Please Help!!!!! Something Wrong With My Angelfish?

Millerific
  • #1
I have had this big, beautiful Angelfish for months now and he's my favorite. He's in my 46 gallon tank, but recently he started acting really weird. He will still eat if I put food in front of him. Normally, he is all around the tank exploring and searching for food, and he'll come to the front of the tank when I tap the lid (that's how I let them know there's food). Recently, he's been sitting in the top back of the tank, maybe 0.5 inches from the surface, breathing heavily. It's really weird. Once again, he does eat. Does he have a disease? He's not full grown, or very old, yet. My other Angel is doing just fine, and same with all the other fish. However, I did lose one of my Mollies recently who was also acting weird like the Angelfish.
PLEASE HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
DutchAquarium
  • #2
Post some pictures so we can help you

temp
recent changes
chemistry
 
Millerific
  • Thread Starter
  • #3
Please reply soon! I don't have much time!

Post some pictures so we can help you

temp
recent changes
chemistry
Ok I'll try here soon
Tank temp: 75 degrees Fahrenheit
Recent Changes: Added 2 Mollies to the tank, 1 died
Chemistry: All good, No Ammonia or Nitrites, around 5-10 nitrates
 
DutchAquarium
  • #4
First thing, angelfish like it warmer, around 78 degrees. He could of had a weakened system because of the cold temp
 
Millerific
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
Just remembered another recent change: My main filter broke around 2-3 weeks ago, but I have a backup filter that I'm running on it.

First thing, angelfish like it warmer, around 78 degrees. He could of had a weakened system because of the cold temp
Hmm, weird. He was acting fine until recently...I'll try it.

Ok, I have a picture
20180320_174751.jpg
 
Jenoli42
  • #6
That is odd behaviour... i've never kept angle fish. has your pH changed recently? do you have airstones? notice any redness near the gills?
 
Millerific
  • Thread Starter
  • #7
That is odd behaviour... i've never kept angle fish. has your pH changed recently? do you have airstones? notice any redness near the gills?
No redness near the gills. The PH I have is very hard..even after I got a water softener. I do not have an airstone, the flow of the filter made enough oxygen.
 
Jenoli42
  • #8
although petco isn't the best for treating fish properly or giving good advice in their retail stores, their advice on their website about what might be happening is pretty solid:

"One thing you don’t want to see, however, is a fish that is spending a lot of time right near the surface of the water—perhaps gasping—and in apparent distress.

A fish may linger near the surface because he’s trying to breathe more easily. Remember, fish breathe dissolvedoxygen—not oxygen that is already combined in the H2O molecule. Naturally, these dissolved oxygen levels tend to be higher near the surface, where interaction between air and water takes place. A fish that is not receiving enough oxygen will try to compensate by gravitating toward that area. Similarly, you may notice your fish lingering near the bubbles of your air stones or other bubble-producing décor.

An individual fish might not be getting enough oxygen because of a problem with his gills, such as gill flukes, parasites or injury. However, if you notice that multiple fish are trying to breathe at the surface of your aquarium, then it's likely that something is wrong with the conditions of your habitat:


Water Quality
Begin your troubleshooting process by performing a water test to rule out any issues with water quality (such as temperature, ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, hardness, salinity levels or pH levels). Next, try to determine other reasons your aquarium may be lacking oxygen. For example, if the water is cloudy or polluted, you may be overfeeding your fish, or you may have a dead fish in the tank. In either case, you will need to replace as much water as is needed to bring your tank conditions back into a healthy balance (typically up to one-third of the water is recommended).


Overcrowding
An overstocked aquarium—with too many fish polluting the water and competing for the same air supply—can cause low oxygen levels. For freshwater fish, start with the rule of thumb of "one gallon per one inch of adult fish," but keep in mind that this benchmark doesn't take into consideration the fact that some fish are larger-bodied and some varieties are more taxing on the aquarium environment than others. Use this rule only as a guideline when calculating the appropriate aquarium size and then do additional research. (Also, be sure to calculate the adult sizes of the fish in your aquarium—not the one- or two-inch juvenile fish that you bring home.)

Another cause of low oxygen in an aquarium can be a lack of surface area. Rather than considering only the volume of your aquarium, think about purchasing one with a larger surface area—that is, one with more air contact. Two aquariums might have the same volume, but if the shape of one allows it to have more surface area (shallower rather than taller), it will have higher oxygen levels, and that's always good.


Lack of Aeration
Keep your habitat's water on the move, because mixing existing water with the surface water helps maintain good water quality and a good supply of dissolved oxygen. A set-up of properly maintained filters is critical for removing waste. In some situations, an even more powerful form of aeration—such as a power head—may be needed. Bubble-producing décor elements like an air stone or bubble wand can also add small amounts of oxygen, but are more for decorative purposes.


Improper Water Temperature
Water temperature can also play a role in oxygen concentration. Warm water holds less oxygen than cold water, so during summer months keep an eye on your habitat's temperature. Avoid letting it rise too high for long periods of time.

Finally, keep in mind that some varieties of fish—like betas and gourami's—are actually supposed to breathe air from the surface. So if your aquarium is home to one or more of these, be sure that you don’t mistake normal behavior for an oxygen issue."
 
Millerific
  • Thread Starter
  • #9
although petco isn't the best for treating fish properly or giving good advice in their retail stores, their advice on their website about what might be happening is pretty solid:

"One thing you don’t want to see, however, is a fish that is spending a lot of time right near the surface of the water—perhaps gasping—and in apparent distress.

A fish may linger near the surface because he’s trying to breathe more easily. Remember, fish breathe dissolvedoxygen—not oxygen that is already combined in the H2O molecule. Naturally, these dissolved oxygen levels tend to be higher near the surface, where interaction between air and water takes place. A fish that is not receiving enough oxygen will try to compensate by gravitating toward that area. Similarly, you may notice your fish lingering near the bubbles of your air stones or other bubble-producing décor.

An individual fish might not be getting enough oxygen because of a problem with his gills, such as gill flukes, parasites or injury. However, if you notice that multiple fish are trying to breathe at the surface of your aquarium, then it's likely that something is wrong with the conditions of your habitat:


Water Quality
Begin your troubleshooting process by performing a water test to rule out any issues with water quality (such as temperature, ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, hardness, salinity levels or pH levels). Next, try to determine other reasons your aquarium may be lacking oxygen. For example, if the water is cloudy or polluted, you may be overfeeding your fish, or you may have a dead fish in the tank. In either case, you will need to replace as much water as is needed to bring your tank conditions back into a healthy balance (typically up to one-third of the water is recommended).


Overcrowding
An overstocked aquarium—with too many fish polluting the water and competing for the same air supply—can cause low oxygen levels. For freshwater fish, start with the rule of thumb of "one gallon per one inch of adult fish," but keep in mind that this benchmark doesn't take into consideration the fact that some fish are larger-bodied and some varieties are more taxing on the aquarium environment than others. Use this rule only as a guideline when calculating the appropriate aquarium size and then do additional research. (Also, be sure to calculate the adult sizes of the fish in your aquarium—not the one- or two-inch juvenile fish that you bring home.)

Another cause of low oxygen in an aquarium can be a lack of surface area. Rather than considering only the volume of your aquarium, think about purchasing one with a larger surface area—that is, one with more air contact. Two aquariums might have the same volume, but if the shape of one allows it to have more surface area (shallower rather than taller), it will have higher oxygen levels, and that's always good.


Lack of Aeration
Keep your habitat's water on the move, because mixing existing water with the surface water helps maintain good water quality and a good supply of dissolved oxygen. A set-up of properly maintained filters is critical for removing waste. In some situations, an even more powerful form of aeration—such as a power head—may be needed. Bubble-producing décor elements like an air stone or bubble wand can also add small amounts of oxygen, but are more for decorative purposes.


