Pro/cons Of A Saltwater Tank? Question

Discussion in 'More Saltwater Aquarium Topics' started by Ipman37, Sep 9, 2019.

  1. Ipman37

    Ipman37Valued MemberMember

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    I’m curious on everyone’s response on there own challenges with their tank.Like what was the most challenging part of the build/easiest would you change something different if you could(knowing what you know now)before starting it?.What size tank did you start with etc etc.And just let out what you feel would be a good starting size tank for someone new to saltwater? :)
     
  2. bettaf1sh 7789

    bettaf1sh 7789Valued MemberMember

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    I started with a 40 gallon with a HOB filter and HOB skimmer, great little tank! And it started leaking… so I got a used Red Sea tank from a local store that sells mostly used supplies, paid about $500 and another $100 or so for them to come deliver and setup… well their definition of setup was take the dirty tank (there was literally garbage in the AIO sump part) and fill it with some saltwater that was reading almost 1.040. Luckily I had my fish in a small 10 gallon when this was all done and was smart enough to test water before adding anything, so I didn’t lose anything. Later, the tank started blowing fuses almost daily because the fluorescent lights in the hood were literally blowing up (ohhh… so that’s why they gave me the spare hood o_O) we spent many hours attempting to fix it, and many fuses blew, and many things blew up on us. When all was said and done, we got 3 of the 5 lights working. Tank lasted maybe 6 months, it started crashing because it was never cleaned properly, even though they assured us that their supplies were cleaned and tested. When all was said and done, we paid $500 for a tank that was supposed to be “plug and play” or as my mom said… “plug and pay” it was supposed to have a functional skimmer, two return pumps, and the hood, all of which were not functional and required replacements or modifications. I now have a 100 gallon water box tank with a sump, I love it! I would say to anyone starting out, be careful when buying used, test things yourself and clean things properly, don’t take someone’s word for it, stores that wanna make a quick buck will take advantage of new hobbyists like I was… and don’t let the fish store setup your tank LOL. Luckily I didn’t lose anything, but having that tank was miserable. I’d say about 30 gallons is a good beginner size, small enough that it won’t necessarily drain your bank account, but large enough that you have some room for errors with water quality.
     
  3. OP
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    Ipman37

    Ipman37Valued MemberMember

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    Thank you for sharing your experience, and most pet stores do take advantage of new pet keepers any chance they get or they just don’t know what their talking about at all.But I’m glad it worked out in the end for you,best of luck !
     
  4. bettaf1sh 7789

    bettaf1sh 7789Valued MemberMember

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    Yup, that’s the best advice I can give to anyone, do your own research and don’t trust a store with setting up your aquarium. Since then I’ve found a lfs that’s pretty good and gives decent advice that doesn’t exclusively involve buying things.
     
  5. Jesterrace

    JesterraceWell Known MemberMember

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    The most challenging part outside of the frequent maintenance is the time taken for cycling and getting your rockwork to fit together the way you want. As far as things I wish I knew I would say it has to do with how much smaller/more peaceful fish hide and make your tank look empty. Not saying get aggressive fish, but I would say that I would research fish that are a bit more bold and visible. I made that mistake when I did my first tank and more often than not the tank would look near empty despite the fact that I had 4-5 fish in there. I also wish I had known about Wrasses when I first got my tank, IMHO the most underrated fish in the hobby when it comes to the generally peaceful varieties in terms of individual personalities, level of activity and visibility, and stunning colors.

    As for the size of the tank it honestly all depends on what you want to keep and how often you are unavailable to do tank maintenance (ie do you travel a lot). One of the things I would recommend doing is to spend some time on www.liveaquaria.com and look at their recommended minimum tank sizes on a given fish you are interested in and go from there. One thing to remember is that when it comes to saltwater fish that length followed by width are the most important things to remember when it comes to fish stocking options (height doesn't make much difference other than taller tanks making it harder to get good flow to, harder to get good lighting for corals, and more of a pain to clean). Anymore than 21 inches in height is a waste unless you are literally going for the biggest fish in the hobby.

    BTW here is but one example of a beautiful wrasse:

     
  6. OP
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    Ipman37

    Ipman37Valued MemberMember

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    I’ve seen most SW hobbyist tanks do seem semi empty and most Lfs around here that carry SW fish say that have a lot in the tank but only two are normally seen swimming around,Normally I’ve seen the cleaners more then the fish themselves lol,and that is one stunning wrasse!
     
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