Reducing aquarium temperatures (sans chiller)

Joshaeus

Hi everyone! I was wondering...aside from buying a several hundred dollar aquarium chiller, what are some ways to reduce the temperature of an aquarium by several degrees? I was wondering whether there was any reliable way to push a tank into the 50's when the room temperature was in the low to mid 60's (so a 5-10 degree fahrenheit drop)...this would be to overwinter fishes that need a cool down to spawn (such as some North American natives) or which benefit from a cool down in winter (probably the bulk of subtropical and temperate fishes). The only way I've come up with is evaporative cooking via a fan (coincidentally, would insulating the tank improve the cooling effects imparted by fans or other cooling methods?). Thanks
 

Ghelfaire

How big is the tank? I don't think a 5f-10f drop would make a huge difference, they are probably fine without it but correct me if I'm wrong.
 
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Joshaeus

How big is the tank? I don't think a 5f-10f drop would make a huge difference, they are probably fine without it but correct me if I'm wrong.
None of my tanks are larger than a 10 gallon. This isn't a big deal for tropicals, but a winter temperature drop can extend the lifespan of subtropical and temperate fishes, and some fish (such as many north american darters and sunfish) require a cool winter period to get them into spawning condition.
 
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Ghelfaire

Ok, try freezing a bottle of water and putting it in the tank. Should be enough to cool something like a 10g down.
(Thanks for the info)
 
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Wrench

Turn the heater off?.
They make those as seen on t.v a.c units the artic cube thing. I have one it can cool off my 55 gallon 2°F just have to get it above the tank an point the vents down. Also a fan across the top of the water, frozen water bottle as said before.
I've seen people make a duct from an open window to the top of the tank as well.
 
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tnrsmomma

I would try a fan first, as that seems like the cheapest and easiest option. Air blowing across the surface of the water can make a surprisingly large difference in the temperature. Of course it will also cool down the room a bit and anyone sitting nearby. Experiment with a desk or clip on fan blowing at different angles across the top. Of course if your fish are jumpers you might need to get on of those wire mesh reptile lids, to keep them from jumping out but still allow air flow.
 
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Nickguy5467

I would try a fan first, as that seems like the cheapest and easiest option. Air blowing across the surface of the water can make a surprisingly large difference in the temperature. Of course it will also cool down the room a bit and anyone sitting nearby. Experiment with a desk or clip on fan blowing at different angles across the top. Of course if your fish are jumpers you might need to get on of those wire mesh reptile lids, to keep them from jumping out but still allow air flow.
egg crate sheets work too
 
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Joshaeus

I came up with an idea...why not exploit the fact I live in New England? I am thinking I could put a pair of fish in a water garden outside in October, November, and maybe early December, and then pulling them inside to a spawning tank. The water garden would have a titanium heater plugged into an inkbird controller set to 40 fahrenheit (to prevent the water garden from freezing...most native american fishes that need a chilling period to spawn have no issue handling such a temperature); if the fish being chilled were highly sensitive to low oxygen levels, I would also include a powerhead. How does this sound?
 
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