Improper Water Temperature
Water temperature can also play a role in oxygen concentration. Warm water holds less oxygen than cold water, so during summer months keep an eye on your habitat's temperature. Avoid letting it rise too high for long periods of time.

Finally, keep in mind that some varieties of fish—like betas and gourami's—are actually supposed to breathe air from the surface. So if your aquarium is home to one or more of these, be sure that you don’t mistake normal behavior for an oxygen issue."
Well I'll be doing a water change tonight. My water quality is pretty good, and I'll get an airstone to put in their. If these don't work, it's a parasite, which would make sense because none of the other fish are acting like this (well every fish except the one Molly who died).
 
bizaliz3
  • #10
Possibly the new mollies introduced something to the tank. Did you QT them first?
 
Jenoli42
  • #11
Well I'll be doing a water change tonight. My water quality is pretty good, and I'll get an airstone to put in their. If these don't work, it's a parasite, which would make sense because none of the other fish are acting like this (well every fish except the one Molly who died).

Sounds like a plan! you can google which fish diseases cause breathing problems (that's why I asked about gills) ...I found this chart which may help. Chart on Fish Diseases, Symptoms and their Treatments
 
Millerific
  • Thread Starter
  • #12
Possibly the new mollies introduced something to the tank. Did you QT them first?
No, I don't have a Quarantine. I just don't have the space. I would if a got fish more often or if I had more space, and I am well aware that quarantining fish is very good. I buy my fish from a lfs that I trust very much, and we've never had a problem with fish health.
 
Millerific
  • Thread Starter
  • #13
Sounds like a plan! you can google which fish diseases cause breathing problems (that's why I asked about gills) ...I found this chart which may help. Chart on Fish Diseases, Symptoms and their Treatments
I already did the water change and cranked the temperature up. I don't have an airstone yet.
 
Millerific
  • Thread Starter
  • #14
Sounds like a plan! you can google which fish diseases cause breathing problems (that's why I asked about gills) ...I found this chart which may help. Chart on Fish Diseases, Symptoms and their Treatments
Just read the chart. None of them fit. Inactivity and gasping for air are symptome, but it always had weight loss, red gills, and other symptoms my angel doesn't have.
 
Jenoli42
  • #15
Just read the chart. None of them fit. Inactivity and gasping for air are symptome, but it always had weight loss, red gills, and other symptoms my angel doesn't have.
Well, i'm not an expert, but you may want to get an airstone and then watch for other symptoms like white stringy poo.

this link may help? remember, not all fish display all symptoms of an illness just like not all humans have the same symptoms even when we have the same illness. good luck!

 
Millerific
  • Thread Starter
  • #16
Well, i'm not an expert, but you may want to get an airstone and then watch for other symptoms like white stringy poo.

this link may help? remember, not all fish display all symptoms of an illness just like not all humans have the same symptoms even when we have the same illness. good luck!
Thank you! I have an airstone in their now, and it's kinda working already.
 
Jenoli42
  • #17
Thank you! I have an airstone in their now, and it's kinda working already.
Yay! I hope this was the issue and your fave fish is happy now! We have 2 airstones (1 airpump, used a T join to split the flow through 2 hoses) in our 49g tank, which may be overkill but our fish seem happy
 
Millerific
  • Thread Starter
  • #18
Update: I lost one of my plecos in that tank this morning. Something is going wrong...
 
DutchAquarium
  • #19
do a 50% water change and run carbon. Something has poisoned your aquarium, I'm guessing.
 
Jenoli42
  • #20
my only ideas:

-disease from fish added recently
- accidentally not conditioning water when doing water/ filter change
- accidentally getting chemical/ poison into tank during filter/ water change
... this could include adhesive from a sticker on your new filter or a bit of tape making it's way to tank?
- random pH swing from water source (less likely)

I'm so sorry but without other symptoms it's so hard to guess/ help!

any chance a cleaning chemical got stuck in your tank sealant somehow & is leaching out into your tank?
 
Jenoli42
  • #21
Update: I lost one of my plecos in that tank this morning. Something is going wrong...
so sorry for your loss
 

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