Questions About Amano Shrimp And Ghost Shrimp

Caffee

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Im gonna skip the backstory and get right into the meat of what i need to ask. So, ive done my extensive research on three shrimp species i would be wanting to own; cherries, ghosts, and amanos. I broke it down to the two that interest me the most, the amanos and the ghosts. Now i would plan to be owning only one of these types of species in a 5.5 gallon tank with no other freshwater animals (besides maybe a snail species in the future but im mainly focusing on a small shrimp tank). Also i plan to hold live aquatic plants in the tank to help the water quality knowing these two shrimp are a bit more sensetive to water quality. Anyway, here are my main questions. Bare with me, im 100% new to cycling, ph, ammonia, etc

1.) once ive done water cycling and gotten the correct levels of ammonia (0), nitrates (0), and nitrites (0). Will it be difficult to maintain these levels once the shrimp have been added? How often should i kit test the water?

2.) ive seen a lot of different opinions on what is better for beginners like myself and which shrimp are more “hardy” and can handle water fluctuations. Some people say getting a large bundle of ghosties is the best route considering they are very cheap, but die quick due to the fact they are feeders and are kept usually in poor conditions before arrival (poor things). I love the ghosts, but their short life spans of 6-18 months stirs me away from them a bit. Do you think the ghosts will live longer considering it would only be them in the tank and it would be primed to their exact needs and not the needs of other creatures aswell?

3.) stretching from question two. Like with the ghosts, ive heard the exact same thing their amanos aswell. Ive heard people say that ghosts arent worth the struggle and getting a small bundle of amanos is the safest options and that they are the hardier species of the two. Ive heard the complete oppositie of this with them aswell too, at this point i believe its just expierence and opinion. Anyway, is the risk just the same as the ghost shrimp? They are a bit pricier (in the shrimp world), but they are considered more as pets = better treatment before arrival. If i were to get a small bundle of 3-4, are they likely to survive? Again, taking into consideration the tank would not include any competition, stress, and would be primed to their exact needs.

4.) i read about how calcium helps shrimp molt and can prevent death due to a bad molt. How can i supplement this? I heard feeding spinach can be a good sourse of calcium, but are there any good fish/shrimp foods out there (with no copper sulfate) that already have a decent calcium level?

5.) how often should i feed and how much? Seems like a simple question, but i see so much variety on this that i would just like a simple straight answer. Also, how often would i wanna feed algae wafers? I heard feeding them too often in a tank can mess with the ph levels.

6.) finally, my last question. Does gender of the fish matter when you dont plan to breed them? Will they fight over mates? Are males or females more aggressive with eachother?

Woof! If you read through all that i applaud you. I did say im new to all this, but im trying my best to learn so i can have a simple, happy, healthy critter to enjoy with the little time they have.
 

Caffee

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Im gonna skip the backstory and get right into the meat of what i need to ask. So, ive done my extensive research on three shrimp species i would be wanting to own; cherries, ghosts, and amanos. I broke it down to the two that interest me the most, the amanos and the ghosts. Now i would plan to be owning only one of these types of species in a 5.5 gallon tank with no other freshwater animals (besides maybe a snail species in the future but im mainly focusing on a small shrimp tank). Also i plan to hold live aquatic plants in the tank to help the water quality knowing these two shrimp are a bit more sensetive to water quality. Anyway, here are my main questions. Bare with me, im 100% new to cycling, ph, ammonia, etc

1.) once ive done water cycling and gotten the correct levels of ammonia (0), nitrates (0), and nitrites (0). Will it be difficult to maintain these levels once the shrimp have been added? How often should i kit test the water?

2.) ive seen a lot of different opinions on what is better for beginners like myself and which shrimp are more “hardy” and can handle water fluctuations. Some people say getting a large bundle of ghosties is the best route considering they are very cheap, but die quick due to the fact they are feeders and are kept usually in poor conditions before arrival (poor things). I love the ghosts, but their short life spans of 6-18 months stirs me away from them a bit. Do you think the ghosts will live longer considering it would only be them in the tank and it would be primed to their exact needs and not the needs of other creatures aswell?

3.) stretching from question two. Like with the ghosts, ive heard the exact same thing their amanos aswell. Ive heard people say that ghosts arent worth the struggle and getting a small bundle of amanos is the safest options and that they are the hardier species of the two. Ive heard the complete oppositie of this with them aswell too, at this point i believe its just expierence and opinion. Anyway, is the risk just the same as the ghost shrimp? They are a bit pricier (in the shrimp world), but they are considered more as pets = better treatment before arrival. If i were to get a small bundle of 3-4, are they likely to survive? Again, taking into consideration the tank would not include any competition, stress, and would be primed to their exact needs.

