Safe to add driftwood to an established aquarium with fish?

jiorio1216

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Hello everyone. I bought two pieces of driftwood for my 55 gallon aquarium that has 3 panda cories, 6 peppered cories, and one honey Gourami. My PH sits at 7.6, and I am trying to get it down a bit so I can stock Rummynose tetra. However, I know fluctuating PH could be dangerous for fish. Would my fish already in the tank be safe with new driftwood going in?
 

esqueff

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As long as the driftwood is sterilized and soaked in clean water for a period of time you should be good to go. As far as the ph thing I really doubt you'll notice it change at all unless you have massive amounts of it. Even if it does lower it it will be so small I doubt it would phase the fish whatsoever. Why are you trying to lower your ph?
 

Mike1995

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It is possible if the wood isn't cleaned first it can create ammonia if added to a tank because of all the particles and dirt etc.
 

Argos

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I believe that you would need a very big, unreasonable piece of driftwood in an aquarium that size to even detect a significant change in pH.

I just added around 8 pounds (a lot) of driftwood to a tank with fish and shrimp and there have been zero changes. It will be fine.

I soaked the driftwood for around 2 or 3 weeks to get out the dirt and some tannins. (along with waterlogging the wood)
 
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jiorio1216

jiorio1216

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esqueff said:
As long as the driftwood is sterilized and soaked in clean water for a period of time you should be good to go. As far as the ph thing I really doubt you'll notice it change at all unless you have massive amounts of it. Even if it does lower it it will be so small I doubt it would phase the fish whatsoever. Why are you trying to lower your ph?
I am actually not trying to, I just want to create more of an environment for my fish from their natural habitats. However, I did want to keep rummynose tetra and have learned that they are tough to keep and need a pretty low PH, so I was hoping this could maybe help.
 

Argos

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jiorio1216 said:
I am actually not trying to, I just want to create more of an environment for my fish from their natural habitats. However, I did want to keep rummynose tetra and have learned that they are tough to keep and need a pretty low PH, so I was hoping this could maybe help.
From what little I know of pH, it isn't a good idea to go chasing a particular number. Far more important is keeping pH stable. In addition, the wood wouldn't be a sustainable way to do such things. I also am unfamiliar with rummynose care, but most fish will adapt to a "less than ideal" pH. Maybe starting a new thread specifically regarding the rummynose will yield more precise information regarding that specific fish.

If you purchase from a local fish store, more often they have similar water parameters as you. (unless they are running RO etc.) If they carry rummys, I would inquire about their water parameters just to double check.
 

flyinGourami

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The driftwood probably won't make much of a difference. I think you'll be fine as long as you keep it stable, I know people who keep rummy noses in higher ph than yours without issues.
Yes I think your fish will be fine.
 

Finlikesfish

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I’m not sure enough about the PH issue to offer any advice, but I would recommend boiling the wood. Often higher temperatures make tannins leach faster, and according to a bit of research I’ve done, boiling it for 1-2 hours can help kill fungi or algae spores. I also believe that soaking/curing and thoroughly cleaning it is helpful, though it’s likely that you know this. Double check that the type of wood is safe if you can.

I’m very inexperienced. Don’t take my word alone, I only read the top google result for researching XD, so I would encourage you to also do your own thorough research.
Tread carefully, good luck!
 

Argos

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I wouldn't boil the wood, but I know many people that do. Boiling the wood will make it degrade exponentially faster. If you buy from a reputable source, you will be fine.
 

Finlikesfish

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Argos said:
I wouldn't boil the wood, but I know many people that do. Boiling the wood will make it degrade exponentially faster. If you buy from a reputable source, you will be fine.
That’s very interesting, I haven’t heard that before!
To find the right decision, I guess I’d just recommend your own thorough research. You could even ask the opinions of those at your LFS if they’re definitely reputable.
Good luck!
 

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