Red lights

Cheesecake

Hi all!
Today, I found a string red lights around my house and was wondering if those would be beneficial to the plants in my 29g? MacZ?
Plants:
  • Crypt wentii
  • Crypt parva
  • S. Repens
  • Java Fern
  • Java Moss
  • Amazon Sword
  • Anubias Nana Petite
  • Dwarf Sag
  • Amazon Frogbit
  • Anacharis
Thanks!

I think it would be. Red light can help plants flower (varies from species to species). It is also good for young plants (helps with growth).
However, red light can be weak in water. Any results might not be as dramatic as you want.
 
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AcornTheBetta

I think it would be. Red light can help plants flower (varies from species to species). It is also good for young plants (helps with growth).
However, red light can be weak in water. Any results might not be as dramatic as you want.
Ok. I guess it's worth a shot.
 
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ForceTen

What color is bad for plants? Algae in particular.
 
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John58ford

Reds and blues are the key to artificial low power plant lighting. (Assuming all lights have similar outputs) The magic ratio if using plain red sems to be 3 red to each blue. If you run crimson and uv pink one of each to a blue, and if you run all three reds, true red, uv pink, and crimson it's finally beneficial to add one green and one blue per set. Assuming this is a simple array like I build (all the colors are powered together, not color/intensity adjustable like a fluval). I actually still have several sets of crimson I've been meaning to add to my arrays as I have a little too much blue/green.


On the algae note.
Despite my blue and green lights running brighter than expected; The algae in my tanks is negligible but I credit that entirely to extreme management of nutrient through testing and water change, as well as knowing 100% what I dump (or choose not to) in my tanks is being used up. I don't use a generic fertilizer that may cause excess of any one type of nutrient. I am currently testing my own blend of macros outside the tank to supplement the health of the fish as my plants, without fertilizer, are currently running me out of calcium, magnesium and potassium faster than I can change water. The colors of light can help a plant more at different stages of life. I have heard/read that blues are more beneficial to plants in the beginning toner stages and that you can increase your red as more leaf appears and to encourage out of season blooms if you have flowering plants. I have also read that blue actinic lights intended for salt water use can encourage or cause freshwater algae blooms. None the less, all things need light, and nutrients, if you get a little off with one, finely control the other. Ultimately control both and the results will show.
 
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jake37

I control my algae with guppies. Guppies fix all issues esp algae.
 
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jake37

No really i do - here. 18 months and no algae. This would be an algae mess without guppies !


.jpg

Of course you do.
 
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StarGirl

I don't think the christmas lights will be bright enough to go all the way to the bottom. It may look pretty cool though! How were you thinking of setting them up?
 
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RayClem

Are the lights incandescent or LED? If they are the older incandescent lights, I doubt they are sufficiently bright to do much for your tank. If they are red LEDs (and not white LEDs with a red coating or globe over them), they them might be bright enough to be useful. LED aquarium lights also have a reflector that insures that light produced by the bulb is directed into the aquarium. Without such as reflector, most of the light will be wasted.
 
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DoubleDutch

Reds and blues are the key to artificial low power plant lighting. (Assuming all lights have similar outputs) The magic ratio if using plain red sems to be 3 red to each blue. If you run crimson and uv pink one of each to a blue, and if you run all three reds, true red, uv pink, and crimson it's finally beneficial to add one green and one blue per set. Assuming this is a simple array like I build (all the colors are powered together, not color/intensity adjustable like a fluval). I actually still have several sets of crimson I've been meaning to add to my arrays as I have a little too much blue/green.


On the algae note.
Despite my blue and green lights running brighter than expected; The algae in my tanks is negligible but I credit that entirely to extreme management of nutrient through testing and water change, as well as knowing 100% what I dump (or choose not to) in my tanks is being used up. I don't use a generic fertilizer that may cause excess of any one type of nutrient. I am currently testing my own blend of macros outside the tank to supplement the health of the fish as my plants, without fertilizer, are currently running me out of calcium, magnesium and potassium faster than I can change water. The colors of light can help a plant more at different stages of life. I have heard/read that blues are more beneficial to plants in the beginning toner stages and that you can increase your red as more leaf appears and to encourage out of season blooms if you have flowering plants. I have also read that blue actinic lights intended for salt water use can encourage or cause freshwater algae blooms. None the less, all things need light, and nutrients, if you get a little off with one, finely control the other. Ultimately control both and the results will show.

I like to add that in what we see as white light also red and blue are in the spectrum..
The actanic blue lacks the red part to me.


So what we see is different than the plants get.
 
