Question Rabbits!

julifhy

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My mom’s friends has a rabbit she doesn’t have time to properly take care of and she asked us if I might want to adopt it. Obviously I said yes! I’m not 100% ready to give her away though so it might be a while until I get the rabbit, but I thought I should ask, is there anything I should know before owning a rabbit? What cage is best for rabbits? Should I keep her inside or outside? Is keeping a rabbit similar to keeping a guinea pig? The rabbit is a miniature breed apparently and she’s very social and loves getting held and pet. Any tips on owning a rabbit will be appreciated :D
 

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I kept "miniature" rabbits for a while, there are a lot of rabbit cages on the market (my dad and I built mine though) but make sure when you're looking at cages that the mesh or bars aren't wide enough for its feet it fall through or get stuck in. Whats the climate like where you live in the summer and winter? I kept mine outside in the summer (80-90 degrees) with ice bottles to rest on, and inside in the winter. Make sure they get a lot of exercise or outdoor time even if its sitting with them in the grass while they explore (make sure they can't escape or get too far- I used a rabbit harness and an outdoor pen). You'll need hay/straw for bedding and if its potty trained (poops and pees in the same spot) you'll need a kind of potty tray for ease of cleaning. My rabbits loved alfalfa and yogurt treats and raspberry leaves and dandelion leaves as treats, I don't remember the exact feed we used though. They really like toys too! I've never kept a guinea pig but I think rabbits need more space/ a bigger cage. I know I've probably missed or forgotten some stuff but I hope this helps!
 

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There is tons to know about keeping a rabbit and not something to just jump into.. Please keep in mind that they are a 10-15 year commitment like a dog or a cat, but higher maintenance.
First, start by finding a rabbit-saavy vet in your area. You'll want this before something happens. As prey animals, rabbits hide their symptoms well and it is often an urgent situation once symptoms are noticed. Most vet clinics will do check-ups/treat rabbits, but that doesn't mean they have the knowledge or experience to recognize problems or know which drugs are unsafe for rabbits. Rabbit.org has a great list of screening questions to ask a potential vet.
Rabbits will live much longer, happier lives inside and you will bond more closely and get to enjoy their personalities more this way.
Even a small rabbit needs a much larger cage than what is typically marketed for rabbits to be kept in. We keep our mini-rex in a 4 foot by 6 foot puppy exercise pen when we are asleep or not at home. When we are at home, we typically allow her full run of the house.
Rabbits can be litter trained and this is fairly easy to do once the rabbit has been spayed/neutered, but they do tend to have accidents more as they get older.
Like guinea pigs, rabbits should have access to hay (timothy or similar, not alfalfa) at all times. Alfalfa hay can be given as an occasional treat. Pellets are like a supplement, a small handful (exact amount varies by size and age of rabbit) fed once per day. Fresh vegetables should be fed regularly too, but bunnies have sensitive tummies so vegetables need to be introduced slowly and in small quantities to start. Some bunnies just don't tolerate specific vegetables the same as others. Our bunny for example gets an very upset tummy from green bell pepper, though this isn't a vegetable most bunnies have any problems with. So we of course stopped offering this after figuring it out.
There is so much more. Rabbit.org is a good place to start. I'd be happy answer more questions.. 12 years of bunny experience, but it is just difficult to try to cover eveything in one go..

The next step after tons of research would be bunny-proofing your home. It's a little bit like baby proofing. Probably the most important would be to protect all your cords. Many bunnies like to bite them in half, which can be dangerous. Even though we've kept most of our cords protected with corrugated split tubing (the type commonly used in automotive), we've gone through many cellphone chargers, xbox controllers, and a laptop cable, due to our sweet curious bunnies.
 
