RO/DI Filter- How can i attach one to my sink?

INeedHelpLol

hey! doing my research currently before I step into the saltwater arena. I'd love to be able to set up an RO/DI unit, but we live in an apartment and I don't think the landlords would be too happy with us tinkering with their pipes too much. I'd like to possible connect the unit to either the bathroom or kitchen faucet, but doesn't seem like they have threads. here are some pictures: and no, foesn't look like there are ways to remove any part of the faucet?


any assidtance/advice is welcome!!
 

John58ford

You don't have to mess with the pipes but you do need to do this under the counter. There should be 2 knobs under the sink, one hot, one cold. There should be flexible stainless hoses with threaded fittings. Sometimes they're copper pipe, but still threaded, you can replace this temporarily with stainless and set it aside to be put back after moving. You would need to get a splitter for the cold side, then build a stand that can hold up a 3, 4 or 5 bank filter system so you don't have to drill into the cabinet. Select the filter system of your choice and maybe a holding tank and screw it in. You can connect low pressure hoses (like 1/2" RV potable or food grade hoses) to the system and fill your mixing buckets from the system directly.

You may want to ask your landlord if it would be ok to install a permanent system under the kitchen sink, allot of people do that for coffee pots and other drinks anyways, then you don't have to be sneaky.
 

Barrk2

What about your shower? Most showers have removable heads- you could probably find a plumbing piece to attach something small to. Bonus points because there’s a drain in case you forget it!
 

PAcanis

Your first picture looks like it has a piece that unscrews. Typically that is what the screen and water flow plastic thingy are in. Then you buy an adapter that replaces it and has the threads you need on the other end. Or the RO hose hookup. Your bathroom sink faucet should have the same thing.

Just a note: I was searching RO units the other day and read that if you are in NYC you should use a sediment prefilter before the RO unit. Apparently your water is not filtered like most water companies. It is simply "treated".
And that could complicate your hookup. Still doable though. It will take up more room.
 

MacZ

I was searching RO units the other day and read that if you are in NYC you should use a sediment prefilter before the RO unit.
Sediment filter and activated carbon filters are standard-stages of an RO unit.

Usually smaller units hook up to the faucet itself (unscrew the aerator part, screw on the adapter for the unit) or to the shower faucet (where the hose is hooked in). The latter may need an additional adapter piece, costs only a buck or two at the hardware store.
 

PAcanis

Sediment filter and activated carbon filters are standard-stages of an RO unit.

Yes.
But in the case of one RO system manufacturer, they feel it is necessary to filter NYC's water before it goes into their unit. I imagine it's so it doesn't have to work as hard and their filters last longer.

It's the Buddie unit we were just discussing. Maybe you can shoot them an email and ask them why.
 

MacZ

It's the Buddie unit we were just discussing. Maybe you can shoot them an email and ask them why.
Pass. Been to NYC over 20 years ago, can easily imagine the public water supply system being partially in bad enough condition so this is necessary for warranty reasons.
 

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