5 Gallon Tank Rummy-nose Tetra, Ich?

Kaixon18

Hello, I need some help to identify and cure my rummy-nose tetras. I have four rummy-nose tetras and I recently quarantined them because of the "white spots".

Firstly, is it Ich that is attacking my rummy-nose tetra? (I've attached the pic of my fish) Sorry, the pic is blurry because they swim so fast. Let me know if I could send any other pics or link to a video of my fish.

If it is, then how can I cure them? I'm currently using aquarium salt and methylene blue. But if it's not, then what is it? I'm sure that from the first I adopted them, they had no white spots on their body.

Please help T_T
Thank you!!
 

SterSter

Most likely is ick...


The ick parasite could have actually been in the rummynose without you knowing. The white spots are kinda like scabs from the ick burrowing into the skin of the fish.

A fish with a strong immune system should be able to tolerate them though...

I’ve had rummy nose that got ick and it spread to my other fish. However, the fish that were infected were just showing mild scraping on rocks or other hardscape.

After I put in aquarium salt in the whole tank the scratching eventually stopped.

It comes back every once and a while though. I’m not even sure if it’s truly gone...

For ick the best thing I can recommend is getting a 5-10g (depending on how much fish have) bare-bottom glass quarantine tank with a sponge filter, heater, and light.

I say sponge filter because if you use a standard HOB filter with carbon it will neutralize the medicine you put in the water. Although you may be able to use an HOB with just the sponge and the cartridge with no carbon inside.

Just slap everything together, let it cycle, and drip acclimate your fish in for at least 40-60min.

Keep the heater temp around 74-76F. The heated water will cause the life cycle of the ick parasite to speed up and cause them to drop their eggs to the ground faster.

You can also have a heater running in the tank as high as you are able (depending also if you have live plants in the tank) to speed up the cycle.

The ick parasites need a host so without a host they quickly starve to death.

Once a week do a 10-15% water change and siphon the water along the bottom of the tank to get all the ick eggs.

After every water change dose the correct amount of aquarium salt and preferred ick medicine into the tank.

In about 2-3 weeks (or a bit more if you want) you can drip acclimate your fish back in the tank.

If you get this quarantine tank if you get any fish or plants you can quarantine them for 2-3 weeks before adding them to the main tank to prevent illness to your other fish.

Best of luck to you hope this helps!
 
Upvote 0

Kaixon18

Most likely is ick...


The ick parasite could have actually been in the rummynose without you knowing. The white spots are kinda like scabs from the ick burrowing into the skin of the fish.

A fish with a strong immune system should be able to tolerate them though...

I’ve had rummy nose that got ick and it spread to my other fish. However, the fish that were infected were just showing mild scraping on rocks or other hardscape.

After I put in aquarium salt in the whole tank the scratching eventually stopped.

It comes back every once and a while though. I’m not even sure if it’s truly gone...

For ick the best thing I can recommend is getting a 5-10g (depending on how much fish have) bare-bottom glass quarantine tank with a sponge filter, heater, and light.

I say sponge filter because if you use a standard HOB filter with carbon it will neutralize the medicine you put in the water. Although you may be able to use an HOB with just the sponge and the cartridge with no carbon inside.

Just slap everything together, let it cycle, and drip acclimate your fish in for at least 40-60min.

Keep the heater temp around 74-76F. The heated water will cause the life cycle of the ick parasite to speed up and cause them to drop their eggs to the ground faster.

You can also have a heater running in the tank as high as you are able (depending also if you have live plants in the tank) to speed up the cycle.

The ick parasites need a host so without a host they quickly starve to death.

Once a week do a 10-15% water change and siphon the water along the bottom of the tank to get all the ick eggs.

After every water change dose the correct amount of aquarium salt and preferred ick medicine into the tank.

In about 2-3 weeks (or a bit more if you want) you can drip acclimate your fish back in the tank.

If you get this quarantine tank if you get any fish or plants you can quarantine them for 2-3 weeks before adding them to the main tank to prevent illness to your other fish.

Best of luck to you hope this helps!

Thank you for your response, appreciated it.

Sorry for replying up till just now. I was really concerned about my fish.
Thankfully, four of my rummy nose-tetra recovered from the ick just a day after I posted this thread. Before returning my rummy-nose tetras back, I added a heater and an aquarium thermometer to my tank. I thought to prevent the ick, I had to raise the temp for about 30 degree celsius.

After I moved four of them back to my tank, the first thing I saw after getting up from my bed was the dead rummy-nose. One of my tetras was just floating with no life. I suppose this is because of the sudden temp change from the quarantine tank to my main tank? Because I surfed on the internet and found out that rummy-nose is sensitive to water temperature. It was my bad, I should've acclimated them first before returning them directly to the main tank.

But now I'm concerned about other stuffs. I have three remaining rummy-nose tetras currently. One of them is breathing rapidly since two days ago. I couldn't identify what are the causes for it to breathe like that. The other two are just fine. On and one more thing, I also added an air stone to support oxygen in the tank. I heard that the warmer the temperature of a tank is, the less oxygen it has.

Secondly, I am confused about neon tetra's behavior. I have six of them at the time but this morning I found that one of them is hiding below my artificial bridge decoration. Is it normal for neon tetra to hide and should I not be worried about it or there's something else..?

I'll really appreciate any help to my problems.

Thank you!
 
Upvote 0

SterSter

If I’m correct you quarantined your fish and they all recovered.

You then put them back in the main tank right away that was heated to 30degrees Celsius

One of the rummy’s died which you suspect may be due to the sudden change in temperature.

Now however one of the rummy’s is breathing rapidly but the others are fine. Your neon tetras are hiding in an artificial decoration as well.

Both the rapid breathing and the hiding is probably due to stress. Your two other rummy’s are probably stronger than other fish but they may start showing signs soon.

For this you should try reducing the temp from 30degrees C to 25degree C and see if the signs persist still over a few days. If not then reduce the temp overtime until they start becoming comfortable.

15-20% water changes every 2-3 weeks help as well. After every water change put in more aquarium salt proportionate to the amount of water taken out. Or you could eyeball it just make sure you don’t put too much in.

You could also give the fish high protein foods like frozen bloodworms or brine shrimp to boost their systems and help get their strengths back up.

Feel Free to ask more questions if the problem persists.
 
Upvote 0

Kaixon18

If I’m correct you quarantined your fish and they all recovered.

You then put them back in the main tank right away that was heated to 30degrees Celsius

One of the rummy’s died which you suspect may be due to the sudden change in temperature.

Now however one of the rummy’s is breathing rapidly but the others are fine. Your neon tetras are hiding in an artificial decoration as well.

Both the rapid breathing and the hiding is probably due to stress. Your two other rummy’s are probably stronger than other fish but they may start showing signs soon.

For this you should try reducing the temp from 30degrees C to 25degree C and see if the signs persist still over a few days. If not then reduce the temp overtime until they start becoming comfortable.

15-20% water changes every 2-3 weeks help as well. After every water change put in more aquarium salt proportionate to the amount of water taken out. Or you could eyeball it just make sure you don’t put too much in.

You could also give the fish high protein foods like frozen bloodworms or brine shrimp to boost their systems and help get their strengths back up.

Feel Free to ask more questions if the problem persists.

Thank you for the help, appreciated it.

Do I have to reduce the temp gradually or should I set it directly to 25 degrees celsius by the heater?

FYI, my aquarium temp before I added the heater was around 27 degrees celsius, is it okay to lower it until 25?

And about the frozen bloodworms; beside tetras, I also have a cory, some cae, and guppies. Is it alright to also give them the food?

Update: Got another question!

Over these last seven days, I have been doing quarantine to my guppies with ick. I checked them yesterday and they have no remaining white spots on their body. They have good appetite. No signs of other illness.

I want to move them back to my main tank. In order to do that, I should acclimate them first, right? Can I do it by putting my guppies in some sort of a plastic bag, like the first time I bought them? Or should I use other media to acclimate them?
 
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SterSter

Lower the temperature gradually if you can. If the heater is adjustable then dial the knob down every few days or so. You can then take the heater out because 27 degrees C is perfect for your fish so you wouldn't need to lower the temperature any lower.

You can give the frozen bloodworms or any other frozen or live food to your other fish as well. Frozen foods give the fish strength and keep them in tip top condition. Even if the food is medicated you would still want to give them to the other fish. This is to prevent any other illness (kind of like a vaccine).

To acclimate your guppies back to the main tank I recommend drip acclimating them.
Here is a link to a video on fishlore

Acclimating Fish to Your Aquarium

This will allow the fish to get acclimate to not only the temperature but the water parameters as well.
 
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