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julifhy

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Willj626 said:
I kept "miniature" rabbits for a while, there are a lot of rabbit cages on the market (my dad and I built mine though) but make sure when you're looking at cages that the mesh or bars aren't wide enough for its feet it fall through or get stuck in. Whats the climate like where you live in the summer and winter? I kept mine outside in the summer (80-90 degrees) with ice bottles to rest on, and inside in the winter. Make sure they get a lot of exercise or outdoor time even if its sitting with them in the grass while they explore (make sure they can't escape or get too far- I used a rabbit harness and an outdoor pen). You'll need hay/straw for bedding and if its potty trained (poops and pees in the same spot) you'll need a kind of potty tray for ease of cleaning. My rabbits loved alfalfa and yogurt treats and raspberry leaves and dandelion leaves as treats, I don't remember the exact feed we used though. They really like toys too! I've never kept a guinea pig but I think rabbits need more space/ a bigger cage. I know I've probably missed or forgotten some stuff but I hope this helps!
Ty! My moms friend said she would give us the cage and all the supplies she has to us, but I have no idea how big the cage is, which is why I asked. I’m assuming I’m going to probably have to get a bigger cage, but hopefully not. I think that she said she keeps the rabbit outside, but our backyard is basically a desert after our neighbors cut down all the trees that gave us shade, so I would say the temperature can get up to 90°F and even higher during summer (we also don’t have any grass in our backyard, so that makes it seem even more like a desert lol). We also have raccoons, skunks, and possums that sometimes come into our backyard, so I don’t know how safe our backyard might be. I would also make give her a lot of exercise. I give all my animals as much attention as I possibly can. I also really hope she’s potty trained! If not, I’ll attempt to train her. Any tips on potty training?

Ptera said:
There is tons to know about keeping a rabbit and not something to just jump into.. Please keep in mind that they are a 10-15 year commitment like a dog or a cat, but higher maintenance.
First, start by finding a rabbit-saavy vet in your area. You'll want this before something happens. As prey animals, rabbits hide their symptoms well and it is often an urgent situation once symptoms are noticed. Most vet clinics will do check-ups/treat rabbits, but that doesn't mean they have the knowledge or experience to recognize problems or know which drugs are unsafe for rabbits. Rabbit.org has a great list of screening questions to ask a potential vet.
Rabbits will live much longer, happier lives inside and you will bond more closely and get to enjoy their personalities more this way.
Even a small rabbit needs a much larger cage than what is typically marketed for rabbits to be kept in. We keep our mini-rex in a 4 foot by 6 foot puppy exercise pen when we are asleep or not at home. When we are at home, we typically allow her full run of the house.
Rabbits can be litter trained and this is fairly easy to do once the rabbit has been spayed/neutered, but they do tend to have accidents more as they get older.
Like guinea pigs, rabbits should have access to hay (timothy or similar, not alfalfa) at all times. Alfalfa hay can be given as an occasional treat. Pellets are like a supplement, a small handful (exact amount varies by size and age of rabbit) fed once per day. Fresh vegetables should be fed regularly too, but bunnies have sensitive tummies so vegetables need to be introduced slowly and in small quantities to start. Some bunnies just don't tolerate specific vegetables the same as others. Our bunny for example gets an very upset tummy from green bell pepper, though this isn't a vegetable most bunnies have any problems with. So we of course stopped offering this after figuring it out.
There is so much more. Rabbit.org is a good place to start. I'd be happy answer more questions.. 12 years of bunny experience, but it is just difficult to try to cover eveything in one go..

The next step after tons of research would be bunny-proofing your home. It's a little bit like baby proofing. Probably the most important would be to protect all your cords. Many bunnies like to bite them in half, which can be dangerous. Even though we've kept most of our cords protected with corrugated split tubing (the type commonly used in automotive), we've gone through many cellphone chargers, xbox controllers, and a laptop cable, due to our sweet curious bunnies.
I definitely don’t want to jump into rabbit especially without knowing anything. I did that with my betta and from now on I’m always going to research the animal. I don’t know much about the rabbit yet or it’s medical history, but I will definitely take it to the vet. All I know about the rabbit is that she’s a female, her fur is black, she’s a miniature breed (I don’t know anything about rabbit breeds, that’s just what I was told), and her nails are very long. I used to trim my guinea pig’s nails without any problems. Is there anything I should look out for? I know that since the rabbit is black it could be challenging trimming her nails.
Ty for all the tips about the food! We still have an unopened Timothy hay bag from my guinea pig. Our house is also guinea pig proof, so I think I can say it would also be rabbit proof?

Tysm for all the tips! I’m going to make sure to do a lot of research to make sure I can properly take care of a rabbit. I did have a couple more questions, but I forgot them lol. It’s late where I am currently, so I’ll ask more questions later. Again, ty for all the help!
 
