Salinity Issue Help

  1. jamie2201

    jamie2201 Member Member

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    Hi guys I'm setting up a sw tank and just can't seem to get the salinity right it's either too high or two low I had it perfect last night but when I got up in the morning it was too low so I added a bit of salt and now it's way too high any suggestions would be a great help
     


  2. ark_fish

    ark_fish Member Member

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    I'm not sure how well it would work in a fish tank but when cooking if your soup is too salty you add a cleaned potato. It should help absorb some salinity and but remove it after 12 hours or so to stop it leaching anything.
    If not, try just small water changes, adding water with a slightly lower salinity than you want. By the way never add salt directly into your tank as it might not dissolve and suddenly raise the salinity when you stir up the bottom. Good luck!
     


  3. grantm91

    grantm91 Fishlore VIP Member

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    How you measuring the salinity? Because its really not that hard when you use a refractometer. c8a8224106ab5ab542d570666c5fcb7c.jpg its only the cheap one but its all you need, great piece of kit.
     
  4. TwoHedWlf

    TwoHedWlf Well Known Member Member

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    Yep, use a refractometer, and make sure you give the tank an hour or so to mix after you add salt or water. (Or salty water, whatever) If you're getting a significant change in salinity overnight either you're seeing errors in how you're measuring it, or the changes aren't significant.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    jamie2201

    jamie2201 Member Member

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  6. grantm91

    grantm91 Fishlore VIP Member

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    Thats your problem put that hydrometer in the junk draw and get that refractometer, and you will be sorted just leave the tank now till you get one let all the salt mix is it clear? Do you have substrate?
     
  7. OP
    OP
    jamie2201

    jamie2201 Member Member

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    Yeah I have a sand substrate I have ordered a refractomoter on eBay as none of the fish stores near me sell them
     
  8. grantm91

    grantm91 Fishlore VIP Member

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    Yeah i got mine from amazon the lfs sell the £30 one but that atc one for £15 is great. You haven't put salt straight in the tank have you as it could settle in the sand.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    jamie2201

    jamie2201 Member Member

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    No I mixed it in a bucket and put it in when dissolved is there a specific way to do it
     
  10. grantm91

    grantm91 Fishlore VIP Member

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    No thats how it's done, seen some crazy cats throwing salt in the tank just thought id ask lol.
     


  11. Nart

    Nart Well Known Member Member

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    Thumbs wayyyy down on hydrometers. I don't even know why they even make them.
    I think you pay like $7 more for wayyyyyyy better accuracy.

    Asides from the refractometer, look into refractometer calibration fluid (35 PPT/1.026 salinity).
    You "can" calibrate the refracto with RODI water at 0 PPT, however, 0PPT calibration is a long ways away from the 1.021 - 1.026 of where you'll be taking your salinity readings at. So by using refracto calibration fluid you increase your the accuracy of your salinity/specific gravity measurements. I think it's only $15, well worth it in the long run, especially when you start spending more money and time on corals.