Reptile/amphibian Options For 10 Gal

Discussion in 'Freshwater Fish and Invertebrates' started by Miranda920, Aug 24, 2019.

  1. Miranda920

    Miranda920New MemberMember

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    Hi everyone,
    I have a ten gallon tank that’s empty and I wanna put something other than fish in it. I was thinking some sort of reptile or amphibian. I obviously wanna research anything before I purchase an animal but wanted options as to what I can put in there. I also don’t want to have to spend $300 on supplies/materials for a new animal.
    Thank you for any and all responses
     
  2. bettaf1sh 7789

    bettaf1sh 7789Valued MemberMember

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    I think in a 10 gallon you’d have a hard time creating a cold and warm side. I’ve heard small anoles can live in 10 gallons, although I’m not entirely sure. Maybe like a green anole? Besides the tank, what supplies do you already have?
     
  3. scarface

    scarfaceFishlore VIPMember

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    Ribbon snake, garter snake, Pacman frog, or even a leopard gecko could all work, off the top of my head.
     
  4. bettaf1sh 7789

    bettaf1sh 7789Valued MemberMember

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    Don’t know anything about either snake, but I wouldn’t recommend 10 gallons for an adult pacman frog, a juvenile would be okay, but I’ve seen them get as large as a small plate (6” across) 10 gallons seems a little small to me. Leos too, a juvenile would be okay but a 20 long would be better for an adult, especially considering a 10 gallon is 20 inches long (I think?) and Leos can get to be 8-10 inches in length. If you’re looking for a reptile that could be housed in a 10 gallon now and then upgraded both the Pacman frog and leopard gecko would be good. For snakes, corn snakes and king snakes are also some good options, possibly a very young ball python, but you’d need to upgrade pretty quickly, my adult male uses his entire 75 gallon tank. For lizards the Leo could work, maybe a juvenile crested gecko if you put the tank on it’s side to give more height, a very young bearded dragon could also work, but once again would need to be upgraded fairly quickly so it probably isn’t worth it to start in anything smaller than 20 with them. I would say any turtle or tortoise is probably a no go as they’re quite active and some can get pretty big. Those are just some of the more common reptiles you can easily find, I would say you’re rather limited if you’re not interested in spending much or upgrading later on. Keep in mind that some reptiles require heat lamps and UVB lights that need to be replaced every 6-12 months and that can get quite pricey.
     
  5. scarface

    scarfaceFishlore VIPMember

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    A leopard or Pacman can definitely work. Kept mine in a 20g long, then had to downgrade to a 10g. Maybe not ideal, but not bad either. And Pacman frogs hardly move at all. A 10g is fine. They're much better options than a corn or kingsnake, and not sure why you'd even suggest juvenile ball pythons and bearded dragons.
     
  6. bettaf1sh 7789

    bettaf1sh 7789Valued MemberMember

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    Because both my juvenile ball python and beardie lived in 10 gallon tanks before being upgraded o_O I’m not really sure why you’d openly admit keeping your animals in conditions that you know are “maybe not ideal”. I don’t think anything that you or I has suggested can permanently live in a 10 gallon tank, not only because of the lack of space, but because it’s pretty hard to create a heat gradient in something so small (hence the reason why my ball python now lives in something 75 gallon sized, and the baby beardie is in a 20 long). Personally, I think that maybe a reptile isn’t the best option for OP, if they’re limited to a small tank and small budget. I just wound up with a baby beardie and I’ve had him for less than 2 weeks and the setup and vet bills have costed me roughly $500.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2019
  7. scarface

    scarfaceFishlore VIPMember

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    No need to get hostile. Relax. Breathe. Then reread the OP's original question.

    We'll have to agree to disagree, as I am done here.

    If she has any more questions or wants any elaboration on what I've suggested, she is welcome to send me a PM. I don't mind at all.
     
  8. bettaf1sh 7789

    bettaf1sh 7789Valued MemberMember

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    Not getting hostile, just confused as to why you’d make negative comments about my suggestions while admitting that yours are “less than ideal”… I don’t like the term “agree to disagree” it doesn’t give you much room to learn and understand other people’s perspectives, but some people are set in their ways and don’t want to expand their knowledge on a subject, fine by me. OP is also welcome to PM me as well, I can expand on why tanks are not ideal and give some tips for success if you do plan to use one. My goal is to give advice that will set people and pets up for success, and if I see advice being given that will result in failure, I’m gonna point it out;)
     
  9. skar

    skarWell Known MemberMember

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    Pacman frog or leopard gecko could work.
    Knob tailed gecko or fat tailed gecko would work as well.
    I really like leopard geckos but I haven't had good luck with them.
    You could also do a terrestrial Tarantula or forest scorpion.

    Good luck
     
  10. Mcasella

    McasellaFishlore VIPMember

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    Dwarf african frogs would be a good single species creature for a ten gallon. Not a lot to them as far as care and feeding (meatier diet, make sure to get dwarf and not clawed as the clawed frogs get massive).

    Tree frogs also come to mind, they generally aren't moving around the enclosure that much and look fairly interesting (or if you have them in your pond can be quite annoying but adorable when you are confronted by a dime sized froglet that still has a tail but is hopping and moving outside of water for longer periods). Don't house two males together.

    Pacman as a juvenile definitely, but as they get bigger a larger foot print would be needed for the potato that is half mouth. They don't move a lot but space to move would be important. Single frog only.

    Arrow frogs would be an interesting one, another not good to handle (the oils on hands can actually harm them, so handle only with gloves and rarely), they are a beautiful colored amphibian that isn't too needy (does need fairly small food like flightless fruit flies) but they are not poisonous unless fed a wild type diet (which is where their poison comes from, a domesticated diet prevents them from producing poison). They come in a lot of neat color patterns, they can be a little more expensive per each but can be housed multiples to a single enclosure.

    Fire belly toads, they need land and water. They can be housed multiples to an enclosure, expect babies if you do. They are easy and neat looking with an intense red belly and nice green and dark markings on the rest of the body.

    Most reptiles I wouldn't start in a ten as some just grow way too fast. As well as some of them needing a meatier (more expensive most times) diet than amphibians.
     
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