Rosy Boa 75 Gallon Tank

Discussion in 'Reptiles' started by MrFishkeeper1, Aug 23, 2019.

  1. MrFishkeeper1

    MrFishkeeper1Valued MemberMember

    Messages:
    94
    Ratings:
    +19
    Experience:
    2 years
    I read that you should start with a smaller tank for a snake and work your way up. This to me just seems weird that a animal no matter what size wouldn't want as much space as possible. Do I have to work my way up to a 75 gallon, starting out at like a 20 then a 40 and then a 75. This just seems like a waste of money, plus I am going to get some type of board/or paper and put it so it goes up the sides of the tank 1/2 way to 2/3 of the way up. (It is in a corner so the back and right side are *hidden* per say) I would also give it a lot of climbing space and fake plants and 2+ hides, Is this ok. (Dimensions L 48in by H 21in by W 18in).
     
  2. Aquilist

    AquilistWell Known MemberMember

    Messages:
    586
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Ratings:
    +350
    Experience:
    1 year
    When they're hatchlings, it's best to keep them in a small tub. Once the snakes grow a bit bigger, they're transferred to a larger tank. How old is the snake you're planning on getting?
     
  3. OP
    OP
    MrFishkeeper1

    MrFishkeeper1Valued MemberMember

    Messages:
    94
    Ratings:
    +19
    Experience:
    2 years
    I plan on getting a smaller snake/hatchling I am new to reptile keeping.
     
  4. Aquilist

    AquilistWell Known MemberMember

    Messages:
    586
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Ratings:
    +350
    Experience:
    1 year
    Ok, younger snakes prefer smaller spaces as they feel less threatened.
    A small hatchling can stay in a click-clack style enclosure whilst they are still small. Here's a link on how to make one (Sorry if I'm not allowed to post external links, but this is the best tutorial I have found)
    How To Set-up A Hatchling Python Tub

    Once the Hatchie is old enough to outgrow its click-clack, you can place their click-clack into their new tank.
    I recommend you slide the lid back on the click-clack about 50 mm and taped it in place temporarily so they could use their click clacks as hides until they got used to exploring their new home.
    This will result in minimum stress.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    MrFishkeeper1

    MrFishkeeper1Valued MemberMember

    Messages:
    94
    Ratings:
    +19
    Experience:
    2 years
    So should I let it stay in there longer than a week?, and let it grow (how big) or can I just let it come out into the tank after 1 or 2 weeks.
     
  6. Aquilist

    AquilistWell Known MemberMember

    Messages:
    586
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Ratings:
    +350
    Experience:
    1 year
    Hatchlings (of 20-25cm long) can stay in a shoebox-sized tub for 2 or 3 months, or once the snake has tripled in size. Then they can be moved into a 45x25cm floorspace tub. They can actually stay in these tubs for around a year, or even longer as snakes grow pretty slowly.

    You could always start the hatchling out in a 45x25cm floorspace tub and add many hides.

    After a year or so, the snake can move into his forever home.

    This website has info on snake-tub size Cage Size
    (it is about a different species of snake, but it's still similar)

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 26, 2019
  7. OP
    OP
    MrFishkeeper1

    MrFishkeeper1Valued MemberMember

    Messages:
    94
    Ratings:
    +19
    Experience:
    2 years
    Lol I have already been reading off of this website but thank you it is very informative. I have actually been reading off of another website too, and have been watching reptile youtubers too.

    I didn't know it would take so long for a snake to be ready to live in its final home, thank you for all of this information.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 26, 2019
  8. Alexolotl

    AlexolotlValued MemberMember

    Messages:
    311
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +146
    Experience:
    2 years
    OKAY SOME CLARIFICATIONS NEED TO BE MADE HERE

    Excuse long post and probably poor formatting, I’m kinda tired atm

    First off, no, snakes do not dislike big spaces. What they DO dislike is big OPEN spaces. The idea you should go for a smaller enclosure is something made by unscrupulous breeders trying to save a quick buck. If an enclosure has enough hides and clutter, the sky is the limit.

    HOWEVER, you probably should grow your snake up in a 10 gallon bin if you go for a baby. The reasoning behind this is that it’s harder for a tiny baby snake to access its needs like a hot side vs cool side, and they’re really hard to find in such a vast enclosure, especially as rosy boas burrow somewhat frequently.
    Plus, it is certainly easier to make a baby snake more secure in a confined space, as you don’t need as much clutter to have it densely cluttered, and the snake never has to go far from a hide for very long at all.

    If you prefer to upsize your enclosure gradually, you can do it with progressively larger bins until it’s big enough for display tank. To be rather honest, with a rosy I doubt you’d need more than a 10 gallon to reach a reasonable subadult size to upgrade. A good rule of thumb is the length of the enclosure plus the depth on one side (front to back) should always equal or exceed the length of the snake. If it gets any longer than that, time to upgrade.

    Rosy boas don’t actually NEED anything bigger than a 20 gallon long, but so long as it’s older and can get from place to place easily and stealthily, your snake will rather enjoy a big enclosure. Props to you for attempting to provide something big! Given plenty of exploration opportunities (including climbing, rosy boas can and will climb) your boa will make the most out of that space and will be a very happy animal.

    I would just be sure to have at least four hides around the enclosure and plenty of clutter to help your snake feel comfortable.
    I would also suggest using a ceramic heat emitter rather than a heat mat, as it heats the air as well as the floor and will encourage your snake to be more active in the enclosure more frequently.

    Good luck with your rosy!
     
  9. OP
    OP
    MrFishkeeper1

    MrFishkeeper1Valued MemberMember

    Messages:
    94
    Ratings:
    +19
    Experience:
    2 years
    Thank you so much I was debating weither or not to use the tank as a snake habitat or to switch back to the idea of a turtle tank or a fish tank because I don't want to wait a year plus for it to grow. From what you said I think I should get a 20 gallon long or a tub, and have it live in their for 3-4 months or so possible longer (after it is finished in the hatchling tub of course) and then put it in the big tank. BTW could I reuse the 20 gallon as a fish tank after the snake has lived in it?
     
  10. Alexolotl

    AlexolotlValued MemberMember

    Messages:
    311
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +146
    Experience:
    2 years
    Yeah, you could probably get away with that, but a tub is gonna be way cheaper to grow the snake in. I wouldn’t know much about rosy boa growth rates, but I doubt it’ll grow a whole lot in 3-4 months. You could reasonably expect the snake to be in that tub for a year, perhaps more. I’d do more research, perhaps ask around in more reptile-dedicated forums and such. Research is crucial. Just keep on researching and learning everything you can about the animal you like. It’ll make it easier to keep the animal happy and healthy that way.
     
  11. OP
    OP
    MrFishkeeper1

    MrFishkeeper1Valued MemberMember

    Messages:
    94
    Ratings:
    +19
    Experience:
    2 years
    Ok, thank you I will think/look into this some more. When I buy the snake it should hopefully be over a foot long as the websites I have looked at to buy them have the them listed for 12-14in + so hopefully I can put it in the Tank at 20-24inches as they only grow to be 24-36 possible larger.
     
Loading...