RayClem new to forum, not to hobby

RayClem

Member
My forum name is RayClem. Although this is the first time I have every joined a fishkeeping forum, I am a long time aquarist. I was only ten when I set up my first aquarium. I have had at least one aquarium running for the past 60 years. When I way young, my tanks were primarily 5-10 gallon, although I often had several of them. I had a pink convict chiclid that survived my college years with feeding by my grandmother.

Once I graduated college, got a job and rented an apartment of my own, I graduated to 20 and 29 gallon tanks. My largest freshwater tank over the coming years was a 90 gallon community tank.

About 20 years ago, I tried my had at reefkeeping and had three separate systems. One was a 55 gallon tank combined with a 29 gallon tank plus sump. I kept a variety of fish, corals and anemones and other invertibrates. This system also had a refugium. I had a 125 gallon tank plus sump that housed larger, aggressive species. Then I had another system that combined a 40 gallon breeder tank, a 20 gallon tank and a sump. That tank had very high lighting and was capable of housing corals and clams with high lighting requirements.

As I got older, the saltwater systems were too labor intensive, so I started to downsize. All of those systems are now history. However, I have now repurposed some of the equipment to establish several freshwater systems.
1. The 55 gallon tank is now a heavily planted, moderately stocked community aquarium. It has moderately high lighting, a UV sterilizer, pressurized CO2 injection and daily fertilizer addition. This system relies on the experience I gained with reef aquariums. The cleanup crew consists of corydoras, a rubbernose pleco, some ottos, and various snails.
2. I set up a divided 10 gallon tank for two male bettas for my wife's enjoyment. One is a bumblebee male and the other is a dual tail red male. We named them after the Biblical brothers Jacob and Esau who were forever quarreling. The name Esau means "red" so it was an appropriate name for the red male.
3. I have a 20 gallon high which is currently stocked with some bloodfin tetras and some fancy guppies. The cleanup crew consists of snails, ottos and a bristlenose plecco.
4. I have a 20 gallon breeder tank which may be used for breeding platties and or guppies. The tank is cycled and contains minimal livestock to keep the nitrogen cycle going. I can also use it as a quarantine tank.
5. I have a 29 gallon tank which houses a lone common pleco that I have since it was quite small. It now is well over a foot long. It was once quite suitable for the 90 gallon tank, but it would devastate my 55 gallon planted tank.
6. I no longer have my 90 gallon tank, that was donated to a neighbor. The 40 gallon breeder and 125 gallon tanks sit empty until such time as I decide if I want to activate them.

I still have some "old school" ideas such as the use of undergravel filters to enhance biological filtration. However, I am also trying to learn new concepts. I have never used a UV sterilizer before. Neither have I used CO2 injection. I have used combination fertilizers such as root tabs, but this is the first time I have tried to add nutrients such a nitrogen and potassium based on plant demand. Thus, I am here both to learn from the experience of others as well as to share from my 60 years of experience in the hobby.
 

ree913

Member
RayClem said:
My forum name is RayClem. Although this is the first time I have every joined a fishkeeping forum, I am a long time aquarist. I was only ten when I set up my first aquarium. I have had at least one aquarium running for the past 60 years. When I way young, my tanks were primarily 5-10 gallon, although I often had several of them. I had a pink convict chiclid that survived my college years with feeding by my grandmother.

Once I graduated college, got a job and rented an apartment of my own, I graduated to 20 and 29 gallon tanks. My largest freshwater tank over the coming years was a 90 gallon community tank.

About 20 years ago, I tried my had at reefkeeping and had three separate systems. One was a 55 gallon tank combined with a 29 gallon tank plus sump. I kept a variety of fish, corals and anemones and other invertibrates. This system also had a refugium. I had a 125 gallon tank plus sump that housed larger, aggressive species. Then I had another system that combined a 40 gallon breeder tank, a 20 gallon tank and a sump. That tank had very high lighting and was capable of housing corals and clams with high lighting requirements.

As I got older, the saltwater systems were too labor intensive, so I started to downsize. All of those systems are now history. However, I have now repurposed some of the equipment to establish several freshwater systems.
1. The 55 gallon tank is now a heavily planted, moderately stocked community aquarium. It has moderately high lighting, a UV sterilizer, pressurized CO2 injection and daily fertilizer addition. This system relies on the experience I gained with reef aquariums. The cleanup crew consists of corydoras, a rubbernose pleco, some ottos, and various snails.
2. I set up a divided 10 gallon tank for two male bettas for my wife's enjoyment. One is a bumblebee male and the other is a dual tail red male. We named them after the Biblical brothers Jacob and Esau who were forever quarreling. The name Esau means "red" so it was an appropriate name for the red male.
3. I have a 20 gallon high which is currently stocked with some bloodfin tetras and some fancy guppies. The cleanup crew consists of snails, ottos and a bristlenose plecco.
4. I have a 20 gallon breeder tank which may be used for breeding platties and or guppies. The tank is cycled and contains minimal livestock to keep the nitrogen cycle going. I can also use it as a quarantine tank.
5. I have a 29 gallon tank which houses a lone common pleco that I have since it was quite small. It now is well over a foot long. It was once quite suitable for the 90 gallon tank, but it would devastate my 55 gallon planted tank.
6. I no longer have my 90 gallon tank, that was donated to a neighbor. The 40 gallon breeder and 125 gallon tanks sit empty until such time as I decide if I want to activate them.

I still have some "old school" ideas such as the use of undergravel filters to enhance biological filtration. However, I am also trying to learn new concepts. I have never used a UV sterilizer before. Neither have I used CO2 injection. I have used combination fertilizers such as root tabs, but this is the first time I have tried to add nutrients such a nitrogen and potassium based on plant demand. Thus, I am here both to learn from the experience of others as well as to share from my 60 years of experience in the hobby.
Welcome to Fishlore! I have a 20 gallon Betta sorority tank. I also had a couple of tanks a long time ago, and now I feel like a beginner again . So much has changed. Anyway, I think you'll enjoy this site. I've learned a lot
 

mang0

Member
welcome! your tanks sound really nice :)
 

jkkgron2

Member
Welcome to fishlore!! Can you post some pics??
 

Dawn Michele

Member
Welcome to Fishlore Ray!!!
 

MomeWrath

Member
Welcome! I second the request for photos! There are a few of us that have been to the salty side and returned. My avatar is a pic of a starry blenny I had in a little reef I kept going for a few years, moving from a 26 to a 30 to a 90 then back to a 29 and finally to a 75 before switching back to freshwater. Too labor intensive is right! Looking forward to seeing you "around" :)
 

Koneko

Member
Hello and welcome!
 
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