Saltwater ecosphere help

LittleBlueGuppy

Well Known Member
Messages
924
Reaction score
527
Points
128
Experience
1 year
Hi, lately I have been seeing a lot about sealed saltwater ecospheres in small jars and bottles and such. I was very interested in one. I was planning on asking to go to the beach my next birthday so I though it would be a great time to try.

Has anyone done one of these before? I would really want to start it with natural sea water.

Any information anybody has on these would be wonderful. thx!

@stella1979
 

BlackSkirtTetra

Valued Member
Messages
280
Reaction score
144
Points
63
Experience
2 years
You might not want to start with sea water from the beach. Because there are humans there. Although it might contain many beneficial and natural bacteria, it could also be polluted by waste.

If you do try to add it I would run many tests making sure it is clean.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #3

LittleBlueGuppy

Well Known Member
Messages
924
Reaction score
527
Points
128
Experience
1 year
You might not want to start with sea water from the beach. Because there are humans there. Although it might contain many beneficial and natural bacteria, it could also be polluted by waste.

If you do try to add it I would run many tests making sure it is clean.
We usually go to brookings to go to the beach and the water is very clean where we go, I hardly every see any trash at all and the beach’s have a lot of life and I think they are really careful about pollutants (I think most everybody there are environmentalists). It seems a lot more interesting to start one with sea water and wild algae’s and organisms, and all the life would be pretty adapted to this area so the temperature and such would be right. But I’d be careful.
 

stella1979

Moderator
Messages
7,494
Reaction score
9,623
Points
608
Experience
5 to 10 years
I quite like this idea in that, it seems like a lot of fun and like there would be lots of good lessons along the way. :)

I have never done an ecosphere myself and have watched too few to comment on what may be common problems to watch out for or anything. What immediately comes to mind is flow... how do we provide it in a closed system? How do we oxygenate the water? While ecospheres exist, I don't understand exactly how to set one up so the enclosed, stagnant conditions don't quickly lead to a stanky tank. Then again, I've seen moderate success in large jars before so... I'm sorry I don't know more about this particular area my friend. However, as said, imo, the idea is super cool and I'd love to see it!

Lastly, long ago:p there was a thread here about a reef jar by a member called Lorekeeper. This was before a few cleanups around here and a rather BIG update so... idk if that old info can be found but if I run across it, I'll send it your way.
 

FinalFins

Well Known Member
Messages
1,414
Reaction score
693
Points
123
I agree with BlackSkirtTetra. wild sea water although doesn't contain much bacteria, it contains plankton and when in captivity, many times these either die off, or the population explodes, both of those cause problems.

Furthermore, the salinity/specific gravity in the jar would fluctuate too much be suitible for life.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #6

LittleBlueGuppy

Well Known Member
Messages
924
Reaction score
527
Points
128
Experience
1 year
I agree with BlackSkirtTetra. wild sea water although doesn't contain much bacteria, it contains plankton and when in captivity, many times these either die off, or the population explodes, both of those cause problems.

Furthermore, the salinity/specific gravity in the jar would fluctuate too much be suitible for life.
The salinity would not fluctuate at all because the goal is to have it sealed (air tight) in a jar so there is no evaporation. I do not see how the salinity would change.
The goal is to add seawater and live rock and stuff and also enough algae and plant life so there will be adequate oxygen levels in the jar to sustain the micro organisms and small crustaceans from the ocean. Many people just make an ecosphere with brine shrimp and algae, but many make it with natural sea water so it’s a little more interesting. I am gearing toward the natural sea water because it’s kind of an experiment, and I don’t really want to spend money on buying live rock and algae cultures to sustain it when we live within a few hours from a very clean part of the ocean. One think I am curious, you say not to use ocean water because of pollutants, but the life is from the same part of the ocean so even if there are pollutants, the life is obviously already thriving in that environment so it wouldn’t really change anything.

I was just curious if anyone had tried one of these before.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #7

LittleBlueGuppy

Well Known Member
Messages
924
Reaction score
527
Points
128
Experience
1 year
I quite like this idea in that, it seems like a lot of fun and like there would be lots of good lessons along the way. :)

I have never done an ecosphere myself and have watched too few to comment on what may be common problems to watch out for or anything. What immediately comes to mind is flow... how do we provide it in a closed system? How do we oxygenate the water? While ecospheres exist, I don't understand exactly how to set one up so the enclosed, stagnant conditions don't quickly lead to a stanky tank. Then again, I've seen moderate success in large jars before so... I'm sorry I don't know more about this particular area my friend. However, as said, imo, the idea is super cool and I'd love to see it!

Lastly, long ago:p there was a thread here about a reef jar by a member called Lorekeeper. This was before a few cleanups around here and a rather BIG update so... idk if that old info can be found but if I run across it, I'll send it your way.
Thanks, I’d love to see that if you come by it. (And I’ll definitely be posting photos if I start one).
 

FinalFins

Well Known Member
Messages
1,414
Reaction score
693
Points
123
kH is the buffering capacity of pH. It slowly drops in a closed system because it well, dont know how to explain but water has a property(kH) that allows the pH to be stable while acid or bases or added (aka organism waste). When the kH is depleted, it cannot protect the pH against acids or bases because the kH is depleted.

Think of it like a sponge. It will suck up water but it has a capacity to the point where it will not hold water anymore.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #12

LittleBlueGuppy

Well Known Member
Messages
924
Reaction score
527
Points
128
Experience
1 year
kH is the buffering capacity of pH. It slowly drops in a closed system because it well, dont know how to explain but water has a property(kH) that allows the pH to be stable while acid or bases or added (aka organism waste). When the kH is depleted, it cannot protect the pH against acids or bases because the kH is depleted.

Think of it like a sponge. It will suck up water but it has a capacity to the point where it will not hold water anymore.
Will their be natural kh/ph raisers in the sand, live rock, etc...? I’ve read a little on this but am still trying to grasp it. Wouldn’t certain substances increase the KH and keep it stable for longer periods of time (like crushed corals, certain substrates, etc), thus, wouldn’t those substances be naturally occurring in sand and rock and such from the seas?
 

FinalFins

Well Known Member
Messages
1,414
Reaction score
693
Points
123
Well, it depends. Not sure on it but ocean water has been used for a long time, thus having low kH. But with such a water mass, the pH stays stable.

Crushed corals are dead coral and sand is usually small pieces of rock.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #15

LittleBlueGuppy

Well Known Member
Messages
924
Reaction score
527
Points
128
Experience
1 year
I was wondering if there would be substances on the beach that would do the same thing? Since I would be collecting rocks and sand and algae from the sea that would most likely have crushed and dead barnacles, corals and shells and such in it so it could sustain its natural kh and ph for a decent period of time. (I could also replenish the kh by adding crushed coral or similar substances later on).

Thoughts and opinions on this logic?
 

stella1979

Moderator
Messages
7,494
Reaction score
9,623
Points
608
Experience
5 to 10 years
Just wanna chime in on sand... Do you guys know that we can thank parrotfish for nearly 100% of the sand on earth? Crazy, right? It's true.:p Most parrotfish eat algae for the most part, chomping down on the rocks where the algae grows with their incredibly strong bite. What are the rocks in the ocean? Dead coral for the most part.;) As the fish eats, very strong teeth grind up the rocks and as the food is digested, the rocks (which are now ground to sand) are excreted as waste. The humphead parrotfish can produce 200 pounds of sand per year. So... what is beach sand? Dead coral.;)
 
Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom