Room For An Sae?

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Gersh

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DutchAquarium

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you might beable to get away with one when he is smaller, but they can get a bit aggresive when they get bigger. They also prefer colder temps than most species on your list. Lastly, make sure your actually getting an siamese algae eater and not a flying fox.
 
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Gersh

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DutchAquarium said:
you might beable to get away with one when he is smaller, but they can get a bit aggresive when they get bigger. They also prefer colder temps than most species on your list. Lastly, make sure your actually getting an siamese algae eater and not a flying fox.
I was debating between an SAE and ottos. Would Ottos be a better fit?

How do you tell the difference?
 

Wobbegong

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Nah, ottos also like cooler temps too, they also like to be in a school more than the SAE.
 

DutchAquarium

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Sae are the same color on both sides of the black line while flying foxes are a bit darker on the top half. Sae eat algae, foxes don't. I would becareful with otos also since they sometimes get a taste for the slime coat on angels. and they like it coldeer.
 
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Gersh

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DutchAquarium said:
Sae are the same color on both sides of the black line while flying foxes are a bit darker on the top half. Sae eat algae, foxes don't. I would becareful with otos also since they sometimes get a taste for the slime coat on angels. and they like it coldeer.
Wobbegong said:
Nah, ottos also like cooler temps too, they also like to be in a school more than the SAE.
Gotcha. I'm trying to find something to help keep algae in check. Any thoughts?
 

DarkOne

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SAEs are schoolers so you should get at least 3. They don't get aggressive like CAEs as they get bigger and they are fine in the temp ranges with your fish. You should do regular 25% water changes weekly and they should thrive. They will graze on algae as well as any other foods you put in the tank. I have 3 in a heavily planted 40b with 15 rummynose tetras and 12 peppered cories and 4 in a lightly planted 75 gallon with 2 EBA (30-40 EBA babies currently), a couple of plecos (Blue Phantom and BN) and 8 bronze cories. All my SAEs are under 3" and no issues with aggression to any tank mates at all. They follow the EBAs to the top of the tank during feeding time.
 

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a schooling species needs at least 6 since 3 will often lead to an odd one out or aggression. All the siamese algae eaters and simialr fish tend to find out in my experience that they like the slime coatings on wide bodied fish.
 

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If your 4-5 snails aren't able to keep up with algae, then you may need to look at lowering your light period, splitting it or looking at your water change schedule. There really shouldn't be so much algae that you actually need to try to get a fish to combat it. You are the best cleaner/algae remover that your tank has.
 

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DutchAquarium said:
All the siamese algae eaters and simialr fish tend to find out in my experience that they like the slime coatings on wide bodied fish.
From my experience, I’m not sure I agree with that.
 

jmaldo

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Go ahead and get them. As mentioned make sure they are SAE. I have 2 in a Planted 55 Community. Just be aware they are like torpedoes with jetpacks when they are playing tag. I got mine they were about 1.5 inches over the past year they have grown to almost 4 inches. Crazy fast. Here is a pic:

SAE 2.jpg
 

DutchAquarium

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jmaldo said:
Go ahead and get them. As mentioned make sure they are SAE. I have 2 in a Planted 55 Community. Just be aware they are like torpedoes with jetpacks when they are playing tag. I got mine they were about 1.5 inches over the past year they have grown to almost 4 inches. Crazy fast. Here is a pic:

SAE 2.jpg
are you sure those are Sae? I can't quite make out the tale stripe in the picture, but the top half of the stripe doesn't appear to match with Sae even the older ones.
 

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"SAE" includes 7 known species of the Crossicheilus genus, and they aren't all identified yet. One of the known species maxes out at 4", another at 3", and the rest I've had (including C Langei, the most common) are around 6". Also, commonly mistaken species include a piscivore, and the only way to differentiate a juvenile is by the shape of the lower lip (grab a microscope). C LangeI is a schooling fish when they are nervous, but 3 is enough if there aren't any predators.
 
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Gersh

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Galathiel said:
If your 4-5 snails aren't able to keep up with algae, then you may need to look at lowering your light period, splitting it or looking at your water change schedule. There really shouldn't be so much algae that you actually need to try to get a fish to combat it. You are the best cleaner/algae remover that your tank has.
I do weekly water changes (about 50%) and dose EI when I do a water change. My photo period is 7ish hours. Could it just be BBA got a foot hold and isn't letting go? I figured since I had it stopped, SAE would be able to help me clear it out and it would stay gone at the point.

I agree. I thinking finding the source of the issue is more important than getting a band aid, but I've tried just about everything I can to limit growth.
 

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Mick Frost said:
"SAE" includes 7 known species of the Crossicheilus genus, and they aren't all identified yet. One of the known species maxes out at 4", another at 3", and the rest I've had (including C Langei, the most common) are around 6". Also, commonly mistaken species include a piscivore, and the only way to differentiate a juvenile is by the shape of the lower lip (grab a microscope). C LangeI is a schooling fish when they are nervous, but 3 is enough if there aren't any predators.
Do you have any experience with the reticulated flying fox (C. reticulatus)?
 

Mick Frost

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Gersh said:
Do you have any experience with the reticulated flying fox (C. reticulatus)?
No. Most of my experiences were with misidentified SAE, though I did end up with a red once.
 
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