PSA: Carpeting Plant Seeds Are A Scam

Fahn

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While this was touched upon lightly in my DSM thread, this has become a bit of a rampant trend as of late. I see threads not only here on Fishlore but on other sites and social media platforms where people are using "magic carpet" seeds with the promise of a lush, dense carpet without the headache of high lighting, CO2 injection, or a fertilizer regiment. Just sprinkle seeds on wet soil, wait two weeks, and BOOM, instant dwarf baby tears!

Folks... please do not buy these seeds. They are sold under myriad names on places like eBay or Amazon, but they are never what they claim to be. Usually, the seeds for plants claiming to be Glossostigma, HC, etc, are a species of Hygrophila seeds, usually H. polysperma but sometimes varieties that aren't even aquatic are sold. These plants start out as tiny, cute green sprouts that superficially resemble carpeting plants... for a couple of weeks. Then they overrun your tank, growing into tall, leafy stem plants or, if they are not a true aquatic,will die and melt.

Other species I have seen sold as carpeting plant seeds include chia, basil, and lemongrass seeds, all of which will die after the tank is filled with water once the initial growth is established.

Most of these seeds are acquired cheaply overseas in traditional Chinese medicine shops or spice markets; in India, H. polysperma seeds are used to treat various STDs. These seeds are packaged, labeled as aquarium carpet seeds, and sold to well-intentioned but uninformed hobbyists, especially those who are apprehensive when it comes to purchasing and using CO2 equipment or dosing fertilizers.

More often than not, these seeds lead to 2 things:

1 - The seeds are an aquatic species but are not as labeled. They grow rapidly and get very large, dominating the tank because of the sheer volume of seeds used, and no amount of trimming will keep them looking like they did in the beginning.

2 - They are not true aquatic plants, and after a couple of weeks underwater will die and begin to rot, fouling the substrate and water.

Either way, it usually warrants a complete scrap-and-reset of the tank. Many times I have caught somebody attempting these seeds before they are added, and can save them the headache of dealing with the ensuing mess.

Save your money, don't order these seeds. They are dubious in origin and are never what they promise to be. Carpeting plants, for the most part, almost always require higher lighting, CO2 injection, a nutrient-rich substrate and a fertilizer dosing routine. There are exceptions, but that's just how they are. Many, in nature, are not even fully submerged but are marginal plants, and without sufficient lighting and CO2 will die. These plants are NEVER sold as seeds, and I have never heard of a hobbyist who has successfully cultivated them with seeds. They are sold as mats, pots, bundles, or tissue cultures, the latter being my favorite way to purchase and plant them, personally.

If you have a question about a carpeting plant (or any plant), it is best to consult your peers. These forums are a wealth of information, and the last thing any of us want is for a beginner hobbyist to be discouraged because they are forced to tear down the tank because they purchased a falsely advertised product.
 
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Fahn

Fahn

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FinalFins said:
I have a question- if one did want to accomplish a tank filled with large plants that grow large would it be a gamble to buy the seeds?
As mentioned, a lot of the times the seeds are Hygrophila polysperma, which are a true aquatic. Keep in mind H. polysperma is illegal to buy or sell in the US, yet you can still order the seeds for some reason. I have seen H. polysperma growing in ditches here in FL.

If they are the aforementioned plant, they will thrive and you'll end up with basically a forest of stem plants. If they are one of the varieties of Hygro that are emersed or terrestrial by nature, they will rot and die.

You could buy the seeds and test a small batch in a vase or other container though. :)
 

Nickguy5467

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i learned this the hard way a couple years ago think they were labled dwarf grass seeds. it was my first tank. i was slightly more dumb then
 

qldmick

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This reminds me of the rainbow rose seeds they sell on ebay australia.
s-l1600.jpg

Complete scam.
 
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Fahn

Fahn

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qldmick said:
This reminds me of the rainbow rose seeds they sell on ebay australia.
s-l1600.jpg

Complete scam.
I used to see those on Facebook and Wish all the time lol
 

smee82

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I have tried seeds in china and i wouldnt reccomend them either
 

depan89

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oh how I wish I did some research here, before buying the seeds :eek:
 

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