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julifhy

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I’ve decided that I would keep the cage inside in the kitchen. We have enough space there to keep a pretty big cage (I will also take her out daily of course). The temperature in the kitchen is probably the most stable, not too cold and not to hot in the summer, but it does get pretty cold in the winter. Any tips on keeping the rabbit warm during the winter? I’ve also have done research on the noises they make, how to properly handle them, how to set up the cage, and how to trim the rabbit’s nails. I’m going to watch some more videos on rabbit keeping and any more tips would be really helpful. Especially things you wished you would have known before owning a rabbit. I don’t want to be unprepared for something I didn’t realize might happen.
 

Willj626

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julifhy said:
I’ve decided that I would keep the cage inside in the kitchen. We have enough space there to keep a pretty big cage (I will also take her out daily of course). The temperature in the kitchen is probably the most stable, not too cold and not to hot in the summer, but it does get pretty cold in the winter. Any tips on keeping the rabbit warm during the winter? I’ve also have done research on the noises they make, how to properly handle them, how to set up the cage, and how to trim the rabbit’s nails. I’m going to watch some more videos on rabbit keeping and any more tips would be really helpful. Especially things you wished you would have known before owning a rabbit. I don’t want to be unprepared for something I didn’t realize might happen.
Lots of hay and hot water bottles in the winter, I think they sell heating pads but be careful about the chewing with anything electrical.
 
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julifhy

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A little update: My moms friend said we can pick up the rabbit anytime we want. She also sent her a picture and it doesn't look like she has a cage. I also measured the spot in the kitchen where the cage would most likely be and the biggest we probably would be able to get is 40 inches in length and 24 inches in width. I know that's a little small, but I will make sure the rabbit gets plenty exercise outside of her cage. I also think that I'm going to build the cage (with the help of my grandpa) to make it look "furniture like" because I know my mom doesn't really like the way cages look like. Making it furniture like would also convince them to make it a lot bigger than pet store cages. Is building a cage like this expensive? Has anyone done this before? I'm currently drawing my ideas for the cage, so I'll post a picture later.
 

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Many accolades (sincerely) for your first steps towards being a responsible and great rabbit caretaker.
For the most part, the breed of rabbit doesn't make a difference, rabbit behavior varies some individually, it doesn't matter which breed. In general, larger breeds are more tolerant of being picked up and obviously need a bit more space. On the other side of that, there are a few breeds that are more prone to some specific problems. Do you know yet what kind of rabbit it is?
The black nails do make them more difficult to clip since you cannot see the quick inside of the nail. Black nails or not, it is much easier to clip nails with a helper. One person can hold bunny gently, but securely in their lap while the other clips nails. We tried the bunny-burrito method with both our buns and it just didn't work out. Some bunny parents use a flashlight to see the quick in black nails and this can work if you happen to have a second person to hold it (or are quite talented and have a calm bunny), but it can also just be too many hands in a small space where precision is important. It's often easiest to just clip off only about 3mm and (if the nails are still too long after this) in a week to 10 days trim again. This allows the quick time to retreat lower into the nail so that you don't nick it. Plus the faster you can accomplish grooming time, the less stress bunny is put through. Do not trim a dark nail if it looks quite short already (compared to the others), sometimes nails get caught on things and break. Under normal circumstances, nails will only need trimming every 4-6 weeks and sticking to a schedule should prevent them from growing out overly long. If bunny is panic-y and/or tends to struggle more and more throughout having her nails trimmed, go ahead and do just the front or just the back, offer a treat and release for 30 minutes to several hours, so long as you'll remember to get the rest of the nails later in the day. Nail trimming time is also a good time to take care of another important grooming task that many don't know should be done..
You've likely read about rabbits' scent glands under their chin which they will rub on things/people to "claim" them; rabbits also have scent glands on either side of their anus and over time these get build up and need to be cleaned, but it is easy to do. They of course don't like it (and we have been pee'd on during cleaning) but it is significantly better than an infection later. Use a Q-tip dipped in warm water to carefully swab the build-up out. You can find videos that show exactly where and what it looks like. Both male and female rabbits need this done every 4-6 weeks or so. It is very possible that your bun has never had it done, in which case the first time will be the worst of it and after that it'll be very quick and easy (and significantly less smelly).

