Random L200 Death

Discussion in 'Freshwater Beginners' started by Dfbacca, Apr 15, 2017.

  1. D

    Dfbacca Valued Member Member

    My L200 green phantom pleco randomly died today...I had him/her for about a month with everything going fine. Today was water change day, levels tested as follows:
    Ammonia: 0ppm
    NitrIte: 0ppm
    NitrAte: ~40ppm
    Afterwards, I completed my weekly 50% WC (although I did a little more today since the NitrAtes were a bit higher)
    The pleco was alive and well throughout the WC. Now, a few hours later, I find it dead in the corner of the tank, with the back half of it's body pale. It was housed with mbuna (yellow labs, acei, socolofi) in a 55g tank, with driftwood and lights on 8-10 hours a day. Also, algea tablets were added 3-4 times a week after lights out. Any reason for this death IMG_20170415_160021.jpg IMG_20170415_160038.jpg ? I've included pictures after I noticed the death and removed from the tank. Thanks in advance...
     
  2. slayer5590

    slayer5590 Well Known Member Member

    Looks like it hadn't been eating to me. The belly looks sunken in.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    D

    Dfbacca Valued Member Member

    I wonder why? I was making sure it was getting food...
     




  4. emerald6

    emerald6 Valued Member Member

    Sorry for your loss.

    I don't think plecos should be (from my experience) housed with mbunas. EVER. I tried doing that once and the poor thing lost an eye. I think the mbunas either attacked the pleco or otherwise stressed it out with their high activity levels. If you are like most other mbuna keepers and you do a slight overstock, that would probably keep the pleco on its toes 24/7, allowing for diseases to easily attack it. Plecos do find with American cichlids, I think that has more to do with how these fish behave. African cichlids live like city folk-very active with no time to stop for pedestrians. Americans act more like country people, more relaxed (but potentially still belligerent towards outsiders).

    By the way, what exactly is your tank stocked with?
     
  5. OP
    OP
    D

    Dfbacca Valued Member Member

    I did so much research before buying my L200 and everything said plecos are one of the only species able to survive with mbuna :(:( I guess everything has its exceptions...But I do see your point...Mbuna are always active and dashing around the tank, probably stressed the pleco out too much. I have 6 electric yellow labs, 5 yellow-tail acei, and 5 socolofi. (i will adjust them once they are sexually mature and able to get a good ratio)
     
  6. AvalancheDave

    AvalancheDave Well Known Member Member

    I assume pH wasn't low? What chemicals, if any, were you using?
     
  7. OP
    OP
    D

    Dfbacca Valued Member Member

  8. AvalancheDave

    AvalancheDave Well Known Member Member

    Wait, I misread the first time. I thought the WC was after the pleco died rather than right before. That makes me suspect the water change. It could have been insufficient dechlorinator or gas bubble trauma though the latter is obvious with little bubbles everywhere.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    D

    Dfbacca Valued Member Member

    Maybe, but im a little skeptical of that...I add the exact same amount via syringe every time into the python water stream while filling back up.
     
  10. AvalancheDave

    AvalancheDave Well Known Member Member

  11. OP
    OP
    D

    Dfbacca Valued Member Member

    Oh, I've always added enough prime for the entire 55g volume and though that was enough since its what was recommended to me
     
  12. Zahc

    Zahc Well Known Member Member

    I'm going to say it was hungry, as its belly is very concave. If your other fish are all perfectly healthy, that's all I can think of, unless he was bullied/stressed by your Mbuna, which again, would likely lead to starvation.
     
  13. AvalancheDave

    AvalancheDave Well Known Member Member

    It's not that common of a problem but water changes (especially larger ones) can be stressful for a variety of reasons. It may have been too much for a fish that may have had other issues. When a fish dies right after a water change, it's probably not a coincidence.
     




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