Question Releasing Tree Frogs

Goose61

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I was wondering at wait stage does one release Tree Frogs back into the wild?

As everyone here is no doubt aware, I've been raising about three dozen Gray Tree Frogs from eggs I found floating in my Mother's swimming pool five weeks ago. In the past few days several have sprouted front limbs, in which case I moved them to a tank with a basking area for them to haul them out of.

Today, I was looking over that tank, and noticed one missing. Turns out, that it had crawled out of the water and was resting on the upper rim of the tank. Overnight it had turned green, and half of its tail gone.

Thus my next question, at what point can I release them out into the wild (as I hadn't planned on keeping them). Do I wait and give them more time to completely absorb their tails, or as in the case of this one particular frog (even though he still has a small portion of his tail), is he good to go? I'm guessing that since he tried to crawl out of the tank completely, he may be ready to move on, but I wanted to make sure not rush him in case he needed some more time to rest and complete his metamorphosis. I also don't want to keep him too long, and needlessly burn off his energy reserves he'll need to survive while learning to hunt.

Also, any special instructions on releasing them? I'm assuming that all I need to do is release them into the trees, as they no longer have any need (at this moment) for water (or proximity to it).

One thing's for sure - It's a good thing I put the screen cover on the aquarium last night, or no telling where this little fellow would be now.
 

Demeter

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If possible, perhaps move then all outdoors in a shady spot. That way they can leave when they’re ready.

I raised a huge batch in a kiddy pool one summer. They left once their tails had been absorbed. I saw tiny frogs all over the place after that.
 
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Goose61

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Thought about that, but the temps here are in the low 100's, with heat index upwards of 110. So, unfortunately, they would boil to death in the container that they're in.

The little one in question worked his was back down to the basking area this morning, but has now worked his way back up to the top again. Tail still hasn't been completely resorbed, but he seems anxious to get on his way.
 

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