Possible Parasite

Discussion in 'Freshwater Beginners' started by Corycat, Aug 4, 2017.

  1. Corycat

    Corycat Valued Member Member

    Hey everyone!

    I've been to my lfs and called another one noone seems to know what Im talking about. Maybe one of you will. Basically I went to aforementioned fish store and bought some pygmy Salt and Pepper cories. They said they were quarantined at the store and they are the "best" store around locally. They haven't calmed down since I brought them home. That was Monday. Lfs said to try General Cure. Yesterday, Thursday, I noticed some of my fish having respiratory problems. I've checked all the parameters 0 ammonia, 0 nitrite, 5-10 nitrate. I thought it may be the General Cure. So I did a water change. When I dump my buckets I usually check the bottom to make sure I'm not tossing out any snails. That's when I noticed what I think is causing the trouble-very small pepper looking "bugs". Definitely not copepods, I have those in my Amano shrimp tank and are familiar with them and how they look. Can anyone tell me what this may be and how to get rid of it? Also, this is the LAST time I go without a quarantine tank. As soon as I can I plan to start one so my community doesn't have this problem again. I appreciate any input or advice.
     
  2. Caitlin86

    Caitlin86 Well Known Member Member

    Pictures would help immensely
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Corycat

    Corycat Valued Member Member

    Lol I'm currently trying. They are so hard to see it's a little difficult. I'm trying to upload a video

    Alright so I guess this site wont allow my video. That stinks because they are tiny little black particles swimming. Almost like fleas?
     




    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 4, 2017
  4. Keystone

    Keystone Well Known Member Member

    If they are small black dots that are free swimmers they are most likely ostracods - also known as seed shrimp.

    There are thousands of species ranging from too small to see to about the size of a ping pong ball.

    Almost all found in aquaria are harmless.

    Their eggs are very durable and can survive for extended periods of time until conditions are right. They commonly inhabit vernal pools and their eggs often endure drying out for months or years before hatching out again
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Corycat

    Corycat Valued Member Member

    I just looked at video of ostracod but it's not that. They are black and little fleas jerky little swimmers.
     
  6. Keystone

    Keystone Well Known Member Member

    If they swim in jerky movements they are not ostracods

    No luck on a picture or video yet?
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Corycat

    Corycat Valued Member Member

    Yes! I've uploaded a video in the "1" folder somewhere on my profile because it wouldn't let me post it onto this discussion

    It's in my aquarium photos. What you are looking at is a white former kool whip container. Inside is the aquarium water with poop I also gravel vacced out. Watch closely and you will see the little jerks swimming. I'm assuming it has to be a parasite that came with the fish. So far I've lost an oto cat, and 2 cories with another looking grim. There's been no change in the parameters.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 4, 2017
  8. Keystone

    Keystone Well Known Member Member

    Looks like ostracods in the video to me....the black dots aren't moving in jerky bursts. I have a friend that compares their swimming to a drunken bumblebee. I'll look for your aquarium photos and let you know if it alters my opinion

    Edit: sorry - I misread and thought you had photos and the video. I'll try to take pics/videos of similar ones I have for you to compare.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Corycat

    Corycat Valued Member Member

    Ok that would be awesome! When I looked on youtube for others with ostracods after you suggested it, they looked different. I am just at a loss because I don't know why else the fish would be passing. At very first I thought it may be a water quality issue but I thought it was doubtful at the same time because everything has been good in that department for some time. I am pretty good at that part of the hobby. I've never noticed it before. I also found a dead copepod too which I found strange. But come to think of it when I examined that bucket looking for the corpse I didn't see anything like this. It has to be a new thing these mystery creatures

    What I mean when I never noticed it before is these creatures. I examine the tanks daily. No new plants or gravel or equipment. Just these tiny cories.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 4, 2017
  10. Keystone

    Keystone Well Known Member Member

    I couldn't upload video either - had to do same thing you did. My album is titled "A".

    Watch carefully and you can see them swimming through the duckweed roots
     
  11. OP
    OP
    Corycat

    Corycat Valued Member Member

    You know when you say "drunken butterfly" I mean perhaps that's indeed what these are. I feel bad because I've dosed the tank with clout because even if these guys aren't what's causing the problem, I suspect there is some sort of parasite at play here. It's the only thi ng I can think of. I'm hoping to save the remaining fish I have in this tank. The bad news is I think my 55 gallon is contaminated too. :/
     
  12. Keystone

    Keystone Well Known Member Member

    You probably didn't notice them before because you didn't have them before. They are well known for appearing out of nowhere. Eggs can remain dormant for very long times. Some species can even survive being digested by fish.
     
  13. OP
    OP
    Corycat

    Corycat Valued Member Member

    Wow that's quite incredible. They say you learn something new everyday, thank you for teaching me this new thing! I didn't even know they existed before you mentioned it. The same thing happened with the copepods. I was like what is this?! Lol!
     




  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice