someone hopefully will add to the discussion.
 
lorianne621
  • #40
About sumps - Almost all saltwater tanks have a sump. it is part of the filtration system I believe. I don't have a saltwater tank so we need someone else to add to the conversation here to confirm. It does add to the volume of water but because it is a hidden part of the tank, usually another smaller tank hidden in the cabinet under the main tank, I believe it is used to house the many things that would be considered unsightly in the main tank, some algae that is beneficial to the bio-system but that you don't want in your main tank, lots of filter materials, etc... As I understand it the additional volume of water is a benefit in saltwater due to the difficulty in maintaining the water parameters.

For freshwater tanks you don't need or want them they are too much work and trouble, look for a simple self contained tank without a sump or baffles. If you can find one with a lid, a light, a filter, either a hang on back or canister type, (not under gravel) a thermometer and a heater all thrown in for a reasonable price then I would say you are doing great as those are the basics and other than some chemicals to treat and test the water you would have what you need.
 

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