4.) i read about how calcium helps shrimp molt and can prevent death due to a bad molt. How can i supplement this? I heard feeding spinach can be a good sourse of calcium, but are there any good fish/shrimp foods out there (with no copper sulfate) that already have a decent calcium level?

5.) how often should i feed and how much? Seems like a simple question, but i see so much variety on this that i would just like a simple straight answer. Also, how often would i wanna feed algae wafers? I heard feeding them too often in a tank can mess with the ph levels.

6.) finally, my last question. Does gender of the fish matter when you dont plan to breed them? Will they fight over mates? Are males or females more aggressive with eachother?

Woof! If you read through all that i applaud you. I did say im new to all this, but im trying my best to learn so i can have a simple, happy, healthy critter to enjoy with the little time they have.
EDIT: sorry, i meant to say “shrimp” in question 6; not fish. Sorry for any confusion.
 

Crimson_687

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I have actually found quite healthy ghost shrimp that lived for nearly 2 years, but quite recently I have noticed a severe degrade in ghost shrimp. The last 2 I owned only lived for 3 months, and now my LFS doesn’t even get them because most arrive dead or die within a week at the LFS. I have owned Amano Shrimp for many years. Even when I was a terrible pet owner who hardly ever did water changes they somehow lived, so I’d say they are definitely very hardy. My water is hard from where I live, but if you have soft water you can supplement it with calcium supplement. You can buy it in a powder, use a cuddlefish bone, or you can buy shrimp food formulated with calcium supplement. After a year or 2 your amanos will breed, but unlike ghost shrimp the eggs will only hatch in brackish water so they will never multiply. Males will fight over females but they won’t hurt each other. As long as you drip acclimate them and do weekly water changes they will be healthy and live a long life. However if they become uncomfortable they will hop from the tank and be found dead halfway across the living room. However this should not happen as long as you acclimate them properly and the tank is well established. Amanos eat quite a lot. I use mini algae wafers and give 1 every other day or so. The 3 I have fight over it, finish about half, but also eat fallen fish flakes, decaying plant matter, and biofilm
 

Caffee

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I have actually found quite healthy ghost shrimp that lived for nearly 2 years, but quite recently I have noticed a severe degrade in ghost shrimp. The last 2 I owned only lived for 3 months, and now my LFS doesn’t even get them because most arrive dead or die within a week at the LFS. I have owned Amano Shrimp for many years. Even when I was a terrible pet owner who hardly ever did water changes they somehow lived, so I’d say they are definitely very hardy. My water is hard from where I live, but if you have soft water you can supplement it with calcium supplement. You can buy it in a powder, use a cuddlefish bone, or you can buy shrimp food formulated with calcium supplement. After a year or 2 your amanos will breed, but unlike ghost shrimp the eggs will only hatch in brackish water so they will never multiply. Males will fight over females but they won’t hurt each other. As long as you drip acclimate them and do weekly water changes they will be healthy and live a long life. However if they become uncomfortable they will hop from the tank and be found dead halfway across the living room. However this should not happen as long as you acclimate them properly and the tank is well established. Amanos eat quite a lot. I use mini algae wafers and give 1 every other day or so. The 3 I have fight over it, finish about half, but also eat fallen fish flakes, decaying plant matter, and biofilm
Wow that was a fast reply! Thanks so much! I have a feeling i might be worrying myself too much and over thinking things a bit, but your reply helped soothe some of my worries. Thanks again for the thoughtful response
 

tjander

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The majority of freshwater shrimp have a short lifespan on the range of 1 to 1 1/2 years. Ghost shrimp are by far the shortest.
Amano and ghost will not breed easily in a tank. Red cherry will breed but are a bit more difficult to get started.
In a 5 g tank you could have easily 5 ghosts or amano shrimp. 20 cherry’s. The snail will do more to fowl your water then the shrimp.
Two big things, what filter are you going to use? Also don’t add shrimp until you tank is well established like 3 to 4 months. Amano and ghosts will tolerate a lot but cherry’s not so much.
 

