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whitetasia

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I have a red tail shark in my tank, she still fairly new like most of my fish. I'm guessing that the red tail is female, my father looked up on signs, and stated it was a girl... But the yesterday she was swimming at the top of the tank upside down... That in its self isn't to weird I guess, but her belly was really big, and she's the only shark in the tank. She seems fine now but it was really odd. But I'd like to know what might have been wrong with her, should I be worried?
 

Isabella

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First off: how large is your tank and how many (and what kinds of) fish do you have in it? How long have you had your tank running? How soon after you set up your tank, did you get your fish? How many fish did you get at once?

Are you familiar with the Nitrogen Cycle? If you can, please post your ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate readings.

And welcome to Fish Lore by the way
 
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whitetasia

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I moved and reset up the tank, about 3 weeks ago. There are mainly guppies in the tank, with an allege eater, a bottom feeder, and some tetras. I've only had most fish for about 2 weeks. The allege eater was from before I moved. I haven't unpacked the stuff to check the pH, so I'm not sure what the numbers are. We did do a water change, yesterday. Also I just started to treat the fish for fin rot. The water in the tank is also cloud... I'm not sure why, because I've never had cloudy water before. I let my father set the tank up. The tank is a 20 gallon tank.

Thank you, for your help!
 

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Your tank is most likely cycling, so please - once again - take the time to read about the nitrogen cycle. Go to the top of the Beginner's board, and read the Beginner's articles that are there. Otherwise it will be hard to help you if you don't know what cycling a tank means.

If your tank is still cycling that means your water has ammonia and/or nitrite - both of which are very toxic compounds to fish. They can kill the fish or make them very sick. Which is why I need to know your ammonia and nitrite readings in particular (and not so much the pH). If you learn about the cycle, you'll know better what ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate are as well as why it's important to have tests for them.

Now, if there are even smallest amounts of ammonia and nitrite in your water, your fish will keep getting sick or dying. You need to be doing 50% daily water changes for AS LONG as you have ammonia and/or nitrite in your water, UNTIL both compounds = 0. Your fish are sick most likely because your tank is still cycling and either ammonia or nitrite is making them sick. This is why it is always best to cycle the tank FIRST, before getting any fish. When the tank is cycled, ammonia = 0, nitrite = 0, and nitrate = some number (however, it's best to keep nitrate as low as possible too, and that is done by regular weekly water changes). The cycle may take anywhere between 4 - 6 weeks (though it took me less than 4 weeks) if you cycle without fish. If you put fish in the tank before it is cycled, the cycle will last much longer.

May I know how many guppies and how many tetras (and what kind they are) you have? Also, what kind of an algae eater do you have?

Lastly, cloudy water is another indicator of the fact that your tank is cycling. So, please read about the cycle. And if you don't have the tests for ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate, you really should get them. Aquarium Pharmaceuticals Freshwater Master Test Kit has all of these tests and it's very cheap on Big Al's Online: .

P.S. Do you dechlorinate your tap water before adding it to your tank?
 
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whitetasia

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corydoras, placatismus, and the tetras are coloured black tetras, (pink and blue ones). My tank is at it max right now, my guppies happen to be males. Also I'm not a beginner at fish, I grown up with them, and have had this one for about 4 years. The only thing different with the tanks set up is the adding of "Bacteria Supplement", it causes the water to cloud for a wail, other then that nothing different has happen. I just wish to know why I have a fish that looked like it was going to die, and then the next day was fine. I understand were you're going but I'm quit sure that is not playing a factor in the odd behaivor in my red tail shark. Though the point she traveled 350 k to get the her new home might. The guppies, and shark were bought out of town. They actually were purchased at a "Big Al's"
 

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Well, this is why I am telling you to get a test kit: if you post your ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate readings, it will be easier to determine what's wrong with your fish. If you're 100% sure your tank is cycled (although if you've had it set up for less than about a month, it IS still cycling), then there can be many other reasons for cloudy water. Adding any chemicals to your water may cloud it. But ... if your tank is still cycling, this is the reason why your water is cloudy.
 

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