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ForceTen

No really i do - here. 18 months and no algae. This would be an algae mess without guppies !


****.jpg

I see algae on your back glass and that means you have cleaned the rest. Front and sides. Everyone has some. How much depends on lots of variables.
Algae on glass is Mostly all I have. Just a tiny bit on scape.

So now I know why I have some algae. I only run the white and blue with my fixture.
Any recommendations on using the other colors?
I have the Fluval Sea 3.0 Fixture I think. TIA
John
 
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AcornTheBetta

I don't think the christmas lights will be bright enough to go all the way to the bottom. It may look pretty cool though! How were you thinking of setting them up?
They aren't Christmas lights. They are lights that are meant to go on your bike tires and I have 2 sets of them. I was thinking of just attaching them to the light frame.
Are the lights incandescent or LED? If they are the older incandescent lights, I doubt they are sufficiently bright to do much for your tank. If they are red LEDs (and not white LEDs with a red coating or globe over them), they them might be bright enough to be useful. LED aquarium lights also have a reflector that insures that light produced by the bulb is directed into the aquarium. Without such as reflector, most of the light will be wasted.
LED I think.
 
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StarGirl

They aren't Christmas lights. They are lights that are meant to go on your bike tires and I have 2 sets of them. I was thinking of just attaching them to the light frame.

LED I think.
Well you said a strand of lights......lol
 
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AcornTheBetta

Well you said a strand of lights......lol
Yeah it a strand that you put on your bike tires...
 
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jake37

But that is my point. I have not cleaned any algae off of this tank since month 2. For the past 16 or so months no cleaning of algae - i do water changes - and let the guppies and swordtails eat the algae. Live bearers will eat a lot of algae if you don't over feed them. I have a fluval plant 3.0 on this tank - i'm looking into something brighter. My 120 with no guppies as well as the partner 29 next to this tank - again with no guppies - both have more alge and bba (the guppy tank has not had the usual bba i find in other tanks - i haven't quite figured out why - something about the guppies keep everything balanced

I see algae on your back glass and that means you have cleaned the rest. Front and sides. Everyone has some. How much depends on lots of variables.
Algae on glass is Mostly all I have. Just a tiny bit on scape.

So now I know why I have some algae. I only run the white and blue with my fixture.
Any recommendations on using the other colors?
I have the Fluval Sea 3.0 Fixture I think. TIA
John
 
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-Mak-

@OP there is no way of telling exactly how effective your lights will be without a PAR meter. A lot of lights are quite poor for plants, and red travels weakly in water.

What color is bad for plants? Algae in particular.
None. Blue light does not cause algae and it is extremely important for photosynthesis in both plants and algae.
 
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AcornTheBetta

@OP there is no way of telling exactly how effective your lights will be without a PAR meter. A lot of lights are quite poor for plants, and red travels weakly in water.


None. Blue light does not cause algae and it is extremely important for photosynthesis in both plants and algae.
Ok. Good to know. I guess I can't hurt to try...
 
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jake37

Well technically it could hurt but perhaps that is another matter


Ok. Good to know. I guess I can't hurt to try...
 
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ForceTen

None. Blue light does not cause algae and it is extremely important for photosynthesis in both plants and algae.

So it does prevent algae. Or at least help with algae. I don't have any live plants and I don't want algae. I will cut way back on blue or not use it at all.

I am trying to control natural occurring algae with photo period and LED colors. Of course along with regular maintenance and weekly water changes.
I have a Fluval Sea fixture with freshwater and can choose what colors to use. My question was which color or colors not to use to assist me with unwanted algae control.
 
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-Mak-

So it does prevent algae. Or at least help with algae. I don't have any live plants and I don't want algae. I will cut way back on blue or not use it at all.

I am trying to control natural occurring algae with photo period and LED colors. Of course along with regular maintenance and weekly water changes.
I have a Fluval Sea fixture with freshwater and can choose what colors to use. My question was which color or colors not to use to assist me with unwanted algae control.
Well, all light will grow algae no matter what. If you're cutting back on blue you might as well cut back on red and white and other colors. Chlorophyll a and b absorb light maximally at blue and red wavelengths. White light contains all wavelengths. Therefore unless you want to only use yellow and green light (which is still used in photosynthesis to a degree) there is no point IMO. Algae will even use ambient room light if you don't have an artificial light.
 
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raptor22

I control my algae with guppies. Guppies fix all issues esp algae.
I will reveal my secret algae eater in my next video
 
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AcornTheBetta

I will reveal my secret algae eater in my next video
You have a youtube channel?
 
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