Crimson_687

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The majority of freshwater shrimp have a short lifespan on the range of 1 to 1 1/2 years. Ghost shrimp are by far the shortest.
Amano and ghost will not breed easily in a tank. Red cherry will breed but are a bit more difficult to get started.
In a 5 g tank you could have easily 5 ghosts or amano shrimp. 20 cherry’s. The snail will do more to fowl your water then the shrimp.
Two big things, what filter are you going to use? Also don’t add shrimp until you tank is well established like 3 to 4 months. Amano and ghosts will tolerate a lot but cherry’s not so much.
I’ve had my amano for over 2 years. I believe their lifespan is closer to 3 years if not 4
 

tjander

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Per this website 2-3 years.

Bottom line shrimp don’t live long. As compared to many fish.

Also the above website has a lotto good info just in case the OP needs it.
 

alltimelowow

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1. I've found in my tanks that shrimp don't require much more work to maintain nitrites/nitrates/ammonia than any fish. In general, water parameters should be tested at least once a week.

2/3. Never had ghosts before, but I got Amanos as a beginner and as long as your parameters stay stable and you supplement their diet everything should be fine with those.

4. I break off small pieces of cuttlebone (labelled for birds at the LFS) and put them in the tank to give my shrimp calcium.

5. I feed my Amanos an algae wafer every other day on a little plate and remove it after two hours.
 

TalulahMae

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I wouldn't try to do a shrimp tank in a 5 gal to start off with. Shrimp can be very sensitive to gH levels in your water, and a 5 gal is going to shift parameters a lot more with evaporation than a larger tank. Just my two cents. I have personally decided not to keep shrimp right now because my gH out of the tap is way high, kH is way low. This means I'd have to mix tap and RO and still have to raise the kH in my water. It's just a lot of work to do. If your water is great out of the tap it might be easier for you but I would suggest definitely knowing the gH and kH of your water before committing to shrimp.
 

tjander

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So I disagree keep shrimp in a 5g tank is a good use for it. Yes water parameters are going to change quicker then in. 55 but it’s still very manageable. You just need to monitor it often. Also if possible do not try to adjust your water. You may need to add to it to Increases your KH and GH but it’s not tough to do.
Just remember to let it get well established before you add shrimp I am talking 3-5 months. I like to add a couple guppy’s to it for this time period to keep the cycle going. But remove them before you add shrimper you run the risk of them eating your shrimp. Don’t be afraid to try a couple times, cherry’s can be tough to get started but are a lot of fun once off and running
Besides what else are you goi g to put in a 5g tank?
 

Crimson_687

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I think 5g is perfectly fine for shrimp keepers willing to keep up with maintenance and establish a planted tank. IMO 5g Aquascapes are expensive yet perfect for shrimp and elegant
 

angelcraze

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I’ve had my amano for over 2 years. I believe their lifespan is closer to 3 years if not 4
My amanos are at the very least 5 years old. I really think they are older as I got 6 of them second hand. Don't know how many are left, maybe not all 10, but there's still quite a few! Definitely longest lived. Bamboo shrimp live longer as well.
 

lojack

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My amanos are at the very least 5 years old. I really think they are older as I got 6 of them second hand. Don't know how many are left, maybe not all 10, but there's still quite a few! Definitely longest lived. Bamboo shrimp live longer as well.
Same here! Two of my Amanos are at least 5 years old. They were about an inch long already so most likely a little older. If you keep the water clean they’ll hang around for a long time.
 

tjander

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Well I sit corrected... tell me it’s not true the WWW was wrong about the avg life of Amano shrimp. .
Thanks for sitting the record straight, I guess after years of aquatics you can still learn something. Thanks
 

lojack

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Well I sit corrected... tell me it’s not true the WWW was wrong about the avg life of Amano shrimp. .
Thanks for sitting the record straight, I guess after years of aquatics you can still learn something. Thanks
Lol, when I got them I assumed I’d be replacing them in a couple of years. I did lose 2 of my original 4 at around 2 years old. So it kind of averages out to around three years for those 4 haha.

I’ll admit because of their age I always do a double take whenever they molt. I expect to see a dead shrimp one of these days instead of just an old exoskeleton.
 

angelcraze

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Lol, when I got them I assumed I’d be replacing them in a couple of years. I did lose 2 of my original 4 at around 2 years old. So it kind of averages out to around three years for those 4 haha.

I’ll admit because of their age I always do a double take whenever they molt. I expect to see a dead shrimp one of these days instead of just an old exoskeleton.
I don't see a dead shrimp lol. It's cleaned up before I know it. I just know that I bought three females and a male 5 years ago and got 6 males from a friend around the same time, I still see quite a few at the same time. They like to pick near the prefilter. Amazing really!
20190806_001735.jpg
 
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