Raising Some Fry

abcdefghi

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Within the past 5 days, I have had 2 pairs of angels spawn in my 125G. One of the pairs has been spawning a few weeks now and are slowly improving, the first couple spawns the male would eat the eggs as fast as the female could release them. That pair now works as a team and one fans the eggs, while the other chases off anything else, it is pretty cool to watch them.

The second pair spawned for the first time today and already look like they know what they are doing. No white eggs, one guards the eggs, while the other chases away intruders.

Thankfully, there has not been any real aggression in the tank although I realize that can change (and am already starting to think about what to do with the other 2 angels who are not in a pair).

Overnight, snails and corys are happily eating the eggs, but I would like to try and at least raise a single batch of fry at a time and then sell them locally. Having never tried to raise them before I am trying to determine what size tank I should aim for. Bearing in mind I would want to keep them in this tank until they are large enough to sell, would a 20 long work? Or is that going to be way too small and ideally a 29G or a 40 breeder should be what I am looking for?

Outside of tank size, I believe most other requirements are fairly easy to figure out from reading various threads. Temperature, water change, feeding requirements etc. Anything that may not be that obvious that would be helpful?

Additionally, is there any way to tell what color the fry would end up? All of the adults are silver angelfish, with the typical 3 black solid bars, red eyes and brown shoulder / forehead coloring.

If I can I will try to get some pictures posted of both pairs, I grabbed a few and posted on social media but will also try to post here.

Thanks.
 

phantom

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congrats!!! I believe a 20g long is fine as long as your not raising them all in there to adulthood and only to selling size also I don't know about colors but time will tell!!!
 
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abcdefghi

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Thanks, I have seen suggestions of also using a 40B if there are a lot of fry. I am trying to avoid having to get both a 20L and 40B if I can, I do have a 10G that I could technically use initially then when the fry are large enough move them to a 40B. Would mean having to move shrimp though from the 10G into the 125G (fully realizing they may well end up as fish food).

The new pair are already better parents than the first pair. The batch of eggs from them are still there this morning, I felt for sure the snails and corys would get them overnight.
 

Corrie Williamson

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If you have a 10 gallon that is an ideal size to start the fry in.

A 40 gallon would be better for raising them long term.

I suppose you could always use the 40 gallon with a divider to start with and slowly increase the size of the swimming space as the fry increase in size. However it depends on how many you plan on raising and for how long. If you plan on raising a small number of fry for a short period of time the 40 will work, but the larger the number of fry the more space they will need.
 
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abcdefghi

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At the moment I just have the 10G with a recovering Apisto (can move back to the 125G or be rehomed) and some shrimp. Guessing the shrimp will eat the eggs and likely the fry as well?

I don't plan on raising large numbers, essentially I would just try to raise a single batch at a time. I do realize though that a single batch of eggs could number the 100's assuming an (unlikely) 100% survival rate. I would rather give them more space to grow to a sellable size in the 40G than trying to squeeze them into a 20G though. I do like the idea of a divider and it would be a cheap way to give them room and manageable.

I have some time to think about it, the second pair that spawned lost all their eggs. There were a few left on the 2nd morning, but something got to them, so currently I have no eggs. Typically the original pair spawn on a Friday so I am watching them today to see how they are behaving.
 

Corrie Williamson

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In a 40 gallon you might be able to raise a small portion of the clutch. I typically get clutches of 200 or more eggs from my pair. I remove about 1/3 of the clutch once they are free swimming leaving the patents 2/3s. Last time I ended up with 64 this time I still have too many to count.

I found the following on a website and thought it might be a bit of a help.

The following would be a very general guideline.
  • Nickel size bodies 1 angelfish per gallon
  • Quarter size bodies 1 angelfish per 2 gallons
  • Silver dollar size bodies 1 angelfish per 3 gallons
  • Stock ready to be paired 1 angelfish per 5 gallons
  • Full grown breeding pair 20 gallon tall
The last 2 (stock ready and full grown) in my experience is not nearly enough space, but the first two seem to work ok for growing juvenile angelfish.

Hope this helps. Good luck on the next spawn.
 
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abcdefghi

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One pair spawned again yesterday, not doing anything with the eggs this go around though, but they definitely spawn regularly.

Posted some pictures or both pairs, pic's 1 & 3 are the females, 2 & 4 the males.
 

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Kristin

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Corrie Williamson said:
In a 40 gallon you might be able to raise a small portion of the clutch. I typically get clutches of 200 or more eggs from my pair. I remove about 1/3 of the clutch once they are free swimming leaving the patents 2/3s. Last time I ended up with 64 this time I still have too many to count.
Can you explain more about removing part of the clutch? At what point do you do this?
 

Mcasella

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Kristin said:
Can you explain more about removing part of the clutch? At what point do you do this?
Once they are free swimming or close to it (when the fry are able to swim on their own, if your parent fish do not allow them to get to the stage you have to take them earlier) you can remove a portion of the clutch to raise the amount you feel capable doing (some spawns are larger than even 200 verging on 500, so it makes more sense for a hobbyist to raise only what they can and not overcrowd themselves with fish).
 

Corrie Williamson

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I wait until the clutch is free swimming or close to it. I try to wait until the clutch has been in wigglers stage for 4-5 days. The longer I can leave them with the parents the better, as the survival rate of what I take is higher and the work for me a lot less.

I distract the parents by distracting them with a threat on the side of the tank where the clutch isn't, and use a turkey baster to remove a portion of the clutch. I try to take 1/3 of the clutch which for my pair is between 80-120 depending on the clutch size. The survival rate of what I take will decrease over the next week or so. Unfortunately my breeding pair bicker a lot during the wiggler/free swimming stage and so far none of the spawn left in their care survive.
 
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