Resealing a 120 gallon tank?

Hemikyle

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Hello everyone! So here's the question I have a 125 gallon aquarium along with a 120 gallon aquarium. The 125 tank has been re sealed and holds water but the top corners the silicone wasn't all the way to the top so you can't fill it all the way. Now the 120 tank doesn't have any seal it's been scrapped from previous owner, I figured well if we do the 120 re seal why not fix the 125 also. But roughly same sizes. Now here's my big question. I read that it's not worth re sealing a tank because it compromises the inner seam where the glasses are held together. So is it worth resealing or should I get rid of it all and get what I can and get a new 125 gallon aquarium?
 

SM1199

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It is very worth re-sealing a tank. I have done so myself before on a tank that was previously leaking at an alarming rate. Everything held up long after I re-sealed.

If done right, you shouldn't be touching the inner glass seam at all when you're stripping the water-proofing silicone. You just have to make sure your knife never slides in between the glass seam. It helps if you have a sort of fat knife that is still very sharp, since if it's the thickness of a box cutter (for example), it will have an easier time sliding in between those panes unintentionally. As compared to something like a folding pocket knife, which won't slide between the panes easily.

If I had a 125 on hand that just needed re-sealing and nothing else, I'd definitely take that over spending hundreds on a new 125! Make sure to test it by filling it all the way or nearly all the way after you reseal but before you bring it inside your home to make sure it does, in fact, hold water and remain structurally sound. Also make sure to do that on a very level surface so the seams don't twist and break the glass panes, especially on a tank of that size.
 

FishGirl38

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Whoa? I don't know where you read that but it'd kind of silly. Was it on an aquarium manufactures website? of course they want you to purchase a new tank.

I would disagree though, resealing a tank of that volume can be a bit...scary. I've resealed a 75G that...about 6months after the fact we suspected was leaking again so it's now a reptile enclosure....though, we never 100% tested it, We judged that based on evaporation but, it was changing to winter, and I didn't have a complete lid on the tank. No water damage on the wood stand though, so I'm assuming it was mostly due to evap.

mmmm, if you're confident in your resealing ability, I would give it a shot - though I would absolutely make sure to seal it 100%. Not only does the seal stop the seams from leaking, but it keeps the entire tank sturdy. If you've got any weak points in the seam, the entire tank could bust due to the force of the water pushing from inside. Even if the seal weakness is somewhere where there is no water, it could still spell overall integrity problems for the tank.
 

saltwater60

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I’d definitely reseal the tank. Look at the king of DIY on YouTube great videos about this.
 

goldfishbeginner

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Dont be affraid to do the reseal. It helps if you are somewhat OCD about details though. Old silicone needs to be completely cleaned off. I use a razor blade widget and acetone on small micorfiber towels to get let over residue. But you have to be carefull with the seam when using the razor blade.

Its harder to make a mistake on the tank with 1/2" thick glass. The seam holding the sides together is a full 1/2" of silicone.

I can say from experience that you can't just lay down all the silicone and spread the seals in one shot. You should do bottom seals first (I used silicone speader kit off ebay) then do the corners one or two at a time. If you try to lay it down all at once amd spread seals all at once, by the time you are finished the silicone that you first laid down may start to partially dry on the outside and give you a messy looking seal when you go spead the seal.. This is why with a big tank I smooth certain sections out at a time.

Both of my resealed tanks are fine. I followed king of diy instructions to do my first 72bf and then I already knew what I needed to do my second 125g.
 

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