pro and cons of live plants

rcf_85

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Advice on getting started pros and cons. Low maintenance plants.
 

Brandon Bennett

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I can't think of any cons but depending on what you get you will need to fertilize. Even wtih nutrient-rich substrates, many will need water column fertilizers and an appropriate amount of light. It all adds up.

If you're like me, the low maintenance plants are great but sooner or later you'll want higher maintenance plants which require CO2 and better lighting.

I spend an enormous amount of money on fertilizers, lighting, and CO2. The fish are pennies in comparison.
 

Mr.Cody

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pros -
they help maintain lower nitrate levels and ammonia spikes
they look fantastic (imo)
live plants give snacks to herbivors and omnivors between meals
they can help keep water crystal clear
and much much more im probly forgetting

cons -
some plants require better more costly light fixtures to get the proper amount of light to stay healthy
heavily planted tanks need co2 suplements
some plants require fertilizers as well as co2
really the only cons i can think of is that it will cosst more to rais plants in the tank than if you just had fish and decor
 

fishnewbie33

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I think the pros far outweigh the cons.

One more con, hitchhikers... snails, parasites, possibly other diseases.

Pro...with the proper qt or other treatment, you can enjoy them in your tanks!
 

Mr.Cody

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a good idea to avoid pests and outher things the plants might bring is let the new plants sit in a bucket of freshwater mixed with aquarium salt (not sea salt)it will kill most snails and all snail eggs then you can always just pick threw them to find the ones it didnt kill before adding them into youre display

but yes the pros do outweigh the cons by a long shot i love the natural look myself it just gives the tank that pop color and life
 

fishnewbie33

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a good idea to avoid pests and outher things the plants might bring is let the new plants sit in a bucket of freshwater mixed with aquarium salt (not sea salt)it will kill most snails and all snail eggs then you can always just pick threw them to find the ones it didnt kill before adding them into youre display

but yes the pros do outweigh the cons by a long shot i love the natural look myself it just gives the tank that pop color and life
After my disastrous experience with hydrogen peroxide, I use qt and alum, no problems with that combo.
 

Roxie Brookshire

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Pros:
  • Evens out water parameters
  • Keeps algae at bay if done correctly
  • Mitigates aggressive behavior in community tanks
  • Gives fry and small/timid fish a place to hide
  • Attractive
  • Adds oxygen to water column during light hours


Cons:
  • Lighting is expensive
  • Requires fertilizer
  • Dying plants can pollute water
  • Hitchhiking pest snails
  • More difficult to clean tank
  • Some fish/inverts will eat your plants
  • Some plants may shed, become leggy, or invasive (duckweed springs to mind)



Two reasons to keep live plants:
You have your heart set on a species of fish that prefers them (rainbows, angels, gouramis, smaller teras)
You like the look of a planted tank

I am okay with being a non-planted person at the moment. The thought of CO2 and fancy lighting scares me and causes me to have a twinge in my wallet.
 

Mr.Cody

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Pros:

  • The thought of CO2 and fancy lighting scares me and causes me to have a twinge in my wallet.


  • i dont blame you the lighting can get pretty costly and i buy simple ferts and liquid co2 for my plants and its adding up as i go but i love the natural look of the plants in a tank so its a small price to pay to have many fish happy

    After my disastrous experience with hydrogen peroxide, I use qt and alum, no problems with that combo.
    thats good atleast you found something that works good i know there are many ways out there and maby more people will come along wither there methods
 
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endlercollector

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It can be very cheap to have plants, depending on your tank size.

1) T8 light fixture (2nd hand on Craigslist). with warm daylight GE fluorescent bulb (6500 kelvins)

2) duckweed (a little not will turn into a lot very quickly) and bacopa (ditto). The latter can be a pain to root, but it'll do fine in gravel. You could see if anyone around you is pruning their plants or clearing their extra duckweed.

That's it. Depending on if you already have the T8 and your sources, your costs can range from $10 to $30 for a 10-20 gallon tank. Add $15 if you need a glass lid.

Pros already gone over by others. Cons: with fast growing water weeds, you have to prune, someone's clear bits out of your filter, and make sure that you don't let any get in the waterways.
 
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Dolfan

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There are many plants available that are very easy to grow, without fancy lights, fertilizers, and CO2. They provide a natural habitat for the fish to help ease stress, all while helping to clean the water. With plants in a tank, any small ammonia and/or nitrite spike is taken care of as most plants will readily absorb these as fertilizer. Oxygenating the water is also a plus.

Good easy beginner plants to start with include java moss, java fern, bacopa, frogbit, anacharis, hornwort, just to name a few. Do some research and figure out a couple to start with then go from there. Plantedtank.net is a great plant specific site that has a lot of info on plants. There info pages on different plants are great. They have almost any plant you can think of with pics, care requirements, and tips from people who have grown them before.
 

_Fried_Bettas_

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Lighting and electricity are the main expenses. If you buy dry ferts, the cost is essentially nil. If you are talking about low light only, they require so little they don't add any appreciable cost other than have an appropriate light fixture, but a there are plenty of lights good enough for low light for little expense and now days many tanks come with sufficient LED lighting (for low light).

Fish appear to appreciate the presence of live plants, especially those who like to hide or create territory in them. I can't really picture not having live plants in my tanks, to me they are an essential part of an aquarium. I even put plants in my bare bottom tanks, obviously plants that don't need to be rooted.
 
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rcf_85

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thanks. i will give it a try in one of my tanks and if all goes well i will expand it to the rest. i will look into low light plants.
 
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rcf_85

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just purchased some hornwort off ebay seem like a good starter plant.
 

Mr.Cody

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i had that problem with my water sprite at first they lost there center leaves but after about a month they were all back and healthier than when i got them 3 months later i now have 4 bunches of them from the 1 bunch i bought at the lfs

i wish you the best of luck with youre plants and im sure you will love them after you get the hang of takeing care of them
 
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