Salt in a Freshwater?

Windchaser
  • #1
Was just wondering about peoples' opinions on putting that API aquarium salt in a freshwater tank and whether or not it's a good thing to do?

Especially wondering so about a cycling tank.

Thanks!
 
COBettaCouple
  • #2
I don't like to put aquarium salt in our Freshwater tanks.
 
jsalemi
  • #3
There are a few freshwater fish that are happier with a little salt in the tank, like mollies and maybe platys, but they can be fine without it, and the vast majority of freshwater fish don't like it at all.

Now, if you were setting up a brackish water tank, it would be a different story...
 
Tom
  • #4
What do you want in the tank? I know that a little bit of salt will help with some diseases.
Tom
 
Windchaser
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
We're not sure what we want in our tank, we have just been kind of getting what community fish that get along and that we like. Prolly not a good method of stocking fish though hehe.

Do Bettas like a little salt in their tank?

Think for now we're just gonna not add any salt to it at all. What about quarantine tanks; is a little salt a good idea there?
 
jsalemi
  • #6
Salt supposedly does help with specific diseases, but even in a quarantine tank I'd add it on an as-needed basis.
 
sirdarksol
  • #7
Betta's water is not brackish, and they would not prefer it on a normal basis. The reason that tonic salt is used for ill fish is that there are cases where a parasite is more harmed by salt than the fish is, or where an infection is attacking the slime coat of a fish (which is aided by salt). The salt will still stress strictly freshwater fish, but usually to a minor extent (there are fish that absolutely loathe salt, so be sure to look up species-specific treatments before using tonic salt). However, if the good is greater than the harm, the tonic salt is worth it.
Some fish, such as mollies and the eel-like dragon gobies, prefer having a bit of salt in their water. In this case, you don't want to use tonic salt, you want to use marine salt (the kind added to Saltwater tanks). Each fish has a specific gravity range that they prefer. Thankfully, brackish fish live in areas where the amount of salt in the water varies from day to day and from square foot to square foot, so they don't have as demanding requirements as full marine fish need. Platinum mollies, for example, can handle pretty much anything from freshwater to heavily brackish, while black mollies can almost survive full saltwater.
 
Windchaser
  • Thread Starter
  • #8
Great, thanks. I'll just keep the main tank salt free. I have put some salt in the Betta's tank, but it's been a while so I need to do a water change to his tank later anyway.

Hopefully I can get the salt out of his tank.
 
sirdarksol
  • #9
Yeah, just keep doing water changes, and you'll slowly lower the salt content in the tank. As long as your betta doesn't seem stressed, there should be no worry. You don't want to change things too quickly, anyway, since a rapid change, even to better quality water, will stress the fish more.
 
Sabi
  • #10
just a quick question...
I know it is harmful to put salt in tanks with scales fish (like plecos). But is it just the salt falling on them that is harmful or even if it is diluted first will it be harmful?
 
COBettaCouple
  • #11
yes, even dissolved it can harm them.

just a quick question...
I know it is harmful to put salt in tanks with scales fish (like plecos). But is it just the salt falling on them that is harmful or even if it is diluted first will it be harmful?
 
sirdarksol
  • #12
just a quick question...
I know it is harmful to put salt in tanks with scales fish (like plecos). But is it just the salt falling on them that is harmful or even if it is diluted first will it be harmful?

As bettacouple said, it's bad for them. I think that, because there are no scales, osmosis pulls the water out through their skin.
 
Butterfly
  • #13
salt is also an irritant and can cause the fish to over produce slime coat.
Carol
 
Sabi
  • #14
Thanks for the input.
 
lyndatu
  • #15
A little of salt can be helpful to your fish (anything except iodized, and I think the best one will be rock salt). It will serve as nutrient salts for your fish, crustaceans, mollusks, as well as your plants. Do you know estuaries? It's a body of water where freshwater and saltwater meet and mix, and more creatures thrive in there. Just one handful of salt and drop it into the water, and too much salt may be harmful to your fish.
 
Butterfly
  • #16
A little of salt can be helpful to your fish (anything except iodized, and I think the best one will be rock salt). It will serve as nutrient salts for your fish, crustaceans, mollusks, as well as your plants. Do you know estuaries? It's a body of water where freshwater and saltwater meet and mix, and more creatures thrive in there. Just one handful of salt and drop it into the water, and too much salt may be harmful to your fish.
Not all freshwater fish are from estuaries so that salt content isn't relavent for all fish.
I really feel a handful of salt is a little much. I believe 1 tablespoon per 5 g is the recommended dose if you are going to use it at all although unless using it for medicinal purposes it is not necessary.
Carol
 
COBettaCouple
  • #17
I would only use salt in a brackish or saltwater tank. our fish are healthier and happier since we stopped adding 1 tbsp of salt to a 10 gallon tank.
 