Unfortunately, I've never taken care of a guinea pig, so I don't what pig-proofing entails.. but I imagine this means that any dangerous small areas have already been blocked off.
Aside from other dangers like cords, poisonous plants (which is most houseplants), and possibly other pets, the rest of bunny-proofing is mostly protecting your stuff which in turn protects them from ingesting things they shouldn't.
How high can guinea pigs jump? How mischievous are they? Bunnies easily jump onto sofas, upholstered chairs, and low beds and then get into EVERYTHING on any nearby tables, especially if there is anything of special interest like food, plants, or favorite chewing items.
Each bunny is different about what types of things they like to chew and destroy. For our male, we'll call him Rabert, his favorites were: thin cords like phone chargers, gaming controller cords, laptop charging cables; the plastic things on the ends of shoe laces; and books (especially hardbacks). For our female, we'll call her Rosie, thin cords again (delicious black spaghetti); ANY unattended human foods (she once ran off holding the stick of a whole corndog); and soft plastic/rubber-y stuff like the buttons on the t.v. remote or the grip-y part of my hairbrush. After 12 years, we are in the habit of setting down all remote controls buttons-down, always.

Indoors, in the kitchen should be plenty warm for a rabbit, even in winter. They handle cold much much better than heat, but avoid drafts no matter season. If she is a very small rabbit, that may be enough space short term, especially if she gets lots of time out of the pen. Minimum size should accommodate her litter box, a shelter to hide inside (this can be a smallish cardboard box with an arched opening cut into it), and a heavy non-plastic water dish (ceramic cat dishes work great), with space left to lay down outside of her box/house and fully stretch out. If she does need some extra warmth, some options are: a fleece blanket inside her shelter (so long as she doesn't decide it's for eating) or a heating pad, but like Willj said, something with a cord isn't safe and anything not chew-proof isn't safe either cause bunnies chew and there are usually harmful chemicals in these things (rice isn't good for bunnies either and they will rip open and eat rice warmers). The "SnuggleSafe" is great. It is a hard plastic, frisbee-looking heating pad that comes with a soft cover, you just pop it in the microwave for a bit and it holds heat for up to 10 hours.

The expense of building a cage is definitely going to depend a lot on the design and the materials used. Keep in mind that it will get chewed so do not use any stains/finishes on wood. Any wood parts need to be a safe wood like pine. Do not use any adhesives, and make sure that no nails/staples go too far through of course.
 

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I was lucky enough to know a lot of the bunny "secrets" from the start. I had a great source of information starting out. We have a local rabbit-only shelter here and the founder of it has been working with bunnies for over 40 years. She has been wonderful.

Something I wish I'd known from the start or rather, something I was very lucky to know from the start, but took awhile to master..
When you get ready to pick up and handle a rabbit; whether it is for cuddles, grooming, bedtime, or safety reasons; bunnies know whether you are confident or nervous and they react to this. If you are very nervous, it can make them nervous too, or not, but either way, they'll take advantage of it and do whatever they can to prevent you from picking them up. Just having confidence about it makes tons of difference, it is crazy. But this of course is tricky, because when you don't have experience, you don't have that confidence. Obviously you don't want to hold too tightly or too loosely since either could hurt the rabbit/allow the rabbit to hurt him/herself. MOST adults don't hold a rabbit firmly enough, because they are delicate/fragile. Hold a rabbit with approximately the firmness you'd hold a cat.
Though rabbits are held differently than guinea pigs, you may have some advantage here, but I'm not sure how adverse guinea pigs are to being picked up or how much this new bun has been handled or how well she tolerates it.
If a rabbit's struggles and protests are successful, and you're noticing this in the moment, don't tighten up your grip too much or grab at them, this can cause panic and injury. Instead, get lower to the ground (or sit down on the sofa/bed if it is close) to eliminate/lessen the drop. You can try again after and you will both get more used to it.
 
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julifhy

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Ptera said:
Many accolades (sincerely) for your first steps towards being a responsible and great rabbit caretaker.
For the most part, the breed of rabbit doesn't make a difference, rabbit behavior varies some individually, it doesn't matter which breed. In general, larger breeds are more tolerant of being picked up and obviously need a bit more space. On the other side of that, there are a few breeds that are more prone to some specific problems. Do you know yet what kind of rabbit it is?
Thank you so much for all this info! I've been watching so many rabbit videos today and reading on how to properly take care of them. Unfortunately, I always get my hopes up way too fast. If it only depended on my mom, she would say yes to the rabbit, but my dad said the rabbit is too big and he doesn't like the color :/
I guess now I need tips on how to convince someone to get a rabbit :facepalm:
I really want to help rehome my mom's friend's rabbit though. She can't properly take care of her and she keeps him in a potable kennel in the garage during the night and in an exercise pen in the backyard during the day. The rabbit seems a little over weight and her nails are very long. I will attach a picture later. I'm also assuming she wasn't spayed or had any vet visits. I don't know the breed, but she has short fur and her ears are perked up. She's so cute though. All black with white outlines around her eyes, ears, and nose :joyful:

Ptera said:
The black nails do make them more difficult to clip since you cannot see the quick inside of the nail. Black nails or not, it is much easier to clip nails with a helper. One person can hold bunny gently, but securely in their lap while the other clips nails. We tried the bunny-burrito method with both our buns and it just didn't work out. Some bunny parents use a flashlight to see the quick in black nails and this can work if you happen to have a second person to hold it (or are quite talented and have a calm bunny), but it can also just be too many hands in a small space where precision is important. It's often easiest to just clip off only about 3mm and (if the nails are still too long after this) in a week to 10 days trim again. This allows the quick time to retreat lower into the nail so that you don't nick it. Plus the faster you can accomplish grooming time, the less stress bunny is put through. Do not trim a dark nail if it looks quite short already (compared to the others), sometimes nails get caught on things and break. Under normal circumstances, nails will only need trimming every 4-6 weeks and sticking to a schedule should prevent them from growing out overly long. If bunny is panic-y and/or tends to struggle more and more throughout having her nails trimmed, go ahead and do just the front or just the back, offer a treat and release for 30 minutes to several hours, so long as you'll remember to get the rest of the nails later in the day. Nail trimming time is also a good time to take care of another important grooming task that many don't know should be done..
You've likely read about rabbits' scent glands under their chin which they will rub on things/people to "claim" them; rabbits also have scent glands on either side of their anus and over time these get build up and need to be cleaned, but it is easy to do. They of course don't like it (and we have been pee'd on during cleaning) but it is significantly better than an infection later. Use a Q-tip dipped in warm water to carefully swab the build-up out. You can find videos that show exactly where and what it looks like. Both male and female rabbits need this done every 4-6 weeks or so. It is very possible that your bun has never had it done, in which case the first time will be the worst of it and after that it'll be very quick and easy (and significantly less smelly).
My guinea pig had 2 white paws and 2 dark brown paws where you couldn't see the quick. She also hated her nails cut, but I managed to cut them by myself or with the help of my mom holding her. With a rabbit, it's most likely going to always be a 2 people job lol. For all 6 years we had my guinea pig I never cut her quick. I feel really proud of that lol and hopefully my streak will continue if I convince my dad to get the rabbit :). I'm always careful with cutting nails. The flashlight trick didn't work for my guinea pig though, but I will try it again if I have to.
Also thanks for telling me about the scent glad. I knew they had it, but didn't know I had to clean it.

Ptera said:
Unfortunately, I've never taken care of a guinea pig, so I don't what pig-proofing entails.. but I imagine this means that any dangerous small areas have already been blocked off.
Aside from other dangers like cords, poisonous plants (which is most houseplants), and possibly other pets, the rest of bunny-proofing is mostly protecting your stuff which in turn protects them from ingesting things they shouldn't.
How high can guinea pigs jump? How mischievous are they? Bunnies easily jump onto sofas, upholstered chairs, and low beds and then get into EVERYTHING on any nearby tables, especially if there is anything of special interest like food, plants, or favorite chewing items.
Our guinea pig proofing included hiding and blocking off cables, small spaces where we couldn't see her and keeping a close eye on her. We actually didn't have to do much with our guinea pig. She was so trust worthy, we never closed her cage unless we would be gone for a couple of days and she never ever left her cage. We don't have any house plants on the floor, only on high shelves. I think guinea pigs can jump 6 inches? Maybe 12?

Thank you so much for all this info. Sorry if I missed somethings. I'm definitely going to look back at this response :)

Ptera said:
I was lucky enough to know a lot of the bunny "secrets" from the start. I had a great source of information starting out. We have a local rabbit-only shelter here and the founder of it has been working with bunnies for over 40 years. She has been wonderful.

