Red Cherry Shrimp Sexing?!?

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hoangjohnnguyen

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I have 10 shrimp and they are all dark dark red that's the only kinds the LFS had and they said normally the males have lighter red but they all look the same to me. Any way you can sex them better?
 

Katie13

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Sounds like RCS. Can you post a pic of them?
 
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hoangjohnnguyen

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Katie13

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I see what looks like possibly 3 males at least, but I don’t keep them currently.
 
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hoangjohnnguyen

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Katie13 said:
I see what looks like possibly 3 males at least, but I don’t keep them currently.
Thank you for trying to sex them if you want more closer pictures I can try and get some but I had them for 1 month and they still haven't bred:/
 

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Mcasella

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Females can have darker color, but this is not always a good marker as many color types have equally strong color. Female are generally larger than the males by a little bit, they have a rounded abdomen which is to protect the eggs - when a female molts the males will swim around the tank like crazy trying to find her. Males have a sleeker profile, they do not carry eggs so compared to females they are not round, their abdomens are smoother and do not protrude from their bodies like females.
 
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hoangjohnnguyen

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Mcasella said:
Females can have darker color, but this is not always a good marker as many color types have equally strong color. Female are generally larger than the males by a little bit, they have a rounded abdomen which is to protect the eggs - when a female molts the males will swim around the tank like crazy trying to find her. Males have a sleeker profile, they do not carry eggs so compared to females they are not round, their abdomens are smoother and do not protrude from their bodies like females.
Thank you! That was well explained and broken down!
 

Paradise fish

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Shrimp Sexing,
Color, size, and saddles are useless when trying to determine young shrimp or all female adult shrimp.

It is true that female shrimp have better colors, but there are male shrimp which are as good as the best female especially with the higher qualities. Also, the shrimp offsprings are graded by the father shrimp, not the mother. So if you get shrimplets from a fire red male and a painted fire red female, your shrimplets are only fire red grade. Therefore, if you see a male shrimp with colors that can be mistaken as a female, get it!

Saddles are a sure way to know that it's a female, but young female shrimp don't develope them. Also, female shrimp may not even produce saddles if there are no sexually mature males around. Also, female shrimp who's just hatched her eggs many times don't have a saddle for some time.

The best way I found to sex them is literally spotting their sexual organ. With this method you can sex a shrimp as small as only 1/2", sometimes smaller, with 90% accuracy. No fancy equipment, just a good view of the shrimp from the side and a good eye for shrimp's junk :'D
IMG_2858.JPG

Here's a shrimp only 3/4". Look at the under side of its tail. From body to the tip of the tail (so in this picture right to left), it curves downwards and lays more horizontally. This is a female. But also notice that she doesn't show any saddle because of the sheer intensity of her color.

IMG_2930.JPG

Here's another shrimp also 3/4". Notice that the underside of the tail, again from body (right to left again), curves upwards in almost a concave shape and also, the line doesn't point horizontal but upwards.

IMG_2882.JPG

Here's another shrimp from a profile view and check out its underside of the tail. Notice that (this time from left to right) the line goes upwards. So it's a male. But also notice that from the tip to the body (right to left), the swimmerets (paddle like legs under the tail) ends with a triangular point. As if the shrimp hasn't folded its swimmerets all the way. That point is the sign of a male sexual organ.

You can also see this point on the male in the second picture, but harder.
 
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hoangjohnnguyen

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Shrimp Sexing,
Color, size, and saddles are useless when trying to determine young shrimp or all female adult shrimp.

It is true that female shrimp have better colors, but there are male shrimp which are as good as the best female especially with the higher qualities. Also, the shrimp offsprings are graded by the father shrimp, not the mother. So if you get shrimplets from a fire red male and a painted fire red female, your shrimplets are only fire red grade. Therefore, if you see a male shrimp with colors that can be mistaken as a female, get it!

Saddles are a sure way to know that it's a female, but young female shrimp don't develope them. Also, female shrimp may not even produce saddles if there are no sexually mature males around. Also, female shrimp who's just hatched her eggs many times don't have a saddle for some time.

The best way I found to sex them is literally spotting their sexual organ. With this method you can sex a shrimp as small as only 1/2", sometimes smaller, with 90% accuracy. No fancy equipment, just a good view of the shrimp from the side and a good eye for shrimp's junk :'D
View attachment 381770
Here's a shrimp only 3/4". Look at the under side of its tail. From body to the tip of the tail (so in this picture right to left), it curves downwards and lays more horizontally. This is a female. But also notice that she doesn't show any saddle because of the sheer intensity of her color.

View attachment 381775
Here's another shrimp also 3/4". Notice that the underside of the tail, again from body (right to left again), curves upwards in almost a concave shape and also, the line doesn't point horizontal but upwards.

View attachment 381771
Here's another shrimp from a profile view and check out its underside of the tail. Notice that (this time from left to right) the line goes upwards. So it's a male. But also notice that from the tip to the body (right to left), the swimmerets (paddle like legs under the tail) ends with a triangular point. As if the shrimp hasn't folded its swimmerets all the way. That point is the sign of a male sexual organ.

You can also see this point on the male in the second picture, but harder.
Those are awesome! How do you get them to breed some seem to have no problems with it while others struggle to even keep them alive!
 
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