Sabi
  • #18
I stopped adding salt in my fw tank
 
COBettaCouple
  • #19
i've noticed too that I find the aquarium salt in the medications section in the stores.
 
MaineAttraction
  • #20
I have a ten gallon aquarium with a female gold dust Molly and a male red wagtail platy. I've done some research and found that both of these fish do well in a tank with a small amount of aquarium salt. I'm going to do a pwc tonight and I'm wondering if I should add some salt. If so, how much should I add, and how should I go about adding it?
 
jdhef
  • #21
Those fish will also do well in a tank without salt. So if it were me, I would just skip it.
 
Meeps83
  • #22
I'd skip it too, especial if you have other species in there like catfish or tetras.
 
Aquarist
  • #23
Good morning and Welcome to Fish Lore!

Agreed, salt isn't necessary in a Freshwater Tank. Check out the information in the links below:


The great salt myth

Ken
 
nexigen
  • #24
A lot of places recommend using salt, they claim it calms the fish and prevents Ich. But as long as they have a decent number of hiding places and aren't freaking out when they see you, then they're not stressed. From what I understand, using salt in the long run will shorten their life span and lead to kidney failure - eventually. Just remember, if you choose to use it, it will not evaporate and the only time you would replace salt is when you're changing their water. I don't recall the exact ratio, but I think for a 10 gallon it would be less than 2 TBSP and make sure you dilute it in a glass of tank water first. Otherwise the fish may try to eat it, as it doesn't dissolve right away.
 
LyndaB
  • #25
There's a reason they call it "fresh" water.......
 
Frozenfour
  • #26
Alright I don't know if this has been asked before but what are some opinions on putting a little salt in a freshwater tank? If you do this how much do you put in?
 
junebug
  • #27
There are mixed opinions on whether aquarium salt causes more harm than good. I personally don't find it necessary, most of my fish would agree. I use it for treatment, usually in baths, unless there is an ICH outbreak, then affected tanks get salted.

When using any product in your aquarium, it's crucial to follow the directions. Aquarium salt has very specific instructions on how much to add to a freshwater tank for regular maintenance. Deviating from those instructions is almost certain to cause more harm than good.
 
Coradee
  • #28
I agree with Junebug, I've never used salt as I see no need to.
 
Anders247
  • #29
I agree with the above posts. Salt, imo, should be used for 'salt baths' for treating fin rot or ich.
 
Frozenfour
  • #30
I put salt in my 75 gallon years ago. I have recently purchased a 55 gallon and was debating on doing it again. I didn't see any adverse effects to the fish when I did it back then. Just seeing what everyone else thought about this since the internet appears to show a lot of people who love it and then people who do not recommend it.
 
Anders247
  • #31
Welcome to fishlore, btw!
 
Frozenfour
  • #32
Thanks
 
saints day eve
  • #33
Just read a post about all thefish dying in a members tank. So to help prevent out brakes in tanks can't you add a very small amount to your tank every now and then? Awhile ago a old guy was telling me my barbs could aquarium salt every blue moon and at a pet supply store they put a very small amount in there every now few days to prevent ich. Your thoughts?
 
Anders247
  • #34
No. Aquarium salt imo shouldn't exist. lol
 
Rogue
  • #35
Really? Por Que?
 
Anders247
  • #36
Yes, really. I don't think it should be used, ever. There's better treatments. Especially adding it every "blue moon". That might harm some of the fish.
 
Rogue
  • #37
Yes, really. I don't think it should be used, ever. There's better treatments. Especially adding it every "blue moon". That might harm some of the fish.

It's always nice to know the whys behind opinions
 
Chris99
  • #38
IMO, the regular addition of salt should really only be used for brackish water fish. In that case aquarium salt is not really the right salt to use anyway, it should be marine salt that has the other minerals included.

Salts healing power mainly comes when there is a change in salinity. Many types of pathogens are unable to cope with changes in salt content where as most higher forms of life can adjust to slight changes in salinity. The only way this can be effective is with a change in salt concentration so putting some in with each water change doesn't do much good. As Anders pointed out though several species are sensitive to salt and it can cause more harm than good.
 
matsungit
  • #39
Even brackish tanks are not immune to disease and parasites. Aquarium salt is like snake oil.
 
Smalltownfishfriend
  • #40
I am just curious.. I see some people say absolutely not, it's an old outdated practice. Others say a little bit is a good thing. Just curious as to what your thoughts are on it. Is it out dated,? Does it have it's place? Is it abused??
 

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