Rock Kribensis In 20 Gallon

FinalFins

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I wouldn't keep a krib in anything less then a 40.

Also, what type of pleco? only a few are doable in a 20 gallon. Also rasboras should be in groups 6+
 
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Doomheadthebetta

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I wouldn't keep a krib in anything less then a 40.

Also, what type of pleco? only a few are doable in a 20 gallon. Also rasboras should be in groups 6+
Ya I started reading more about them and if they like caves, I don't think Twisty would want to share his driftwood cave. Not enough space to add another cave. But twisty isn't aggressive though. Twisty is a clown pleco. And I'm positive he's male.
Do you know of any other "center piece" fish thats pretty and not aggressive? Im looking at cockatoo cichlids but I don't know.
 

FinalFins

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Oh ok. A clown pleco is acceptable.

A pair of honey gouramis would look cool or go for a different style of centerpiece, AKA making your rasbora numbers 10-12
 
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Doomheadthebetta

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Oh ok. A clown pleco is acceptable.

A pair of honey gouramis would look cool or go for a different style of centerpiece, AKA making your rasbora numbers 10-12
Yea I had to get a pleco. I love them lol
I actually want to avoid dwarf gouramis for now. Mine recently died and he was my center piece. I will get more Rasboras though
 

chromedome52

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"Rock Kribensis" isn't a Krib-type. It is a Victorian Hap, Paralabidochromis sauvagei, and does not need a cave as they are mouthbrooders. It got the name Rock Krib because of the color pattern of the male resembling a common Krib. They may eat the Rasboras, kill the snails (or eat them, depending on the type of snail), and harass the Pleco. However, get rid of the other fish and a 20 gallon tank would be fine for a trio of Rock Kribs!

And Honey Gouramis are a different species than Dwarf Gouramis. Related, but not the same species. And don't confuse color varieties with species.
 
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Doomheadthebetta

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"Rock Kribensis" isn't a Krib-type. It is a Victorian Hap, Paralabidochromis sauvagei, and does not need a cave as they are mouthbrooders. It got the name Rock Krib because of the color pattern of the male resembling a common Krib. They may eat the Rasboras, kill the snails (or eat them, depending on the type of snail), and harass the Pleco. However, get rid of the other fish and a 20 gallon tank would be fine for a trio of Rock Kribs!

And Honey Gouramis are a different species than Dwarf Gouramis. Related, but not the same species. And don't confuse color varieties with species.
Ohh then I won't get one, it took forever to get my pleco and I love everything in my tank now, I think I'll just get guppies and more Rasboras. All the fish I like are aggressive and will outgrow my small 20. Lol
 

MikeRad89

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Did some research on those, still wouldnt keep em in anything less than 50.

edit- 40 gal
It's borderline ridiculous to suggest that rock kribs require a 40 gallon tank. An twenty, even if it's a 20 high, is perfectly acceptable.
 
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Doomheadthebetta

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I cand imagine fitting 2 5-inch fish into a tank with a 24 inch length.
Lol I already know that they wouldn't be happy in my tiny tank I'm just going to buy as many Rasboras that will fit and be happy in my tiny tank and then it will be done until I can buy a bigger tank.
 

chromedome52

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First, females don't get as big as males. Second, never trust anything fishy from a Wiki. Third, the biggest male I ever saw was about 4 inches at the ACA convention. They just don't normally get that big in aquaria. I would also point out that all three references use the old genus of Haplochromis. The current/correct genus name is Paralabidochromis.

And OP doesn't want them anyway. A more appropriate African Dwarf for that tank would be Nannochromis transvestitus. It stays small and likes softer water. However, a pair would need a cave with a very small opening.
 
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Doomheadthebetta

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First, females don't get as big as males. Second, never trust anything fishy from a Wiki. Third, the biggest male I ever saw was about 4 inches at the ACA convention. They just don't normally get that big in aquaria. I would also point out that all three references use the old genus of Haplochromis. The current/correct genus name is Paralabidochromis.

And OP doesn't want them anyway. A more appropriate African Dwarf for that tank would be Nannochromis transvestitus. It stays small and likes softer water. However, a pair would need a cave with a very small opening.
Well not anymore I will eventually get them lol I love the yellow color. I saw a bunch of babies at a fish store but they told me they'll destroy my plants and fight my betta I had in the 20 gallon.
So thank you for responding! :)
 
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