Something I wish I'd known from the start or rather, something I was very lucky to know from the start, but took awhile to master..
When you get ready to pick up and handle a rabbit; whether it is for cuddles, grooming, bedtime, or safety reasons; bunnies know whether you are confident or nervous and they react to this. If you are very nervous, it can make them nervous too, or not, but either way, they'll take advantage of it and do whatever they can to prevent you from picking them up. Just having confidence about it makes tons of difference, it is crazy. But this of course is tricky, because when you don't have experience, you don't have that confidence. Obviously you don't want to hold too tightly or too loosely since either could hurt the rabbit/allow the rabbit to hurt him/herself. MOST adults don't hold a rabbit firmly enough, because they are delicate/fragile. Hold a rabbit with approximately the firmness you'd hold a cat.
Though rabbits are held differently than guinea pigs, you may have some advantage here, but I'm not sure how adverse guinea pigs are to being picked up or how much this new bun has been handled or how well she tolerates it.
If a rabbit's struggles and protests are successful, and you're noticing this in the moment, don't tighten up your grip too much or grab at them, this can cause panic and injury. Instead, get lower to the ground (or sit down on the sofa/bed if it is close) to eliminate/lessen the drop. You can try again after and you will both get more used to it.
I just finished watching a video of how to hold a rabbit :). This is still really helpful and tysm for all the details.
 

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Rabbit Bonding
Bunnies are social and should be kept in pairs, so try to get her a companion as soon as you can (after she is spayed, if she isnt). This can be a long process though. We had Rabert for a couple years before he bonded with Rosie. At the rabbit shelter, we were able to set up "bunny dates" for Rabert, because bunnies chose their companions, not humans. You can read lots about this by searching "rabbit bonding".

Most bunnies enjoy being petted, but would rather sit/lay next to you rather than on your lap. Though we did foster a bunny that liked to sit partly on the back of the sofa and partly on your shoulder to get petted.
Rabert also would get up there, but only to attempt to get my banana as I was taking bites.

Fruit has a lot of sugar in it and should only be given as an occasional treat and in small amounts, like one 1/2" banana slice. Also, make sure any fruit/vegetable is a bunny-safe one before offering them.


To keep cool in the summer..
*Frozen water bottles are great, place one in the pen for bunny to lie up against if she is too warm. These water bottles can be refills. Switch them with others from the freezer as needed.

*Drape a damp towel over one side of the pen and run a fan in the room (pointed away from the pen) **do not use this method if your bunny likes to chew towels/blankets/etc.**

*Get your hand or a washcloth damp and gently dampen your rabbit's ears. They release heat through their ears, kinda like a dog's paws.

*If the pen is large enough, offer a ceramic tile or two to lay on for cooling down, but always make sure there is still room to stretch out off of the tile, not all bunnies will use it. Rabert loved it, Rosie has NEVER used one, she prefers to lay against a cold water bottle only or just stretch out. This was a bit strange since Rabert would NOT enter any slippery-floor rooms, but Rosie has no issues and runs around on the hardwood floors of our new house like a pro. We always had rugs all over for Rabert to use.

Don't.. point a fan towards the pen
Don't.. use ice packs where bunny could chew them
 

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I'm sorry you may not be able to give this one a home, but maybe you can help her find another home with someone. Once you're in your own place might be a better time to get a bunny anyway since not everyone in the house agrees.
Also, if you or anyone in your home is allergic to hay, a bunny is not the best pet choice, but you've had a guinea pig before.. I don't know about guinea pigs, but with a bunny, hay manages to get tracked around the house everywhere no matter how much sweeping/vacuuming is done, but this could be partially from Rosie digging in it and us wearing socks..
I'm still happy to answer questions, but convincing someone to get a pet they don't want usually isn't the best way to go about things. I know it's not what you want to hear, but showing a continued interest in something, demonstrating your knowledge and research (without pestering anyone), and consistently showing responsibility and helpfulness around the house does tend to be the best way to convince parents over time though. ;)
 

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Was litter box training addressed yet? I had a friend who's rabbit "free ranged" around the house and his home base was under her bed-he didn't have a cage. He had a litter box that he used and never made a mess in the house.
 

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Fisheye said:
Was litter box training addressed yet? I had a friend who's rabbit "free ranged" around the house and his home base was under her bed-he didn't have a cage. He had a litter box that he used and never made a mess in the house.
Briefly mentioned, but I haven't gone into details.

julifhy, let us know if you still want potty training tips.
 

