Rocks in Aquarium

Shashank1008

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Hello All,

I will be setting up a new planted tank in a few days. I've thought of using stones in my aquarium and have a few ideas on the scape. I'll be using 3 huge dragonstone rocks in the aquarium. The 3 rocks combined amounts to 10kg. This is my first time using stones in an aquarium and am a little worried that the pressure might cause the bottom part of the glass to crack or break. Can anybody help me with any ways to use the rocks in the aquarium without cracking or breaking it.

Thanks in advance
 

Ghelfaire

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Put the substrate down first then add the rocks. That way they aren't directly on the glass.
How big is the tank?
 

Mike1995

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Well, be sure you have a substrate obviously. the best thing I can think of is keep sharp pointy parts of the rock away from the glass bottom.
 

MoshJosh

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As said above, you can just make sure there’s substrate underneath the rocks deep enough to prevent them from actually touching the glass. Alternatively you could put something under the rocks to help distribute pressure. SerpaDesign (think that’s the name) Uses egg crate light diffuser underneath big pieces of hard scape, And you could also silicone your hard scape to the egg crate if you wanted it to lay it in a certain position. In the scape that I just did, I used strips of filter foam I had lying around under the heavy rock. . . Seems to work well. Either way you’ll be covering the stuff with substrate so you can’t see it in the end.
 
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Shashank1008

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Ghelfaire said:
Put the substrate down first then add the rocks. That way they aren't directly on the glass.
How big is the tank?
These are the measurement of the tank 36L*15W*17H(Inches). How thick should I lay the substrate before placing the rocks??
 

A201

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Your new rocks will displace a substantial amount of water lessening the actual weight the rocks actually add to the tank.
Chances are that if your stand is leveled and sturdy, an average sized man could stand inside your tank without it breaking.
"Don't try this at home" Lol. My primary tank has over two hundred pounds of rock in it w/ no problems.
Be sure to post pics as things progress with the hardscape.
 
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Shashank1008

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MoshJosh said:
As said above, you can just make sure there’s substrate underneath the rocks deep enough to prevent them from actually touching the glass. Alternatively you could put something under the rocks to help distribute pressure. SerpaDesign (think that’s the name) Uses egg crate light diffuser underneath big pieces of hard scape, And you could also silicone your hard scape to the egg crate if you wanted it to lay it in a certain position. In the scape that I just did, I used strips of filter foam I had lying around under the heavy rock. . . Seems to work well. Either way you’ll be covering the stuff with substrate so you can’t see it in the end.
Thanks a lot for the reply.
If I used the filter foam, could I try and pile up the rocks to create sort of a cave for the scape.

A201 said:
Your new rocks will displace a substantial amount of water lessening the actual weight the rocks actually add to the tank.
Chances are that if your stand is leveled and sturdy, an average sized man could stand inside your tank without it breaking.
"Don't try this at home" Lol. My primary tank has over two hundred pounds of rock in it w/ no problems.
Be sure to post pics as things progress with the hardscape.
Thank you for replying.
I am just worried about individual pressure points and I wanted to save on what I'd spend on the substrate.
 

A201

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Three inches of substrate should be more than enough as to avert any potential problems.
 

COHiker

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Mike1995 said:
Well, be sure you have a substrate obviously. the best thing I can think of is keep sharp pointy parts of the rock away from the glass bottom.
Some hobbiest use thin plastic egg crate under their rockwork to protect the glass. Major advantage is that its easy to cut. (click)

Fully loaded a tank will way ~9 lbs per gallon because of the water rock etc. So it'll be heavy regardless of the rock. Some hobbiest buy a specific "self leveling matt" for under the tank, which is supposed to reduce tress on the tank if the tank isn't level. or on a flat surface. The intent is to reduce chance of glass break. I haven't seen evidence of how well it works.

In my nano, I filled a filter media bag with pea gravel or lava rock and and then placed the rock on top of that. The advantage of the filter bag is that it is moldable and helped me place the rock in a specific orientation. It also might help if you have some "digging" fish varieties. Afterwards I covered the exposed bag with more substrate.

I've also had rock directly on glass in a 20 gallon and as long as it doesn't tip over or fall inside the tank I think you'd be fine. The previous methods are just "additional" protection.
 

Mike1995

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COHiker said:
Some hobbiest use thin plastic egg crate under their rockwork to protect the glass. Major advantage is that its easy to cut. (click)

Fully loaded a tank will way ~9 lbs per gallon because of the water rock etc. So it'll be heavy regardless of the rock. Some hobbiest buy a specific "self leveling matt" for under the tank, which is supposed to reduce tress on the tank if the tank isn't level. or on a flat surface. The intent is to reduce chance of glass break. I haven't seen evidence of how well it works.

In my nano, I filled a filter media bag with pea gravel or lava rock and and then placed the rock on top of that. The advantage of the filter bag is that it is moldable and helped me place the rock in a specific orientation. It also might help if you have some "digging" fish varieties. Afterwards I covered the exposed bag with more substrate.

I've also had rock directly on glass in a 20 gallon and as long as it doesn't tip over or fall inside the tank I think you'd be fine. The previous methods are just "additional" protection.

I simply just use substrate. I have 3-4" of it in all my tanks. Rocks haven't moved lol.
 

clark12

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A201 said:
Your new rocks will displace a substantial amount of water lessening the actual weight the rocks actually add to the tank.
Chances are that if your stand is leveled and sturdy, an average sized man could stand inside your tank without it breaking.
"Don't try this at home" Lol. My primary tank has over two hundred pounds of rock in it w/ no problems.
Be sure to post pics as things progress with the hardscape.
Can we see this tank? Rocks are one of my favorite parts of a tank... and my yard!
 

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