Removing nerite snail eggs from driftwood?

aqua14

I used to have about three nerite snails in my tank, It was just for cleaning up since it was an early tank and I had lots of algae. So the snails removed some of it. I recently have been adding lots of plants keeping the algae down a bit. Although I have this weird brown algae stuff on my glass that won't stop growing even after I scrape it off. It seems to be right above the gravel and grows with weird formations. I added otocinclus and SAE's to clean my hair algae and didn't do anything to help on the glass.

Anyways I'm replacing and removing some of my driftwood to make some space and making my tank look a bit better. I'm switching a piece of driftwood from my 16 gallon to my 75. They both have white snail eggs. So what's the easiest way to remove them?

Thanks for the Help!
 

Virt

Boil the wood for a couple of minutes but you will obviously have to let it cool off and be aware that it will also kill any beneficial bacteria living in it, though I highly doubt it will affect the cycle in a 75g.
 

Aquarist

Good morning,

I have moved your thread from Cleaning and Maintenance to Freshwater Invertebrates/Snails section of the forum.

Thanks!

Ken
 

aqua14

Boil the wood for a couple of minutes but you will obviously have to let it cool off and be aware that it will also kill any beneficial bacteria living in it, though I highly doubt it will affect the cycle in a 75g.

So when I boil the wood the white snail eggs will just die off?
I also have some green spore algae on there. But after I boil it, should the snail eggs just fall off?

Thanks
 

Virt

Having never done it myself and after a little google bashing, the eggs seem to be fairly resilient, boiling 'should' kill the eggs but it seems they will dissolve after a couple of months if just left alone, the eggs apparently have a very low hatch rate in fresh water, IMO, I would just leave them be and they will go away in their own in time, possibly becoming a snack for your fish
 

fishdaddy725

The eggs usually don't hatch and if they do the fry don't survive. Even if they do hatch it leaves a kind of residue that never seems to go away. I just took a sharp steak knife to it. You are going to take off a small amout of wood too, but not enough to notice. I dried out the wood completely and then resoaked for an hour to try and reduce the depth of damage. I don't recommend this if the wood is going back in the tank with the snails because repetition of this process would probably damage the wood. Plus, it's really annoying.
 
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