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A little love story to cheer you up.. sorry it's a bit of a long read and sappy too..

The first rabbit I had my heart set on to adopt didn't work out either, but I have no regrets over this. I was 16 or 17 when I first became interested in house rabbits. At 18 (and at least a year of rabbit research), my boyfriend and I were settled into our first apartment and we felt ready for a bunny. (ready, including financially; it would be irresponsible to not plan for potential vet bills no matter how well cared for a pet is.) We also made to sure, before signing the lease, to ask the apartment management specifically about getting a rabbit, to make sure we wouldn't have to make the choice later to move out or move the rabbit out. We even listed a rabbit on the lease paperwork even though we didn't have one yet.
It took a little while to find a bunny in our area to adopt, since we had decided to not buy one from a pet or farm store (it encourages breeding mills; like cats and dogs, there are lots of rabbits in need of homes). We had not yet learned about the rabbit shelter nearby. I found "the perfect" little guy for adoption, I emailed his owner questions about his age, history, things like that, and of course we worked out the details about $ and meeting up. I was in love and I was very excited. About a week later, I got an email from her that the bunny was no longer up for adoption. It turned out that this was her boyfriend's rabbit that she was trying to get rid of, that he didn't want to get rid of and they had had a fight. What the H?! I couldn't get over how awful she was that she would try to do that (to the bunny or his human); at the same time, I was crushed, dreams shattered, no bunny for me.
Eventually, I'd guess less than a year later, I adopted my wonderful sweet "baby boy" (he was already 4-years-old) and no bun could ever replace him. He passed away, about 4 years ago (2016), after being with us for 8 very special years (He lived to be 12). He chose a great lady bun, Rosie; who, at first, couldn't care less about us, but she certainly loved him and eventually us too. Though she is still sassy and always will be, she warmed up to us in a big way, it just took her a little longer. She is a lovey, bossy, old lady bunbun with big personality. 13-years old now and hasn't slowed down. I'm very thankful for the time we've had with her and I greedily hope for a few more healthy years.
 
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julifhy

julifhy

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Ptera said:
I'm sorry you may not be able to give this one a home, but maybe you can help her find another home with someone. Once you're in your own place might be a better time to get a bunny anyway since not everyone in the house agrees.
Also, if you or anyone in your home is allergic to hay, a bunny is not the best pet choice, but you've had a guinea pig before.. I don't know about guinea pigs, but with a bunny, hay manages to get tracked around the house everywhere no matter how much sweeping/vacuuming is done, but this could be partially from Rosie digging in it and us wearing socks..
I'm still happy to answer questions, but convincing someone to get a pet they don't want usually isn't the best way to go about things. I know it's not what you want to hear, but showing a continued interest in something, demonstrating your knowledge and research (without pestering anyone), and consistently showing responsibility and helpfulness around the house does tend to be the best way to convince parents over time though. ;)
Hay was everywhere with my guinea pig too lol, but it wasn’t really a problem. My parents trust me to be responsible and they would agree to a rabbit if it was smaller. I guess the biggest issue is size. I will try my best to convince them though. I know that once he sees the rabbit for himself and knows it’s going to live in our home, he’ll be more than okay with it. If my mom is okay with a bearded dragon (she calls him her son now lol), I might be able to convince my dad for the rabbit.

Fisheye said:
Was litter box training addressed yet? I had a friend who's rabbit "free ranged" around the house and his home base was under her bed-he didn't have a cage. He had a litter box that he used and never made a mess in the house.
Ptera said:
Briefly mentioned, but I haven't gone into details.

julifhy, let us know if you still want potty training tips.
I did address it. I think she is somewhat potty trained, but I’m not 100% sure. If I do end up getting her, I was thinking of putting a litter box under where the hay would be. I read that they often poop when they eat, so I think that would work best, right? If he’s not potty trained outside of his cage, any tips on how to train him? I haven’t gotten to researching potty training yet lol.

Ptera said:
A little love story to cheer you up.. sorry it's a bit of a long read and sappy too..

