Salamander/Newt Identification

Gameynerd23

Hello, can someone identify this species of newt or salamander? It's living with a relative, but it's living in a critter carrier with a wet sponge and shirt over it to keep humidity. Please help, this poor guy is breaking my heart. I want to try to help it, but I can't figure out what species it is so I don't know its care requirements.
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otterblue

There's no picture.
 

Gameynerd23

There's no picture.
Sorry, it took a long time to load, there should be one now.
All I know about where it came from is that it was hiding in a door frame, that it's from Missouri, and that it's wild.
 

Cue

A juvenile Eastern newt. Also known as red-spotted newts. They’ll become darker with a yellow belly as they age. It’s native, so you can release it in a forest near a pond or lake. If they took it from the wild, it should be released.
 

otterblue

Was it caught locally - and if so, where are you located?
A juvenile Eastern newt. Also known as red-spotted newts. They’ll become darker with a yellow belly as they age.
Except, they usually have red spots & the juveniles ("red efts") are red and terrestrial.

Although you may be right anyhow.
 

Gameynerd23

A juvenile Eastern newt. Also known as red-spotted newts. They’ll become darker with a yellow belly as they age.
It's not getting good care now and I was surprised it wasn't dead when I check earlier. I'd like to take care of it, but I don't know much about raising newts. I'll see what I can find online, but just to confirm, it will need about half a tank of water, correct? Also, could it go in a 5.5 gallon tank? That's the only tank I have with nothing in it.
 

Cue

It's not getting good care now and I was surprised it wasn't dead when I check earlier. I'd like to take care of it, but I don't know much about raising newts. I'll see what I can find online, but just to confirm, it will need about half a tank of water, correct? Also, could it go in a 5.5 gallon tank? That's the only tank I have with nothing in it.
Otter’s probably right, it doesn’t really look like a eastern newt with those particular spots. I know Fishtery has experience with newts, so they might have some good advice.
 

otterblue

I looked it up & apparently it's a "central newt" - it is the only family of newts in Missouri. (Although it too should have red spots.) You could Google Image it and take a look.

Regardless, the care is probably very smiliar to Eastern Spotted Newts.
 

Gameynerd23

I did message Fishstery, so hopefully I can get some good info from them. I'll keep researching central newts. It's probably been in captivty for 2 months.

Edit: My question is, would it be fine going back in the wild after being captive for so long?
 

Cue

I’m not sure. Newts take advantage of nicer weather and will come out to scavenge in the winter, so if you get a period of warmer weather you could probably release them without any issue. They generally live in forest ponds or lakes, and be sure there’s lots of leaves and logs around for them to hibernate under.

in the meantime, ReptilesMagazine has a good article on eastern newt care, which is probably better than nothing: Eastern Newt Information And Care - Reptiles Magazine
 

Gameynerd23

Thanks for all of the help everyone! Now for the real challenge of getting that relative to let me take the newt.
 

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