Promoting anaerobic bacteria?

Wardonianfungus

Member
Hi! I have a play sand capped, dirted tank. I have noticed random air bubbles floating to the surface. How can I promote anaerobic bacteria the grow?
 

SM1199

Member
From what I understand, establishing a deep substrate (which you've probably already done with the dirt and sand) and not disturbing it too much or too often is the way to go, and that's the biggest part of it. I'm no pro on the topic, but this may be helpful:
0 Nitrites Is Easy
 
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Wardonianfungus

Member
Ok thanks I’ll look at that link. How deep should it be?
 

SM1199

Member
Wardonianfungus said:
Ok thanks I’ll look at that link. How deep should it be?
2.5-3 inches, per OP of that thread.
 
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Wardonianfungus

Member
Ok, I’m good with that then. I don’t understand how I could have so many airbubbles
. I’ll research it later
 

SM1199

Member
Wardonianfungus said:
Ok, I’m good with that then. I don’t understand how I could have so many airbubbles
. I’ll research it later
The air bubbles are the gaseous nitrogen that are released by anaerobic bacteria as a result of denitrification, so if that's what you're concerned about, have no fear - that's what you want to see. Anaerobic means no oxygen, not no air, as the name may confusingly suggest.
 
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Wardonianfungus

Member
Oh okay thanks. I was concerned about the bubbles, I thought they were bad. Thanks for the help
 

DoubleDutch

Member
SM1199 said:
The air bubbles are the gaseous nitrogen that are released by anaerobic bacteria as a result of denitrification, so if that's what you're concerned about, have no fear - that's what you want to see. Anaerobic means no oxygen, not no air, as the name may confusingly suggest.
or other (worse) gasses
 

sfsamm

Member
DoubleDutch said:
or other (worse) gasses
This can definitely be true... If you have decaying organics under the soil that can be a primary indicator that you have an issue. Long time mentor of mine told me years ago the best way to know of you have good or bad substrate is 2 fold.... 1- If you have small bubbles even many in one area you're probably in a fine place, if you hit large bubbles or a pocket of medium sized bubbles you may have an issue. 2- Bad bubbles will smell bad as well, like sulphur.

In 30 years I have frequently noticed most of my tanks will kick up bubbler size bubbles and slightly larger bubbles fairly regularly after being running several months and getting good and stable. Last year I hit for the first time what in all likelihood was no good. Smelled immediately though not the stench I had always expected and was a bubble probably between a nickel and a dime in size but towards the larger end of that range for sure. Smell faded rather quickly and had I not noticed the bubble itself I may not have paid any attention.... I was at the time digging for and removing a patch of failed plants that I knew had been doing poorly for sometime and I should have dealt with several weeks prior. There was no side effects to my fish whatsoever but I did grab my python and very throughly mucked that spot after I finished removing the plant mess and sucked up some nasty looking debris I can only assume was something rotting down there.

I would do the same in the future and can't honestly say it was or wasn't anything particular. I would say if you keep your tanks maintained your unlikely to get bad stuff going on down there as only once ever did I think "maybe" that was bad.
 
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Wardonianfungus

Member
Well considering that, I’m fine. I’ve had a few smaller medium sized bubbles but they were all scattered and didn’t smell
 

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