The first rabbit I had my heart set on to adopt didn't work out either, but I have no regrets over this. I was 16 or 17 when I first became interested in house rabbits. At 18 (and at least a year of rabbit research), my boyfriend and I were settled into our first apartment and we felt ready for a bunny. (ready, including financially; it would be irresponsible to not plan for potential vet bills no matter how well cared for a pet is.) We also made to sure, before signing the lease, to ask the apartment management specifically about getting a rabbit, to make sure we wouldn't have to make the choice later to move out or move the rabbit out. We even listed a rabbit on the lease paperwork even though we didn't have one yet.
It took a little while to find a bunny in our area to adopt, since we had decided to not buy one from a pet or farm store (it encourages breeding mills; like cats and dogs, there are lots of rabbits in need of homes). We had not yet learned about the rabbit shelter nearby. I found "the perfect" little guy for adoption, I emailed his owner questions about his age, history, things like that, and of course we worked out the details about $ and meeting up. I was in love and I was very excited. About a week later, I got an email from her that the bunny was no longer up for adoption. It turned out that this was her boyfriend's rabbit that she was trying to get rid of, that he didn't want to get rid of and they had had a fight. What the H?! I couldn't get over how awful she was that she would try to do that (to the bunny or his human); at the same time, I was crushed, dreams shattered, no bunny for me.
Eventually, I'd guess less than a year later, I adopted my wonderful sweet "baby boy" (he was already 4-years-old) and no bun could ever replace him. He passed away, about 4 years ago (2016), after being with us for 8 very special years (He lived to be 12). He chose a great lady bun, Rosie; who, at first, couldn't care less about us, but she certainly loved him and eventually us too. Though she is still sassy and always will be, she warmed up to us in a big way, it just took her a little longer. She is a lovey, bossy, old lady bunbun with big personality. 13-years old now and hasn't slowed down.
That’s so cute! I was planning on adopting a guinea pig from a shelter near by and right when we were about to leave, I found out someone already adopted it :(. I felt heart broken too.
And even earlier than that when I was in 4th grade I kept dragging my parents to pet smart to see this one guinea pig my sister and I were trying to convince them to get. Eventually they agreed, we went to pet smart, and we found out earlier that day the guinea pig that we kept visiting had broken it’s leg and had to be put down. I was about to cry. The guinea pig I have been visiting for days died hours before I got there. But, I went to see what guinea pigs they had and there was Ginger. She was getting bullied by the other guinea pig with her, so me and my sister decided to adopt her. It was clear she was so happy with us. In the first week we had her, she was already really comfortable with us and we would play with her all the time. She quickly became a part of the family. Like I mentioned, her cage was always open. When she wanted to play, she would bite the cage in a certain place to let us know she wanted to be outside and when she wanted to go back to her cage, she would wait for me to put my hands under her belly even though she could easily jump in on her own. Sadly a year ago she passed away from old age and what I’m guessing might of been some kind of stones. Here’s a picture of Ginger and her friends:
219D4F68-077D-479C-8E34-B5196EAEC4D8.jpeg

I think you’ll be able to know which one Ginger is lol. She really stood out :)
 

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julifhy said:
I did address it. I think she is somewhat potty trained, but I’m not 100% sure. If I do end up getting her, I was thinking of putting a litter box under where the hay would be. I read that they often poop when they eat, so I think that would work best, right? If he’s not potty trained outside of his cage, any tips on how to train him? I haven’t gotten to researching potty training yet lol.
Gosh, I'm sorry I know nothing. Just wanted to share something anecdotally. I do know that the litterbox wasn't near where the rabbit ate and it was a litter pan lined with cloth diapers that she washed (ick).

Look forward to seeing pics of your rabbit!
 
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Fisheye said:
Gosh, I'm sorry I know nothing. Just wanted to share something anecdotally. I do know that the litterbox wasn't near where the rabbit ate and it was a litter pan lined with cloth diapers that she washed (ick).

Look forward to seeing pics of your rabbit!
Hopefully we do get to help rehome her. Here’s a picture the owner sent us:
AD267F02-1C8C-402E-833F-80EDEC6E1DDE.jpeg

7BBEB778-A0ED-45B1-A71E-909F9F00C42A.jpeg

Does the rabbit look a little fat to you? I don’t think she gets a lot of exercise.
 
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According to this:
She does seem overweight. Ptera does she look overweight to you?
 

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I only know about rabbits from online research so I probably can't offer very good or accurate advice.
I wish you luck! Also Ginger and her friends are so adorable!
 

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